Eames Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Eames Family Coat of Arms

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Eames Coat of Arms Meaning

Eames Name Origin & History

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Eames Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Eames blazon are the lion and fess. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and gules .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.7The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 13A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Eames Name

Eames Origin:

England

Origins of Eames:

This interesting and unique surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a nickname form of the Son of the Middle English “eme,” itself acquiring from the Olde English pre 7th Century “eam” which means “uncle, relative.” It was considered that the love name “Uncle” was frequently used for a person who played an important role to a young niece or nephew supporting the death of the father, or, used as a term of affection or love for a kind older man. The surname was first listed in the second half of the 13th Century, and an early recording was of one John Eame, who was found in the 1280 lists of St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, London. An initial “h” is an addition to the name in the early 16th Century like Robert Heme of Suffolk. This “h” remains in new spellings of the name like in Heam(s) and Heme(s). A William Eames was listed in the Record of the Abbey of Whitby, Yorkshire, in 1340. An interesting name ancestor, was listed in the “Documents of National Biography,” was John Eames who died in 1744, F.R.S., a friend of Sir Isaac Newton, who edited Isaac Watt’s “Knowledge of the Heavens and Earth made Easy,” in the year 1726.

Variations:

More common variations are: Yeames, Eiames, Eeames, Ames, Emes, Eams, Amies, Amess, Aymes, Aimes.

England:

The surname Eames was first found in the division of Northumberland, where they were given estates by King William after the Norman invasion in 1066. They derived from Exmes, a town in the section of Orne, in Normandy.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Andrew le Em, dated about 1274, in the “Hundred Rolls of Norfolk.” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Eames had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Eames settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the individuals with the name Eames who landed in the United States in the 17th century included Anthony Eames, who arrived in Charlestown, Massachusetts in 1634. Thomas Eames, who came in Dedham, Massachusetts in 1634.

People with the surname Eames who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Robert Eames landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the year 1777.

The following century saw many more Eames surnames arrive. Some of the population with the surname Eames who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included W J Eames and A D Eames, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1851.

Australia:

People with the surname Eames who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Charles Harvey Eames arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Buckinghamshire” in 1839. Richard Joseph Eames and Elizabeth Margaret Eames, both arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “D’Auvergne” in the same year 1839.

New-Zealand:

Some of the individuals with the surname Eames who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Robert Eames landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1842 aboard the ship Bombay. Robert Eames and Elizabeth Eames both arrived in Nelson aboard the ship “Bombay” in the same year 1842. Charles Eames at the age of 32 came to Otago aboard the ship “Dallam Tower” in 1875. William Eames arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “British King” in 1883.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Eames: United States 3,680; England 3,576; Australia 1,355; South Africa 384; Wales 226; Canada 210; New Zealand 142; Ireland 93; Scotland 79; France 61.

Notable People:

Fidelma Healy Eames is an Irish leader.

Fred Eames is an American billiards champion.

Marion Eames (1921–2007), was a Welsh novel writer.

Mark Eames (born 1961), is a Hong Kong cricket player.

Eames Family Gift Ideas

Browse Eames family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (co. Somerset). Blazon: Or, a fesse sa. a demi lion ramp, issuant gu. Crest—A demi lion ramp. sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
13. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse