Gott Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Gott Family Coat of Arms

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Gott Coat of Arms Meaning

Gott Name Origin & History

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Gott Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Gott blazon are the griffin and wings. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and argent.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]8Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

Wings are frequently observed in coats of arms. Unless otherwise specified they should be shown as eagle’s wings, with a realistic appearance. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wing They can appear singly or in pairs, in which form they are very often found in the crest, which rests above the shield in a full achievement of arms. Wade, quoting Quillim, suggests that the use of the wing on the shield signifies “celerity and protection or covering”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P73

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Gott Name

Gott Origin:

England, France, German

Origins of Gott:

According to early recordings, this name has many forms, ranging from English to French to German. Gott is a surname of many different origins. It may evolve from one of the many pre 7th century particular names such as Godbald, Gottfrid, Gottlieb, or Gotscelin. All of which include the word Gott or God which mean God, and an addition or enhancing suffix such as “lieb” which means love, or it may be location from living by a “gott,” which mean a watercourse or river. The addition “-er” or “ier” when it occurs, mention either one who works by such a place or it can be locational, and mention someone “of that place”. During the early examples of the inheritance of surname are those of Haldane Gotte, in the Assize Court records for the city of Lincoln in 1202, Counrad Gotti of Villingen, Germany, in 1329, and Berthold Gottelin of Konstanz in 1345. In England the surname looks to have been specifically famous in the early days, in both Lincolnshire and Yorkshire, though this is unclear why it was so famous.

Variations:

More common variations are: Gotto, Goutt, Gotty, Gotti, Gotte, Gotta, Gottu, Goett, Goott, Goatt.

Germany:

The origins of the surname Gott found is in Bavaria where the name closely recognized in early ancient times with the feudal society which would become outstanding all over European history. After that, the name would combine as a noble family with great effect, having many various branches, and became visible for its interest in social, business and political settlements. Like many other surnames, the name Gott becomes a specific name. Gott was a short form of many particular German names which start with that word, which mean “good” or “God.”

England:

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Godui Gott, dated about 1095, in the register of the abbey of Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. It was during the time of King William II of England dated 1087 – 1100. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Gott had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Gott settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Gott who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Charles Gott landed in Salem, Massachusetts in 1628. Henry Gott and Robert Gott arrived in Maryland respectively in the years 1651 and 1669.

Some of the people with the surname Gott who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Samuel Gott would eventually settle in New England in 1721 and George Gott arrived in Pennsylvania in the year 1754.

The following century saw much more Gott surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Gott who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Joh Fr Gott at the age of 45 in America in the year 1837. A Henry Gott arrived in Cincinnati, OH in1869-1870 and Henry A. Gott who arrived in Ohio in 1869.

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Gott who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included William Gott who at the age of 24, was a farm laborer that arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Dallam Tower” in the year 1875.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Gott: United States 5,969; England 1,592; Australia 312; Canada 282; Austria 105; Russia 108; Israel 130; Mexico 314; Germany 975; Brazil 350.

Notable People:

Benjamin Gott (1762–1840), was a British textile industrial worker.

J. Richard Gott (born 1947), is an American astronomer.

Jim Gott (born 1959), is an American baseball player.

Karel Gott (born 1939), is a Czech musician.

Larry Gott (born 1957), is a British singer.

Richard Gott (born 1938), is a British author and history writer.

Trevor Gott is an American baseball player.

Gott Family Gift Ideas

Browse Gott family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Battel, co. Sussex, and London). Blazon: Per saltire argent and sable a bordure counterchanged. Crest—A griffin's head ermines between two wings expanded ermine.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
8. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wing
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P73