Eady Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Eady Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Eady Coat of Arms Meaning

Eady Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Eady. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

eady coat of arms

Eady Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Eady blazon are the fleur-de-lis, chevron and serpent. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, gules and ermine .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.14The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 16Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The serpent Is a typical example of a mythical creature, as real to a person of the middle ages as dogs, cats and elephants are to us today.

Eady Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Eady Name

Eady Origin:

England

Origins of Eady:

This interesting and unique surname is of English origin and a nickname of the Middle English given name Edwy, from old English pre 7th Century word Eadwig, a combination of the components “ead” which means “good fortune” or “luck” and the word “wig” which means “war.” The surname is dates back to the middle of the 13th Century. More recordings consist of one Adam Eadwy (1275), in “The premium Rolls of Suffolk.” Differentiation in the spellings of the name are Eddis, Edds, Edes, Edis, Edison, Edesin, etc. The marriage of Richard Eyddes and Johanna Edley in London in 1533 and Joan Eddie married William Woode in January 1600 at St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London. Herbert Edes named in 1606 at University College, Oxford, and Thomas, son of Thomas and Frances Eddie, named in April 1653 at St. Botolph, Bishopsgate, London.

Variations:

More common variations are: Eaddy, Eady, Eaday, Eadyy, Eadya, Eadye, Eaidy, Eady, Edy, Ead.

England:

The surname Eady was first found in many divisions all over the England such as The Hundredorum Rolls of the 1273 celebration. The first lists of the name consist of Edde in Norfolk, Edde filius Hugh in Huntingdonshire, William filius Ede in Suffolk, Robert filius Ede in Huntingdonshire and William Ede in Norfolk.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Robert Edwy, dated about 1254, at St. Botolph, Bishopsgate, London. It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:

Many people with the surname Eady had emigrated to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the surname Eady who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Mrs. Eady who arrived in San Francisco, California in the year 1851.

Canada:

People with the surname Eady settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in the 18th and 19th Some of the individuals with the name Eady who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Private Daniel Eady from Vermont, who arrived in St Jean Sur Richelieu, Quebec about 1783. He served in the King’s Royal soldiers and passed away in 1784. He was married to Sarah Jones, and they had five children. Mr. Daniel Eady arrived in Canada in about 1784.

The following century saw much more Eady surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Eady who settled in Canada in the 19th century included John Eady came to Catalina, Newfoundland in the year 1848. William Eady was a fisherman of Bay de Verde, Newfoundland in 1871.

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Eady who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Mary Eady, Louisa Eady, William Eady, Thomas Eady and Arthur Eady, all arrived in Auckland, New-Zealand aboard the ship “Andrew Jackson” in the year 1865.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Eady: United States 4,095; England 995; Australia 366; Ireland 27; Canada 682; South Africa 365; Scotland 46; New-Zealand 303; Spain 23; France 49.

Notable People:

Charles Eady, (1870–1945), an Australian cricketer who played for Tasmanian clubs. He also played two times in Test cricket for Australia.

Charles Swinfen Eady, 1st Baron Swinfen, (1851–1919), was a British lawyer and justice.

Cornelius Eady is an American poet who paid special attention to the substance of race and society. His poetry often focused on jazz and blues, family life, intensity, and societal problems derived from questions of race and class.

David Eady is a resigned High Court judge in England and Wales. As a justice, he is famous for having presided over many high profile cases before him. He was born in the year 1943.

David Eady (film director), was a British film producer and director.

Hanna Eady was a Palestinian-American actor, entertainer, and composer.

Eady Family Gift Ideas

Browse Eady family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More eady Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: None. Blazon: Ermine a chevron gules in chief two fleurs-de-lis vert. Crest —A fleur-de-lis environed with a serpent.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
14. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164