Fotheringham Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Fotheringham Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Fotheringham Coat of Arms Meaning

Fotheringham Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Fotheringham. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

fotheringham coat of arms

Fotheringham Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Fotheringham blazon are the savage, bar, buckle and griffin’s head. The two main tinctures (colors) are ermine and gules.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Heraldry is a human art, by and for people and it is not surprising that people themselves are frequently depicted in arms 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174. As well as the nobility themselves, we also see both the mundane, ploughmen, fishermen and reapers; and the exotic in the form of club wielding savagesand the Moorish or Saracen gentleman with his decorative wreathed turban 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P168.

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). Bars can be a distinctive and easily recognised device, early examples include those awarded by Henry III of England to the family MAUDYT Argent, two bars gules.

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100 The buckle may fall into this category, it is present in a surprising number of different forms and has a long heritage in use, 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Buckle being considered honourable bearings and are said to “signify victorious fidelity in authority”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P115

Fotheringham Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Fotheringham Name

Fotheringham Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Fotheringham:

This attractive and unusual surname is of Scottish origin and is a geographical name from Fothringham, near Forfar, which itself looks to have come from Fotheringhay in Northamptonshire, which was held in the 12th Century by the royal family of Scotland as part of the recognition of Huntingdon. The place in Northamptonshire acquired from the Olde English pre 7th Century “fodring,” which means feeding, a copy of “fodor,” which means grain, and “eg,” which means island, low-lying land, and was first noted as “Fodringeia,” in the Domesday Book of 1086. In the example of the Scottish place, the final component has replaced by the Olde English “ham,” which means home. The surname advancement since 1261 contains a Walter de Fodringgeye (1291, Scotland); Huwe de Foderingeye (1296, Perth); Henry de Foddrynghame (1358, Perth); and Henry de Fodrynghay (1364, Brechin). The new surname can appear as Fotheringham, Fothringham, Fotringham and Fotringham. Among the documentations in Scotland are the weddings of David Fotheringham and Margaret Ker in March 1602, at Midlothian, and of James Fotheringham and Marion Gibson in December 1669, also at Midlothian.

Variations:

More common variations are: Fotheringhame, Fothringham, Fotherhingham, Fotheingham, Footheringham, Fatheringham, Futheringham, Fathingham, Featheringham

Scotland:

The surname Fotheringham first appeared in Angus where they held a family seat from old times. Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Dominus Robert de Ffodryngay, dated about 1261, in the “Register of Panmure,” Brechin-Barclay, Edinburgh, Scotland. It was during the time of King Alexander III, dated 1249 – 1286.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Fotheringham had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Fotheringham landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Fotheringham who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included John Fotheringham who settled in South Carolina in 1716.

The following century saw more Fotheringham surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Fotheringham who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included W Fotheringham, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Fotheringham who landed in Australia in the 19th century included James Fotheringham arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Indus” in 1839. Douglas Fotheringham at the age of 27, arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship “Charlotte Jane.” Margaret Fotheringharn at the age of 21, arrived in South Australia in 1859 aboard the ship “North.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Fotheringham who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included J. S. Fotheringham arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Timaru” in 1870. Margaret Fotheringham also arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Timaru” in the same year 1870. John Fotheringham at the age of 21, arrived in Bluff, New Zealand aboard the ship “Oamaru” in 1878.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Fotheringham: Scotland 1,188; England 1,167; United States 834; Australia 581; Canada 542; South Africa 402; Germany 168; Argentina 119; New Zealand 71; Switzerland 63.

Notable People:

Alasdair Fotheringham was a British commentator.

Allan Fotheringham (born 1932), is a Canadian announcer.

Henry Fotheringham (born 1953), is an old South African cricket player.

John Knight Fotheringham (1874–1936), was a British biographer who was an expert on old astrophotography and chronology.

Kevin Fotheringham (born 1975), is a Scottish football player with East Fife.

Mark Fotheringham (born 1957), is an old Australian rules football player.

Mark Fotheringham (born 1983), is a Scottish football player with Fulham.

Philip Fotheringham-Parker (1907–1981), was an English racecar driver.

Fotheringham Family Gift Ideas

Browse Fotheringham family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More fotheringham Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Pourie, co. Forfar). Motto—Be it fast. Erm. three bars gu. Crest—A griffin segreant ppr. Supporters—Two naked men wreathed about the head and middle with laurel ppr.
2) (Lawhill, Scotland). Motto—Be it fast. Erm. three bars gu. on each bar a buckle or. Crest—A griffin’s head couped ppr.
3) (Bandean, Scotland). Motto—Be it fast. Erm. three bars gu within a bordure of the second. Crest—A griffin’s head erased ppr.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P168
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Buckle
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P115