Dalling Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Dalling Family Coat of Arms

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Dalling Coat of Arms Meaning

Dalling Name Origin & History

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Dalling Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Dalling blazon are the martlet, bend, acorn and cinquefoil. The two main tinctures (colors) are ermine and sable.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

Amongst the natural objects depicted on a coat of arms, trees feature frequently, either in whole or as individual branches and leaves or fruit. 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407. The acorn, often represented in its early state as vert (green) 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Acorn can be associated of course with the mighty oak, signifying, according to Wade, “antiquity and strength”, for obvious reasons.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Dalling Name

Dalling Origin:

England

Origins of Dalling:

According to the early recordings of the spellings of the name, this interesting and unique surname was listed in many spelling forms such as Dallan, Dallen, Dallin, Dalling, Dallun, Dallyn and possibly more, this is an English surname. It is geographical from either of the hamlets now known as Field Dalling and Wood Dalling in the division of Norfolk. These were noted as Dallinga in the famous Domesday Book of 1086, and share the similar meaning and origin. It is the establishment of the Dealla people, from the pre 7th Century particular name Dealla which means proud, with -ingas, to give the place of the Dealla clan. Early examples of the surname records acquired from remaining agreements and parish records contain as Roger Dallyn, the vicar of Brooke in Norfolk, in the year 1408, Jane Dallen who married Franc Briclebank (as spelt) at St Giles Cripplegate, City of London in October 1589, and Sarah Dallon, named at St Brides Fleet Street, also city of London, in April 1657. It was during the “reign” of Oliver Cromwell (1650 – 1658).

Variations:

More common variations are: Dallinga, Daalling, Dwalling, Dahlling, Dailing, Dealling, Daling, Dlling, Dolling, Dilling.

England:

The origins of the surname Dalling appeared in Cheshire where people held a family seat from old times. Someone say better before the invasion of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Thuroldus de Dallenges, dated about 1108, in the “Pipe Rolls of the County of Norfolk.” It was during the time of King Henry I, who was known to be the “The Lion of the Justice,” dated 1100-1135. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Dalling had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Dalling landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Dalling who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Rosalia Dalling at the age of 29, arrived in New York in 1897 aboard the ship “Trave” from Bremen, Germany.

The following century saw more Dalling surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Dalling who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included James R. Dalling at the age of 47, arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship “Leviathan” from Brest, France. Jane K. Dalling at the age of 55, originally from Castle Douglas, Scotland, arrived in New York in 1920 aboard the ship Aquitania” from Southampton, England. John Dalling at the age of 39, came in City Island, NY in 1921 from Cienfuegos, Cuba.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Dalling who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Samuel Dalling arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Duke of Bedford” in 1848.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Dalling: United States 410; England 328; South Africa 256; Canada 188; Jamaica 161; Australia 136; Wales 135; Sweden 65; Scotland 53; Denmark 20.

Notable People:

Bruce Dalling (August 1938–July 2008) was a Springbok South African yachtsman, national hero, and lawyer, well-known for taking second place on passed time and first on corrected time for the monohull award in the 1968 Observer Single-Handed Trans-Atlantic Race.

(William) Henry Lytton Earle Bulwer, 1st Baron Dalling and Bulwer GCB, PC (February 1801–May 1872) was a British Liberal leader, politician, and author.

General Sir John Dalling, 1st Baronet (c. 1731 –January 1798) was a British fighter and colonial governor.

The Dalling Baronetcy, of Burwood in the Division of Surrey, held a title in the Baronetage of Great Britain. It was formed in March 1783 for the fighter and colonial administrator John Dalling.

Dalling Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Burwood Park, co. Surrey, bart., extinct). Erm. on a bend sa. three acorns or, slipped vert. Crest—A cubit arm erect holding a branch of oak fructed ppr.
2) Same Arms. Crest—A cannon therefrom a chain in form of an arch and within it a lion’s head erased ppr.
3) (Estwicke, co. Norfolk). Gu. on a chev. betw. three eagles close reguard. or, as many cinquefoils sa.
See Lytton-Bulwer.
4) Erm. on a bend sa. three trefoils or, on a chief gu. an anchor betw. two martlets ar.
5) Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. three holly leaves (another, woodbine leaves) vert, as many bezants.
6) Same Arms, a chief gu. charged with an anchor betw. two martlets ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Acorn