Egleston Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Egleston Family Coat of Arms

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Egleston Coat of Arms Meaning

Egleston Name Origin & History

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Egleston Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Egleston blazon are the fleur-de-lis, pile wavy and eagle. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, sable and very .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

The pile was originally quite a simple shape, being a triangle reaching from the top of the shield down to a point near the lower centre 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pile. It can also be given a decorative egde style, and Wavy works well in this respect. It is, for obvious reasons, associated with both water and the sea 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40. Indeed, a roundel with alternating bars of azure and argent (blue and white) is known by the shorthand term fountain, representing water at the bottom of a well 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water. Other colours have also been used and the result can be very pleasing to the eye.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Egleston Name

Origins of Egleston:
This surname acquired from a geographical locality. (1) ‘of Egglestone,’ a chapelry in the church of Middleton-in-Teesdale, County Durham; (a) ‘of Eggleston Abbey,’ in the church of Rokeby, union of Teesdale, North Riding of Yorkshire Perhaps in some examples a lazified form of Eccleston, which see, compare Slagg for Slack, &c.  Although the name, Egleston, found in many references, from time to time, the surname shown with the spellings Eagleton, Eaglestone, Eglestone, Egglestone and much more.

Variations:
More common variations are: Eggleston, Eagleston, Eglestone, Eglleston, Eglston, Egglestone, Eaglestone, Eaglestown, Eaggleston, Egglesston.

England:
The surname Egleston first appeared in Durham. Egglestone Abbey is an old Premonstratensian Abbey on the southern Yorkshire bank of the River Tees, now in ruins.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Egleston landed in the United States in the 17th century.  Some of the people with the name Egleston who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Richard Egleston, who landed in Virginia in the year 1637.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Lancaster). Ar. a cross sa. betw. four fleurs- de-lis gu.
2) (co. Lancaster). Ar. three piles wavy sa.
3) Ar. a cross sa. in the first quarter a fleur-de-lis of the second (another, the eagle gu.). Crest—A talbot’s head erased sa. collared ar.
4) Per pale gu. and vert an eagle displ. ar. armed or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pile
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74