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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Middleham, co. Bedford). Ar. a cross moline sa. in tho dexter chief a fleur-de-lis gu.
2) (Horton Hall, co. Bucks, and of London). Ar. on a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads erased az. a bezant.
3) (Lord Hanover; extinct 1867). Motto—Turpiter despe ratur. Per pale ar. and or, on a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads erased, their necks encircled with mural crowns, three hawks’ lures ppr. Crest—A griffin’s head or, with a hawk’s lure ppr. in the mouth and a palm branch vert behind.
4) (Warnham, co. Sussex, and London. Visit. London, 1589). Ar. semee of crosses crosslet and three talbots’ heads erased sa.
5) (Banbury, co. Oxford. Visit. 1634. Anthony Hall, of that place, great grandson of Richard Hall, of Stoarford, in same co., Judge of Assize, temp. Henry VII.). (Banbury, co. Oxford; Anthony Hall, great grandson of Richard Hall, of Swarford, same co. Visit. 1634). Ar. an eagle displ. gu.
6) (co. Cambridge). Az. an eagle displ. or.
7) (Haninsley, co. Cambridge). (Streatham, in the Isle of Ely) Ar. a chev. gu. fretty of the first, betw. three demi lions ramp. az. on a chief of the second as many chaplets or.
8) (Barton Hall, and Hollybush, co. Derby; Lorenzo O’Toole, Esq., of Ballyfod, co. Wexford, m. Harriett, dau. and heir of Hugh Hall, Esq., of Hollybush, and had a son, Lorenzo Kirkpatrick O’Toole, who assumed, by royal licence, the name and arms of Hall). Az. three talbots’ heads erased sa. betw. eight cross crosslets gu.
9) (co. Devon). Sa. a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads erased ar.
10) (co. Devon). Az. a chev. ar. betw. three chaplets or.
11) (co. Devon). Gu. a bend vair betw. six crosses crosslet ar.
12) (co. Devon). Ar. four lozenges in pale gu. on each a. leopard’s face or.
13) (co. Devon). Ar. a broad arrow gu. feathered or, betw. three harts’ horns of the third.
14) (Brittly, co. Durham). Ar. a chev. sa. fretty or, betw. three demi lions pass. az. on a chief gu. as many annulets of the first.
15) (Newsham, co. Durham). Ar. a chev. engr. az. betw. three talbots’ heads sa. on a chief of the second as many mullets of the first. Crest—A talbot’s head erased ar. gorged with a collar chequy or and az.
16) (co. Essex). Or, four bars sa. on three escutcheons ar. as many church bells of the second, clappers of the first.
17) (co. Essex). Sa. a lion ramp. ar.
18) (Exeter; granted 20 March, 1684). Sa. three talbots’ heads erased ar. collared gu. with rings on the collars or. Crest—A talbot’s head erased sa. eared ar. gorged with a chaplet or, garnished with roses gu.
19) (High Meadow, co. Gloucester). Ar. a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads erased sa.
20) (Kennington, co. Kent). Az. three halberts in pale or. Crest—A horse’s head sa. in armour ppr. bridled and armed or, on the head two feathers, one az. the other gold.
21) (co. Lancaster). Ar. a chev. sa. fretty or, betw. three lions ramp. of the second, on a chief gu. as many roses of the third, barbed and seeded vert.
22) (co. Leicester). Gu. a lion ramp. guard or, crowned ar.
23) (cos. Lincoln and Middlesex, and Middle-Walton, co. York). Ar. a chev. sa. fretty or, betw. three demi lions ramp. az. on a chief gu. as many chaplets of the third. Crest—A dragon’s head couped az. collared or.
24) (Grantham, co. Lincoln; Sir Henry Sutton, Knt., of Averham, co. Notts, temp. Henry VIII., m. Alice, dau. of Francis Hall. Visit. Notts). Ar. three talbots’ heads erased sa.
25) (Spalding, co. Lincoln). Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three talbots’ heads erased sa. a bordure gu.
26) (Grantham, co. Lincoln). Ar. on a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads erased sa. as many estoiles or. Crest—A talbot’s head erased or, pellettee.
27) (Grantham, co. Lincoln). Sa. three talbots’ heads erased ar.
28) (Gretford, co. Lincoln). Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three talbots’ heads erased sa. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a plume of feathers ar. thereon a demi lion ramp. of the first.
29) (co. Lincoln, 1640). Ar. on a chev. engr. betw. three lions’ heads erased sa. an estoile or.
30) (co. Lincoln). Vert on a saltire engr. ar. five mullets gu.
31) (co. Lincoln). Same Arms, tinctures reversed, mullets or.
