Eastland Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Eastland Family Coat of Arms

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Eastland Coat of Arms Meaning

Eastland Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Estland.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Eastland. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Eastland Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Eastland blazon are the horse, bend cotised and basket. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, argent and or .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? Nevertheless, real animals 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191 are perhaps one of the most common sights on coats of arms, especially animals of European origin. The horse Is a typical example of these.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. To add extra impact it can be cotised, with the addition of narrower bends to either side, which may be other tinctures for even more distinction. 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P123. They are not common, but make a worthy and striking addition to any coat of arms.

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. The humble but useful basket is a typical example of this. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Eastland Name

Origins of Eastland:
The Eastland surname acquires from any of many places so named in Old English.

Variations:
More common variations are: Eaastland, Estland, Eastlund, Esteland, Eastlend, Oastland, Aastland, Eastlond, Estlund, Ostland.

England:
The surname Eastland first appeared in Kent where they held a family seat as Lords of the Estate.  The Saxon rule of English history declined after the Battle of Hastings in 1066.  The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries, and the Norman atmosphere prevailed.  But Saxon surnames remained and the family name first introduced in the year 1198 when Simon de Estlande held estates in that division.  The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Eastland landed in the United States in  the 17th century.    Some of the people with the name Eastland who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Eastland, who settled in Virginia in 1664.  John Eastland, who arrived in Virginia in 1664.

Canada:
People with the surname Eastland settled in Canada in 18th    Some of the people with the surname Eastland who came to Canada in the 18th century included Charles Eastland, Edward Eastland, and George Eastland, who were all on record in the census of Ontario, Canada in 1871.

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Eastland who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Edwin Eastland at the age of 21, a carpenter, arrived in South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship “Fitzjarnes”.  Emma Eastland at the age of 17, a domestic servant, arrived in South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship “Fitzjarnes”.

Eastland Family Gift Ideas

Browse Eastland family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Az. a bend or, cotised ar. betw. six horse-shoes of the second. Crest—An arm in armour embowed ppr. holding a fleur-de-lis or.
2) Az. a bend or, cotised ar. betw. six wicker baskets of the second.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P123
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100