Goldsworthy Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Goldsworthy Family Coat of Arms

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Goldsworthy Coat of Arms Meaning

Goldsworthy Name Origin & History

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Goldsworthy Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Goldsworthy blazon are the bend, mullet and martlet. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and or.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Goldsworthy Name

Goldsworthy Origin:

England

Origins of Goldsworthy:

This uncommon West Country name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and a geographical surname acquiring from either Galsworthy, in Devonshire, or from the places in the churches of Crowan and Gwennop, Cornwall, called Goldsworthy. The place in Devonshire noted in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Galeshore.” The name acquires from the Olde English pre 7th Century “gagol,” which means sweet wind, marsh myrtle, with “ora,” which means bank, hill. The second component adapted to the common West Country place name ending “-worthy,” from the Olde English “worth,” which means a document, agreement. The Cornish placenames are so called from the Cornish components “gol,” which means field, with “erewy,” which means fair. So, the whole meanings of the name are “an open space where celebrations held.” Some of the new forms of the surname from these origins are Galsworthy, Golsworthy, Goldsworthy, and Galsery. Examples from Devonshire Parish Records contain William Galsworthy (1540, Parkham), Thomas Galsworthie (1558, Hartland) and the wedding of Grace Goldsworthy and Robert Pomerie in November 1611, at Honiton on Otter.

Variations:

More common variations are: Gouldsworthy, Goldasworthy, Goldesworthy, Goldsworithy, Goldsworthyy, Goldsworthey, Goldsworth, Goldesworth, Goldswarthy, Koldsworth.

England:

The origins of the surname Goldsworthy appeared in Devon where people held a family seat from early times. Someone say better before the invasion of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Thomas Gallysworthy, dated about 1524, in the record of “Hoskins and Feinberg, Devonshire Studies.” It was during the time of King Henry VIII, who was known to be the “Bluff King Hal,” dated 1509-1547. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Goldsworthy had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Goldsworthy landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Goldsworthy who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Goldsworthy who settled in Virginia in 1654.

The following century saw more Goldsworthy surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Goldsworthy who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included

Caroline, Elizabeth, Harritt, Jane, Joanna, John, Mary, Richard, Thomas Goldsworthy, all arrived in New York state in 1842. Caroline Goldsworthy, Elizabeth Goldsworthy, Harrill Goldsworthy and Jane Goldsworthy, all landed in New York, NY in 1842.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Goldsworthy who landed in Australia in the 19th century included George Goldsworthy, English prisoner from Surrey, who shifted aboard the “Albion” in May 1828, settling in New South Wales, Australia. James Goldsworthy arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Lady Bruce” in 1846. Richard Goldsworthy also arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Lady Bruce” in the same year 1846. William Goldsworthy arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Aboukir” in 1847. Elizabeth Goldsworthy arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Constance” in 1848.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Goldsworthy who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included John Goldsworthy, Elizabeth Goldsworthy, Elizabeth Goldsworthy, John Goldsworthy and Mary Goldsworthy, all arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Bolton” in the same year 1840.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Goldsworthy: Australia 2,083; England 1,479; United States 1,440; New Zealand 462; Canada 391; South Africa 384; Wales 271; Germany 202; Scotland 92; Chile 90.

Notable People:

Adrian Goldsworthy (born 1969), is a British archaeologist.

Andy Goldsworthy (born 1956), is a British artist.

Anna Goldsworthy (born 1974), is an Australian artist and writer.

Bill Goldsworthy (1944–1996), was a Canadian ice hockey player.

Burrington Goldsworthy (c.1705–1774), was an 18th century English Representative at Leghorn and later Cadiz.

Harry E. Goldsworthy (born 1914), was an American Air Force officer.

Goldsworthy Family Gift Ideas

Browse Goldsworthy family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Reg. College of Arms, May, 1779). Per pale or and ar. three mullets in bend sa. betw. two bendlets gu. Crest—An eagle's head erased per pale or and ar. holding in the beak a holly leaf vert.
2) Ar. on a bend cotised sa. three martlets or. Crest—A griffin’s head erased sa. holding in the beak a holly leaf vert.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79