Dallas Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Dallas Family Coat of Arms

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Dallas Coat of Arms Meaning

Dallas Name Origin & History

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Dallas Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Dallas blazon are the bend, fess, mullet and crescent. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and azure .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Dallas Name

Dallas Origin:
England, Scotland

Origins of Dallas:
This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon and Scottish origin, and has two possible origins, the first being a geographical name for someone who resided in a house by the valley, acquired from the Old English pre 7th Century “dael”, valley, and “hus” house.  The name could also be from a place name with this origin, such as Dalehouse in the North Riding of Yorkshire. The second source is locational from a place near Forres, thought to derive from the ancient British pre-Roman “dol,” pasture, itself acquired from the Gaelic “dail,” and the British “gwas,” dwelling, and means ” living in the pasture.”  The surname development since 1262, contain as Roger del Dalhous (1301, Yorkshire), William de Dalhous (1327, Yorkshire), John de Dolas (1429, Scotland) and Henry Dallas (1513, Scotland).  Among the records in London is the christening of James, son of Hugh Dallas, in June 1682 at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney.  The christening was noted in Scotland of Andrew, son of Arthur Dallas and Magdalan Allan, in April 1696 at Edinburgh, Midlothian.

Variations:
More common variations are: Dallass, Doallas, Dallaso, Dallias, Dhallas, Dallasa, Dallase, Dalls, Dalas, Dallasih.

England:
The surname Dallas first appeared in Moray, where they held a family seat from very early times, some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Archebaldus de Doleys, dated 1262, in the of “ Acts of Parliament of Scotland.” It was during the reign of King Alexander III of Scotland, dated 1249-1286. Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:
Many of the people with surname Dallas had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Dallas landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th.  Some of the people with the name Dallas who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Alexander Dallas who settled in Jamaica in 1775.

The following century saw much more Dallas surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Dallas who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Peter Dallas, aged 60, arrived in North Carolina in 1812.  Alexander Dallas, who arrived in New York, NY in 1815.  John Dallas, who arrived in New York, NY in 1817.  Margaret Dallas, aged 17, landed in Mobile, Ala in 1820-1873.  Duncan Dallas, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1842.

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Dallas who landed in Australia in the 19th century included William Dallas, a blacksmith, arrived in New South Wales, Australia sometime between 1825 and 1832.

New-Zealand:
Some of the population with the surname Dallas who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included A. S. Dallas arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Ulcoats” in 1864.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Dallas:
United States 10,201; Greece 1,745; England 1,656; South Africa 1,278; Brazil 874; Jamaica 821; Australia 776; Canada 590; Scotland 578; France 367.

Notable People:
Alexander Grant Dallas (July 1816 – January 1882) was a Chief Factor in the Hudson’s Bay Company and superintendent of the Columbia District and New Caledonia from 1857 to 1861, then superintendent of Fort Garry in what was to become Manitoba from 1862 to 1864.
Darcy Dallas (born October 1972) is an old Canadian professional ice hockey defenseman. He served Northern Michigan University to play four seasons (1993 – 1997) with the Northern Michigan Wildcats where he guided the NCAA college hockey team, scoring 13 goals and 38 assists for 51 points, while earning 236 penalty minutes, in 106 games played.
Alexander J. Dallas (United States Navy officer) (1791-1844), was a U.S. Navy officer; brother of George M. Dallas.
DeVan “Van” Dallas (March 1926 – November 2016) was an American leader in the state of Mississippi.  He served in the Mississippi House of Representatives from 1964 to 1976.
Eneas Sweetland Dallas (1828–1879), was a Scottish writer.
George M. Dallas (1792-1864), was the 11th Vice President of the United States of America.
Hugh Dallas (born 1957), is an old Scottish football (soccer) referee.
Ian Dallas (Abdalqadir as-Sufi) (born 1930), is a Scottish writer and Muslim follower.
John Dallas (rugby player) (1878–1942), was a Scottish rugby union player and referee.
Josh Dallas (born 1978), is an American actor.
Karl Dallas (born 1931), is a British author, musician, and activist.
Matt Dallas (born 1982), is an American actor.
Robert Dallas (1756–1824), was a British judge.
Sandra Dallas was an American writer.
Stuart Dallas (born 1991), is a Northern Ireland soccer player.

Dallas Family Gift Ideas

Browse Dallas family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: (Petsal, co. Stafford, bart.). Motto—Lux venit ab alto. Blazon: Ar. a bend az. betw. three mullets gu. Crest—A crescent per pale or and gu.
2) Notes: (St. Martin’s, co. Rose, as recorded 1815, for Sir Thomas Dallas, K.C.B.). Motto—Lux venit ab alto. Blazon: Ar. a fess betw. five stars of six points gu. Crest—An increscent ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105