Hague Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hague Family Coat of Arms

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Hague Coat of Arms Meaning

Hague Name Origin & History

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Hague Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hague blazon are the crescent, mullet and griffin. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, azure and gules .

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]17Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hague Name

Hague Origin:

England

 

Origins of Hague:

 

This unique and unusual name has a few possible origins. The first origin of this unique surname evolved originally from the Anglo-Saxon, geographical name for someone who lived by or in a hurdle or barrier. However, most of these names of various places had developed originally from the ancient Old English pre 7th Century term “haga”, or its Old Norse associated form “Hagi”, such as the three places called Haigh. It was developed irrespective of different formations of spellings. The second origin of this unusual name evolved originally from West Yorkshire and the other near Manchester. These places are first listed respectively as “Hagh” (1198), “Hagh” (1379), and “Hage” (1194). In a few cases the present name Hague, perhaps a locational from “The Hague” in the Netherlands, in Dutch “Den Haag”, which called from the Old Dutch “haag,” enclosure, match and same with the Olde English and Old Norse details and conditions. One William de Haghe registered in the assistance Rolls of Yorkshire in the year 1327, and John Hague married Alice Marshall listed in Bradfield, Yorkshire, on 7th February in the year 1589. A Coat of weapons granted to a Hague people of Micklegate, York, Yorkshire is per chevron gold and silver, two mullets blue, in prime and a red crescent, on the base. The Crest is a griffin’s head eliminate silver.

 

Variations:

 

More common variations of Hague are: Heague, Haique, Hoaque, Hauque, Haqu, Hauke, Hoque, Hauke, Hauquey, Hauquay, Houaque.

 

England:

 

The origins of the surname Hague were in Yorkshire, where Jollan de Hague registered in the year 1229. The Scottish people lived in Bemersyde for many centuries after their emigration from Scotland.

 

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Jollan de Hagh, dated 229, in the “Close Rolls of Yorkshire”. It was during the time of King Henry III, who was known to be the “The Father of the Navy,” 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

 

United States:

 

Some of the people of Hague family who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Walter Edward Hague, aged 26, who landed in New Haven, Conn in the year 1867.

 

Australia:

 

Some of The Hague people who settled ultimately in Australia in the 19th century included Caroline Hague, aged 18, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Marion” in the year 1849. Joseph Hague, who also arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Susannah” also in the year 1849. Charles Hague, whose age was 33, a Sawyer, also aboard the ship “Epaminondas”.

 

New-Zealand:

 

The settlement of Hague family began in New-Zealand in 19th Century. People who arrived in the 19th century included Thomas Hague, Eliza Hague, and John Sea Hague who arrived in Auckland, New-Zealand aboard the ship “Queen of the age” in the year 1874.

 

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hague: The United States 3,004; England 3,071; Australia 869; Canada 741; South Africa 329; New-Zealand 265; Scotland 249; France 404; Peru 214; India 151.

 

Notable People:

 

Albert Hague (1920–2001), was a German-American music or songwriter, musician, and actor. He wrote many fantastic songs.

 

Arnold Hague (1840–1917), was an American geologist.

 

Charles Hague (1769–1821), was an English musician and composer.

 

Sir Douglas Hague (1926–2015), was a British economist.

 

Frank Hague (1876–1856), was a famous politician. He was born in America.

 

Jim Hague (born 1961), was an American sports writer.

 

Joan B. Hague was a New York assemblywoman. She started her services in the year 1979 and retired in 1982.

 

Joe Hague (1944–1994), was an American baseball player.

 

Keith Hague was an English professional footballer. He was born in 1946.

 

Kevin Hague was a politician. He was born in New-Zealand in the year 1960.

 

Matt Hague was an American professional baseball player who was born in 1985.

 

Mel Hague, who was a British singer born in 1943.

 

Michael Hague was born in the year 1948. He was an American cartoonist.

 

Richard Hague (born 1947), was an American poet. He was born in 1947 and wrote many books about poetry.

 

Rob Hague was a British drummer.

 

Sam Hague (19th century), was the owner of a music group.

Hague Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Micklegate, co. York; descended from a Berkshire family of that name). Blazon: Per chevron or and argent two mullets azure in chief and a crescent gules in base. Crest—A griffin's head erased argent.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
17. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150