32) (Walton-on-the-Hill, co. Surrey). Motto—Esto quod esse videris. Ar. three talbots’ heads erased sa. langued gu. betw. nine cross crosslets of the last.
33) (Cilgwyn, co. Cardigan, and Greville House, co. Middlesex, lineally descended in direct line from the noble family of Fitzwilliam, by the branch Fitzwilliams, of the Hall (hence the name), settled at the Hall Place, co. Norfolk). Motto—Vive ut vivas. Some ancestors of the family bore in the 1st and 4th quarters, barry of twelve, five shields, and a talbot’s head for crest. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, barry of eight gu. and erm. over all three escutcheons ar.; 2nd and 3rd, gu. on a chev. ar. betw. three talbots’ heads ppr. collared or, and langued gu. as many blue bells also ppr. Crest—A demi lion ramp. holding a flaming sword imbrued all ppr.
34) (Greatford Hall, co. Lincoln, Skelton Castle, co. York, and Wratling Park, co. Cambridge; of the Fitzwilliams, of Cliseby). (Arrow’s Foot, co. York, a branch of the Halls, of Greatford Hall). Ar. on a chev. engr. sa. betw. three talbots’ heads erased of the second an estoile or. Crest—A talbot’s head erased sa. spotted or.
35) (Backlands Park, co. Wilts). Motto—Esse quam videri. Ar. on a chev. betw. Three talbots’ heads erased sa. an estoile or. Crest—A talbot’s head erased sa. spotted or.
36) (Ashford, co. Kent; granted, 1583, by Cooke, Clarenceux). Ar. three halberts in fesse headed ppr. handles or. Crest—A horse’s head couped sa. maned ar. bridled silver, tasselled gold, upon the head armour ppr. with a spilte upon the fore­head or, and therefrom issuant two ostrich feathers, the dexter gu. the sinister gold.
37) (Skipton, co. York; Edward Hall, citizen of London. Visit. 1668). Ar. a fess betw. two greyhounds courant sa. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi greyhound sa. collared gold.
38) (Sawforth and Harborough, co. Lincoln). Ar. a chev. betw. three demi lions ramp. gu. on a chief of the last as many chaplets or. Crest—A greyhound’s head erased gu. collared or.
39) (Ore, co. Sussex). Gu. three talbots’ heads erased ar.
40) (Rev. George Hall, D.D., Master of Pembroke College, Oxford). Ar. a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads erased sa. Crest—A talbot’s head, as in the arms.
41) Ar. a chev. sa. fretty or, betw. two columbincs ppr. Crest—A dove, in the beak an olive branch all ppr.
42) (co. York). Ar. a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads couped sa. Crest—A talbot’s head, as in the arms.
43) (cos. Berks and Oxford). Erm. five barrulets gu. over all three escutcheons or, a mullet for diif.
44) (Whatton Manor, co. Nottingham). Motto—Persevere. Az. a bend betw. three talbots’ heads erased ar. on a chief or, three roses gu. barbed and seeded ppr. Crest—A crescent ar. surmounted by a griffin’s head erased sa. in the beak three ears of wheat or.
45) (Costock, co. Nottingham). Ar. a chev. engr. gu. betw. three talbots’ heads erased sa.
46) (London; granted 18 May, 1768). Or, on a chev. sa. betw. three demi lions pass. az. five barrulets ar. on a chief gu. three chaplets of the fourth. Crest—A mural crown ar. thereout issuing a dexter arm embowed, habited az. fretty of the first, cuffed or, in the hand ppr. a dagger of the last, hilt and pommel gold.
47) (London). Or, on a chief sa. a cross moline fitchee of the field. Crest—A demi lion gu. supporting a cross moline fitchee or.
48) (London and Laventhorpe, co. York). Ar. a fesse betw. two greyhounds courant sa. collared or. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up ar. a greyhound sejant erm.
49) (London). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three talbots’ heads erased pean.
50) (London). Ar. three talbots’ heads erased sa. collared or, betw. five crosses crosslet gu.
51) (Hoxton, co. Middlesex; granted April, 1613). Az. on a chief erm. a lion pass. guard. of the field.
52) (co. Middlesex, and Northale and Kynersley, co. Salop; Har. MS. 1404). Gu. a wivern or, within a bordure az. charged with a verdoy of fleurs-de-lis, interlaced with an enurny of lions pass. of the second. Crest—On the stump of a tree couped or, a wivern, wings endorsed sa. collared, ringed, and lined of the first, the line reflexed over the back, grasping in the dexter claw a sword ar. hilt and pommel gold.
53) (co. Norfolk). Sa. a chev. ar. betw. three chaplets or. Crest—A demi buck saliant sa. attired or, gorged with a collar of the last charged with three chaplets of the first.
