Dufresne Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Dufresne Family Coat of Arms

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Dufresne Coat of Arms Meaning

Dufresne Name Origin & History

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Dufresne Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Dufresne blazon are the mullet, chevron, ash tree and proboscis. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and gules .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.14The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

Amongst the natural objects depicted on a coat of arms, trees feature frequently, either in whole or as individual branches and leaves. 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407. Sometimes the species or the part of tree was chosen as an allusion to the name of the bearer, as in Argent three tree stumps (also known as stocks) sable” for Blackstock 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P309 Trees of course had long been venerated and its use in a coat of arms may have represented some association with the god Thor 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P112Wade points out the the Ash Tree was particularly venerated by the Saxons. 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P128

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Dufresne Name

The Dufresne surname comes from the name of the hamlet of Fresne, which was in the territory of Bourgogne.  During the late Middle Ages in France, as hereditary surnames started to be adopted names that acquired from localities became increasingly widespread.  Sometimes these names could become proprietorship of the village or estate.  Spelling variations of this family name include: Fresne, du Fresne, Frayne, du Frayne, Fresnes, Fraynes, Dufresne, Dufresnes, Dufrayne, Dufraynes, Frene, Frenes, Frane, Franes, du Frene, du Frenes, du Frane, du Franes, Dufrene, Dufrenes, Dufrane, Dufranes, Fraines, Fraine, Freyne, Freynes, Frenne, Frennes, Fresnne, Fresnnes, Fresnais, Fraigne and much more.

The surname Dufresne first found in Burgundy (French: Bourgogne), an administrative and historical region of east-central France, where this family has held a family seat since old times.  The name acquired from the Old French word for “ash” as in Ash tree from the Latin: fraxinus. Some of the people with the surname Dufresne who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Jacques DuFresne, who landed in Montreal in 1661.

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Browse Dufresne family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) France - (Baron de l'Empire) D'argent au chevron de gueules acc de trois étoiles d'azur piramide de trois pierres entassées de gueules (1 et 2) l'écu bordé d'or Bourlet d'or et d'azur Cimier les meubles de l'écu entre deux proboscides coupées alternativement d'azur et d'or Lambrequin à dextre de gueules et d'or à senestre d'azur et d'or. English: Argent a chevron Gules between three mullets Azure. [The rest is a error of interpolation from a different family]
2) Mâconnais - Famille dont tous les membres portent le prénom de Quinault, confondu parfois avec leur patronymique. Ses membres sont qualifiés d'écuyers au XVIIIe siècle; Arch. des colt. d'Ex-Libris D'argent à un frêne arraché de sinople au chef de gueules chargé de trois étoiles d'argent Couronne de comte Supports deux lions. English: Argent an ash tree eradicated Vert on a chief Gules three mullets Argent. The shield ensigned with the coronet of a French count. Supporters: lions.
3) Bavière - (An., 8 juillet 1765) D'or à un frêne de sinople terrassé du même Casque couronné Cimier le frêne entre deux proboscides coupées alternativement d'or et de sinople. English: Or an ash tree issuant from a terrasse Vert. Crest: from a crest coronet an ash tree Vert between two probosces per fess alternating Or and Vert.
4) Berne D'or à un frêne de sinople posé sur un tertre du même Cimier un frêne de sinople. English: Or an ash tree issuant from a mount Vert. Crest: an ash tree Vert.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
14. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P309
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P112
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P128