54) (Salisbury). Ar. on a chev. betw. three columbines az. stalked and leaved vert, a mullet of six points or.
55) (Henwick, co. Worcester, Rotheihithe, &c. Visit. Leicester, 1619). (Mathon, co. Worcester. Visit. Leicester, 1619). (Ar. three talbots’ heads erased sa. betw. nine crops crosslets az. Crest—A dragon’s head couped az. collared ar.
56) (Redcriff, near London. Visit. Leicester, 1619). Same Arms and Crest, a crescent for diff.
57) (Bishop of Bristol, 1691-1710). Sa. three talbots’ heads erased betw. nine cross crosslets ar.
58) (Warnham, co. Sussex, Goldings, co. Herts, London, &c.). Ar. three talbots’ heads erased sa. betw. nine cross crosslets gu.
59) (Wilsborough, co. Kent; granted 27 June, 1599. Visit. Kent, 1619). Gu. three poleaxes in pale or. Crest—“A horshead coupe sables armed with Shafferon and brydeled argent, purfled or plumed gould and goules.”
60) (co. Salop). Sa. billettee two bars erm. in chief a hound’s head erased betw. two chaplets or. Crest—A buck’s head armed or, collared sa.
61) Same Arms. Crest—A demi buck saliant or, eared sa. gorged with a fesse wavy betw. two cotises of the last.
62) (co. Salop). Ar. on a chev. cotised gu. three chaplets or.
63) (Hermitage, co. Chester). Ar. three talbots’ heads erased sa. Crest—A talbot’s head sa.
64) (co. Somerset). Az. a chev. erm. betw. three chaplets or.
65) (South Newington and Banbury, co. Oxford, and co. Warwick). Ar. an eagle displ. gu. Crest—A demi eagle with wings endorsed sa. collared or.
66) (Moundesmere, co. Southampton; granted 1767). Paly of four or and az. on a bend ar. three human hearts ppr. each pierced with two arrows saltireways of the first. Crest—A demi wolf ar. in the dexter paw a hears, as in the arms.
67) (Waram, co. Sussex, and London; John Hall, Citizen. Visit. 1568). Ar. semee of crosses crosslet three talbots’ heads erased sa.
68) (Captain James Hall, R.N.). Motto—Always ready. Ar. on a bend engr. az. betw. two anchors sa. three talbots’ heads erased of the field. Crest—A dexter cubit arm in bend, vested az. semee of escallops ar. grasping a dagger sheathed, point downwards ppr.
69) (Ipswich, co. Suffolk; confirmed 8 Feb. 1587). (Coggeshall, co. Essex, and co. York). Erm. five barrulets gu. over all three escutcheons or.
70) (Coventry, co. Warwick). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three columbines slipped ppr.
71) (Bradford, co. Wilts). Sa. three poleaxes ar. Crest—An arm embowed in armour ppr. garnished or, holding a poleaxe ar.
72) (co. York). Sa. a chev. betw. three dexter hands couped ar.
73) Gu. a lion ramp. crowned or.
74) Per pale ar. and sa. a chev. betw. three dolphins embowed all counterchanged.
75) Gu. a lion ramp. or, crowned az.
76) Az. an eagle displ. or, ducally gorged ar.
77) Ar. three lozenges in pale gu.
78) Az. a chev. betw. three covered cups or.
79) Vert a chev. ar.
80) Per bend vert and or.
81) Ar. three piles sa.
82) Ar. three crosses crosslet fitchee in bend az. betw. two bendlets gu. Crest—A dove and olive branch ppr.
83) Or, on a bend sa. three chevronels of the first betw. two lions ramp. of the second.
84) Ar. a chev. and bend gu. on a canton of the second a crescent of the first.
85) Gu. a dragon displ. ar. on his breast an escutcheon purp. a bordure az. verdoy of fleurs-de-lis or.
86) (Clifton, co. York, and the Grange Hall, co. Chester; descended from the ancient family of Clifton, co. York, resident at Leeds, 1700; Scarborough, 1750; and Manchester; the late John Hall, Esq., of Mersey Bank House, Heaton Norris, and Manchester, co. Lancaster, a magistrate for that county and the borough of Stockport, who represented this family, and d. 1 Oct. 1843, was eldest brother of the present Vice-Chancellor Hall, present representative). Motto—Aut pax aut bellum. Sa. on a chev. betw. three dexter hands couped and erect, each within an annulet ar. a wreath of laurel vert betw. two roses barbed and seeded ppr. Crest—A tilting spear erect surmounted by a sword and laurel branch saltirewise all ppr.
87) Ar. four bars humettee gu. on the second a leopard’s head or.
88) Erm. three lozenges gu.
89) Az. three eagles displ. ar.
90) Vert a griffin ramp. ar.
91) Ar. a chev. sa. fretty or, betw. three lions ramp. az. Crest—A dragon’s head couped az. collared or.
92) (Sir John Hall, K.C.B., M.D., Inspector-General of Hospitals, and Chief of the Medical Staff of the Army, son of late John Hall, Esq., of Littlebeck, Westmoreland). Motto—Perseverantia et cura quies. Or, on a pale betw. two battle axes erect sa. three talbots’ heads couped of the field. Crest—On a wreath the battlements of a tower, thereon a cock entwined by a snake all ppr.
93) (Westbank House, co. Chester). Barry of six erm. and vert on a chief az. a talbot’s head erased betw. two martlets or. Crest—A demi buck ppr. collared or.
94) (Newsham and Great Chilton, co. Durham; descended from the Halls of Greatford). (The junior branches of London, &c. bore the crest, collared counter-compony or and az. and the mullets in the arms ar.). Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three talbots’ heads erased az. on a chief of the second as many mullets or. Crest—A talbot’s head erased sa.
95) (Birtley, Conset, and Framwellgate, co. Durham, subsequently of Dublin, and of co. Antrim; afterwards of Bishop Wearmouth). (Greencroft; descended from Robert Hall, living in the fifteenth century). Or, a chev. sa. fretty of the first betw. three demi lions pass. az. on a chief gu. as many chaplets ar. a martlet for diff.
96) (Narrow Water, co. Down). (Mainwarra, co. Galway, and Merville, co. Dublin). Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three talbots’ heads erased sa. Crest—A bear’s head muzzled ppr.
97) (Ramelton, co. Donegal, and Barbadoes; allowed by Betham, 1810; granted to William Hall, Esq., of Sully co. Donegal). Motto—Cura quietem. Vert a chev. or, betw. three storks’ heads erased ar. all within a bordure of the second charged with eight trefoils slipped of the first. Crest—On a mount a stork ar. holding in her dexter claw a pellet.
98) (Dunglass, co. Haddington, bart., 1687). Motto—Dat cura quietem. Az. a chev. ar. betw. three storks’ heads erased at the neck or. Crest—A stork standing on a mount in a watching posture ppr.
99) (London, cadet of Dunglass, 1787). Motto—Per ardua ad alta. Az. a chev. engr. ar. betw. two storks’ heads erased in chief and a saltire couped in base or, a bordure of the second. Crest—A demi griffin ppr.
100) (Fullbar, co. Renfrew, Scotland). Az. a fesse chequy or and gu. betw. three herons’ heads erased ar.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Hall Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Meaning, Origin, Etymology
English, Scottish, Irish, German, and Scandinavian: from Middle English hall (Old English heall), Middle High German halle, Old Norse holl all meaning ‘hall’ (a spacious residence), hence a topographic name for someone who lived in or near a hall or an occupational name for a servant employed at a hall or manor. Field, Castle and Stone are other common examples of local names of this type. Not all Halls derived from this source though. (English) Dweller in, or near, the manor house; servant in the principal room of the manor house; dweller at the rock or stone, generally a boundary marker. A manor house. In medieval documents, Atte Halle, Del Hall, De Aula, &c. The principal apartment in all old mansions was the hall, and in feudal times it was a petty court of justice as well as the scene of entertainment. The chief servitor when the lord was resident, or the tenant when he was non-resident, would naturally acquire such a surname; and hence its frequency. Nearly 300 traders so called appear in the Lond. Direct. From the Old Norse, Hallr; from the Swedish, Hall; from the Flemish, Hal; a personal name. A variant of MacCaul, q.v. Hall without the prefix Mac in English. Parishes in Cheshire and Staffordshire. The name occurs in the north-east of England, and it seems that here the name Hall is a local name derived from the Old Norse for a ‘boulder or slope’ and was given to someone who lived on, near or under some prominent boulder or hillside. The surname Hall goes back to early feudal times. One Warin de Halla is mentioned in the 1178 Pipe Rolls for Essex, and two examples of the name appear in the Hundred Rolls of 1273. Or De Clarefai. The learned Joseph Hall, Bishop of Norwich, was son of Hall, seneschal to the Earl of Huntingdon, President of the North, and by his arms is identified as one of the Lincolnshire family of Halls of Grantham, the ancestor of which, on marriage with an heiress of the Halls, assumed the name and arms. William Fitz­william, son of Thomas, and brother of John Fitzwilliam, 14th cent., was the person alluded to who took the name of Hall, as appears from the Lincoln Visitation, 1592. See Fitz­william.

Edward Halley (1656—1742)

Halley’s  Comet, named for Edward Halley (1656—1742) and first observed by him in 1682, is probably the brightest and most spectacular known to us. Its brilliant passage across the heavens has long been thought to presage great historical events. It was seen in 1066 at the time of the Norman Conquest and is next due in 1986. The United Kingdom has 21 Hall-related towns and cities. These range from Halland to Hall Thwaites. Canada has 4 towns with Hall-related names while the United States has 14. Related town names are prevalent throughout Europe, there being 32 in all. These range from Austria’s Hall to Denmark’s Hallundback. Hall is unusually common as a geographic name ranging from the United Kingdom’s Halley Bay to Hall Table Mountain in Mozambique.

Spelling Variations
Hall, Halle, Haule, Haul, Hal, De Aule, Hally, Haill, Hallo, Hoall, Heall, Halli, Haila, Hallu, Holl, Haull

Early Marriage Records for
Rebecca Hall married John Bacon December 17, 1651 in Dedham, Massachusetts
Stephen Hall married Ruth Davis December 3, 1663 in Concord, Massachusetts
Timothy Hall married Sara Barber November 26, 1663 in Windsor, Connecticut
John Hall Jr. married Abigail Roberts November 8, 1671 in Dover, New Hampshire
Joseph Hall married Elizabeth Rank March 3, 1674 in Lynn, Massachusetts
Martha Hall married Ebenezer Williams September 18, 1674 in Dorchester, Massachusetts
Samuel Hall married Bashua Hinckley June 6, 1681 in Dorchester, Massachusetts
Robert Hall married Elizabeth Mackeniff October 18, 1682 in Somerset Co. Maryland
Elizabeth Hall married Isaac Pearson November 9, 1685 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Edmund Hall married Margery Parsons September 2, 1656 in Stepney, Middlesex, England
Rachell Hall married Jaques Mallett September 23, 1628 in Lincoln, England
James Hall married Mercy Davies July 21, 1656 in Stepney, Middlesex, England
Thomas Hall married Love Sheeres September 5, 1658 in Stepney, Middlesex, England

Popularity & Geographic Distribution
The last name Hall ranks 595th in popularity worldwide as of the 2014 Census and approximately 913,770 people carry the Hall surname worldwide. The name ranks particularly high in the following six states: Texas, California, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Ohio. It ranks highest in the following countries: United States (613,938), England (141,429), Australia (46,135), Canada (33,030), South Africa (14,398), and Jamaica (12,577).

Early Bearers of Surname
Roger de la Halle, Cambridgeshire. 1273. Hundred Rolls.
Walter de la Halle, Salop, ibid.
William atte Halle, Close Rolls, 16 Edward III. pt.
Willelmus atte Hall’, 1379: Poll Tax of Yorkshire.
Isabella at ye Halle, ibid.
Thomas del Hall. c. Henry IV: Estates and Families of Cumberland, Cumberland.
Waldeu de Aula witnessed a charter by Walter de Veteri Ponte a. 1200 (LSC., 44)
John of the Hall was one of an inquest made at Berwick, 1302 (Bain, II 1313)
c. 1311 Thomas dictus del Halle witnessed resignation by Adam de Dowane of his land of Grenryg in the barony of Lesmahagow (Kelso, 195)
In 1325 mention is made of Thomas dictus de Aula (LCD., p. 237)
Andreas de Aula held land in Aynstrother c. 1330 (Dryburgh, 252)
The first Hall of Fulbar in Renfrewshire was Thomas de Aula, surgeon, who for his faithful service obtained from Robert II a grant of land in the tenement of Staneley, barony of Renffrow, 1370 (RMS., I, 407,540)
Richard de Aula was tenant in Garvald, 1376 (RHM., I, p. lviii)
Nichol del Hall was merchant of the duke of Albany, 1400 (Bain, IV, 570)
William de Aula was chaplain to Alexander Hume of Dunglass, 1423 (HMC., 12. Rep App. 8, p. 87)
William de Hall held a land in Irvine, 1426 (Irvine, I, p. 130)
John de Hall, witness in Glasgow, 1454 (LCD., p. 176)
Nicholas de Aula, 1463 (REG., 380,389)
Allane of Hall in Sancharmyr was burgess of Prestwick, 1470 (Prestwick, 13), and in 1485 there is recorded an indenture between Robyne of Hall of the Fulbare and the Friars of Glasgow (LCD., p. 195)
Henrie Hall in Perth was charged with participating in ‘Idolatrus pastyme’ in 1581 (Mill, Plays, p. 279)
David Hall (c. 1714—1772), born in Edinburgh, became partner with Benjamin Franklin in printing business.
Serlo de Haula, of Normandy 1198 (Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae)
Thomas de Hal and Richard de la Hale held in Lincoln from De Senlis in 1105

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Swynford Manor, Six Mile Bottom

History, Genealogy & Ancestry
HALL OF SIX MILE BOTTOM.
Hall, William Henry, Esq. of The Cottage, Six Mile Bottom, Newmarket, co. Cambridge, J.P. and D.L., b. 5 April, 1837 ; m. 1st, 1868, Elizabeth Dennistoun, eldest dau. of the late William Cross, Esq. of Champion Hill, and has a son, Alexander Cross, 6. 16 Sept. 1869. He m. 2ndly, 1875, Berthe, youngest dau. of M. Auguste Goulden, of Marseilles, and has a dau., Elizabeth Lucy, 6. 5 Feb. 1877. Mr. Hall assumed the surname of Hall in lieu of that of Bullock, on succeeding his uncle, Gen. Hall, in 1872.
Lineage—Henry Robert Bullock, Major 1st Life Guards, on. 1825, Charlotte, dau. of John Hall, Esq. of Weston Colville, Cambridge, and d. 1845, having by her (who d. 1839) had issue, 1) John Henry, d. 1858. 2). Charles Henry, d. 1867. 3) William Henry. 4) Elizabeth Charlotte. 5) Juliana Elizabeth, to. John Josias Conybeare Olivier, Esq., and has issue, three sons and three daus. 6) Emily Anne. iv. Charlotte Olivia, d. 1870.
Seat—The Cottage, Six Mile Bottom, Newmarket.

alt='hollybush_hall'

Hollybush Hall Open House

HALL OF HOLLY BUSH.
Hall, Lorenzo Kirkpatrick, Esq. of Holly Bush, co. Derby, J.P. for Staffordshire and Derbyshire, and D.L. for co. Stafford, b. June, 1809 ; m. 1st, 3 July, 1834, Jane, dau. Of John Bell Crompton, Esq. of Duffield Hall, co. Derby, which lady d. 28 Jan. 1835 ; he m. 2ndly, Dec. 1841, Emma Selina, dau. of Edward Miller Mundy, Esq. of Shipley, co. Derby, and by her (who d. 24 April, 1869) he has had issue, 1). Edward Kirkpatrick, 6. 2 June, 1844; to. 1873, Marion Louisa, 2nd dau. of Thomas Webb, Esq. of Smallwood Manor, co. Stafford, and has issue, Lawrence Kirkpatrick; Fitzroy Henry ; John Edward Kenyon, 2) Kathleen Mary. 3). Jane Emma, m. Edith Millicent. 4) Evelyn Constance. Mr. Hall assumed by royal license the surname and arms of Hall.
Lineage —The ancient family of O’Toole, the paternal ancestry of Mr. Hall, of Hollybush, formerly possessed extensive territories in the north parts of the co. Wicklow, and had the castles of Castle Kevin and Powerscourt, and O’Toole’s Castle, now called Talbotstown. The representative of this famous race of O’Toole, Brian O’Toole, who forfeited Castle Kevin, temp. William III., had a son, Luke O’Toole, who had a son, Lawrence O’Toole, of Buckstown, co. Wexford, 6. 1722 ; m. 1st, Margaret, dau. of John Masterson, of Castletown, and had issue, 1) John, of whom presently. 2) Luke, an officer in the Irish Brigade, guillotined in the French revolution. 3) Lawrence, Capt. E.I.Co.’s service, who settled in the Isle of Bourbon, to. Francoise, dau. of De Similier de Kerdier, Governor of the Isle of Bourbon, and had three sons, 4) Eugene, an officer in the Irish Brigade, slain at Mayence. 5) Edward, d. aged 21. 6) Lawrence, to. Henriette de Bedier, aud d. 1820, leaving two sons, Edward, “ Commissaire dans la Marine Franeaise,” and Joseph Laurent, President of the Chamber of Commerce of the Isle of Bourbon. 7). Edward, served under Lord Rodney, 8) Mary, wife of William Talbot, Esq. of Castle Talbot. Lawrence O’Toole to. 2ndly, Elizabeth, dau. of William Talbot, Esq. of Castle Talbot, and by her had, William, d. unm. 1798. Matthew, w. Frances Tighe, of Warfield, and d. 1806, leaving two sons, Matthew, Capt. 82nd regt., b. about 1802; and Edward. Brian, Lieut.-Col., a distinguished officer in the Peninsular war, commanded the 8th Cacadores, d. s. p. Feb. 1825. Andrew, d. s. P. He d. 1794. His eldest son, by 1st marriage, John Count O’Toole, of Ballyfad, Lieut.-Col. Irish Brigade, to. Lady Catherine Annesley, dau. of the 6th Earl of Anglesey, and d. 1823, leaving a son, Lorenzo O’Toole, Esq., to. Harriett, dau. of Hugh Hall, Esq. of Hollybush, co. Derby, and d. 1828 (his wife had predeceased him Aug. 1809), leaving a son, Lorenzo O’Toole, Esq., now Hall, of Hollybush. Arms—Az. three talbots’ heads erased sa. between eight cross crosslets gu. -Seat—Hollybush, Sudbury, Derby.

HALL OF HALLSTEAD.
Hall, Marshall, Esq., of Hallstead Easterton, Wilts, J.P., Barrister-at-Law, late Capt. 1st (Royal East) Middlesex Militia, F.G-.S., F.C.S., m. 15 Aug. 1854, Mary Eliza, eldest dau. of the late John Mammatt, Esq. of Ashby Manor House, co. Leicester, and has had issue, 1) Algernon Strachev Marshall, 6. 3 Oct. 1855. 2) John Edward Marshall, b. 12 May, 1860. 3) George William Louis Marshall, 6. 28 March, 1862. 4) Edith Mary Marshall, d. 1871. 5) Charlotte Ethel Marshall.
Lineage—This family claims descent from John Fitz-William, through Hall of Grantham. The late Marshall Hall, M.D., F.R.S., was a distinguished Physiologist; he to. Charlotte, dau. of Valentine Green, Esq. of Normanton, co. Leicester, and d. 11 Aug. 1857. His son and heir is the present Marshall Hall, Esq. of Hallstead, Easterton. Arms—Arg., on a chevron between three talbots’ heads erased sa. an estoile or. Crest—A talbot’s head erased sa. semee of bezants. Motto—Esse quam videri. (Seat—Hallstead Easterton, Wilts.

alt='newtonbarry_house'

Newtonbarry House

HALL-DARE OF NEWTOWNBARRY. 
Hall-Dare, Robert Westley, Esq. of Newtownbarry House, co. Wexford, and Theydon Bois, Essex, b. 14 Oct. 1866 ; s. his father 1876.
Lineage— Elizabeth Eaton, eldest dau. and co-heir of Henry Eaton, Esq. of North Lodge, Essex, by Elizabeth his wife, last surviving child of George Mildmay, Esq. of Corbett’s Stye, Essex, m. 1st, 1779, John Dare, Esq. of Bentry Heath, Essex, and by him (who d. 1781) she had an only child, John Hopkins-Dare, Esq. of Theydon Bois, Essex, d. Unm. 9 Jan. 1805. Mrs. Dare to. 2ndly, 7 May, 1791, John Marmaduke Grafton, Esq. of Cranbrook House (only son of John Marmaduke Grafton, Esq. of Romford), who took the surname of Dare in addition to that of Grafton by royal sign manual, dated 12 Dec. 1805, and d. 22 Nov. 1810. Mrs. Dare d. 24 March, ‘ 1823, leaving by her 2nd husband an only child, Elizabeth Grafton Grafton-Dare, b. 7 May, 1793; to. 8 Nov. 1815, Robert Westley Hall, Esq. of Wyefield, and of Cranbrook, High Sheriff Essex 1821, and M.P. for South Essex, who took, by royal sign manual, dated 25 April, 1823, the surname and arms of Dare, in addition to those of Hall. Mr. Hall-Dare and his sister, Elizabeth Catherine (wife of Thomas Harpur King, Esq. of Hay Hill, co. Gloucester), were the children of Robert Westley Hall, Esq. of Ilford Lodge and FitzWalters, Essex, by Maria Elizabeth his wife (to. 1785), widow of Abraham de Codyn, Esq. of Demerara, and dau. Of Cornelius Brower, Esq. of the same place, and grandchildren of the.Rev. Westley Hall, who d. in London, circa 1770 leaving by his wife, Sarah Rogers, of Farnham, Surrey, besides his said son, Robert Westley Hall, a dau., to. Anthony Helleman, of Flushing. The Rev. Westley Hall was son of one of the Halls of Hillsborough, Kent, m. the dau. of Sir Robert Westley, who was Lord Mayor of London. Mr. Hall-Dare d. 20 May, 1836, and by his said wife, Elizabeth Grafton Grafton-Dare, left issue,1) Robert Westley, his heir. 2) John Grafton, b. 31 July; 1818, d. 25 Feb. 1819. 3) Henry, b. 8 Feb. 1825 ; to. 22 April, 1851, Agatha, dau. Of S. T. Kekewich, Esq., M.P., and has issue, Henry Arthur
Kekewich, Barrister-at-Law, b. 29 May, 1854; and Blanche. 4) Arthur Charles, b. 1836; d. an infant. 5) Francis Marmaduke, b. 1830. 6) Mary Elizabeth. 7) Emma Burton, to. Thomas Hilton Bothamley, Esq. 8) Anne Mildmay, d. 10 Oct. 1823. iv. Agnes, 9) Elizabeth, to. Rev. J. T. R. Fussell. The eldest son, Robert Westley Hall-Dare, Esq. of FitzWalters, Essex, 6 . 21 Jan. 1817 ; to. 18 April, 1839, Frances Anna Catherine, dau. of Gustavus Lambart, Esq. of Beauparc, co. Meath, and by her (who d. 2 Sept. 1862) had issue, Robert Westley, his heir. Charles. Olivia Frances Grafton. Mabel Virginia Anna. Ethel Constance Mary, to. 5 July 1870, Beauchamp Frederick Bagenal, Esq. of Benekerry, co. Carlow. Frances Maria. Mr. Hall-Dare d. 23 April, 1866. His eldest son, Robert Westley Hall-Dare, Esq. of Newtownbarry House, co. Wexford, and Theydon Bois, Essex, J.P. and D.L. co. Wexford (High Sheriff 1872), and J.P. co. Carlow, High Sheriff 1868, to. 27 Oct. 1863, Caroline Susan Henrietta, 2nd dau. Of the late Henry Newton, Esq. of Mount Leinster Lodge, co. Carlow, by Elizabeth Doyne his wife, and had issue, 1) Robert Westley, now of Newtownbarry. 2) Elizabeth Frances. He d. 1876. Arms—Quarterly : 1st, and 4th, az., a lion rampant arg. between three lozenges or, each charged with an increscent gu., in chief a cross-crosslet gold, for Dare; 2nd and 3rd, sa., on a chevron engrailed between three battle-axes erect or, as many eagles displayed of the field, for Hall. Crests—For Dare, A demi-lion rampant az., bezantee, charged on the shoulder with a cross-crosslet or, and holding between the paws a lozenge charged with an increscent as in the arms ; for Hall, A horse’s head couped sa. semee of mullets or, armed ppr., bridled arg., on the head two ostrich feathers of the first and third, and holding in the mouth a battle-axe or. Motto—Loyaute sans tache. Seats—Newtownbarry House, Newtownbarry, co. Wexford; and Theydon Bois, Epping, Essex.

Barton Abbey

HALL OF BARTON ABBEY. 
Hall, Alexander William, Esq. of Barton Abbey, co. Oxford, J.P. and D.L., High Sheriff 1867, M.P. for Oxford since 1874, b. 20 June, 1838 ; m. 27 Aug. 1863, Emma Gertrude, dau. Of Edward Jowett, Esq. of Eltofts, co. York, J.P., and has issue, 1) Alexander Nelson, b. 25 July, 1865. 2) Marion Alexandra Gertrude. 3) Muriel.
Lineage—The late Henry Hall, Esq. of Barton Abbey, m. 18 April, 1837, the Hon. Catherine Louisa Hood, 4th dau. Of Lord Bridport, by Charlotte Mary his wife, Duchess of Bronte, only surviving child and heir of William, 1st Earl of Nelson, and d. 1862, having had issue, Alexander William, now of Barton Abbey. Henry Samuel, Capt. in the Carabineers. Herbert Lee. Hugh. William Horace. Horatio Nelson. Arthur Yonge. Hilare Charlotte, to. J. de Burgh Eochfort, Esq. Frances Caroline. Catherine Hester. Motto—Nee temere nec timide. Seat—Barton Abbey, Steeple Aston, co. Oxford.

HALL OF WALTON-ON-THE-HILL.
Hall, The Rev. Ambrose William, of Walton-on-the Hill, Surrey, M.A., Rector of Debden, co.
Essex, bapt. at Walton-on-the-Hill 9 Aug. 1813 m. 31 Oct. 1837, Anne Hall, dau. and co-heir of Robert Farran, Esq. of Old Dorset Place, Clapham Road, Surrey, and by her (who d. 17 April, 1863), has issue, 1) Humphrey Farran (Rev.), of Thistley Hall, Essex, Chaplain of High Legh, co. Chester, b. 15 Sept. 1838. 2) Ambrose George, of Buenos Ayres, South America, b. 22 Nov. 1840. 3) Caroline Emily. 4) Alice Ruth, m. 26 Sept. 1867, George William Marshall, Esq., LL.M., of Ward End, co. Warwick, and has issue, Alice (see Marshall of Ward End).
Lineage—This family, whose pedigree is entered in the Heralds’ Visitations of London for 1568 and 1634, and in that of Herts for 1669, was long connected with the trade and commerce of the city of London. The first recorded ancestor is Thomas Hall, of Warnham, Sussex, who, by his wife, Margaret Pawthorne, had issue, Thomas, and John Hall, Merchant, Citizen, and Draper, of London, once Master of the Worshipful Company of Drapers, and twenty five years one of the Bridge Masters of the city of London [Stow’s Survey, 1633, p. 862). He to. 1st, Joane, dau. Of John Hall, and had Ami, Abraham, and Jane, wife of Richard Kilingbeck. He m. 2ndly, Dorothy Michell; and 3rdly, Anne, lau. of John Browne, Esq. of London, and Horton Kirby, Kent, and by her (who d. 17 Dec. 1619) had issue twenty-three children, many of whom d. young. He d. 19 Nov. 1618, and vas buried in the church of St. Nicholas Aeon, London, on the 16th of the said month. Of their surviving issue were i. John, – French Merchant, citizen and draper of London, bapt. (as
also his brothers and sisters) at St. Nicholas Aeon, 10 July, 1569, and buried there 30 Aug. 1644. He to. Sarah, only dau. if Sir Martin Lumley, Knt., Lord Mayor of London, ancestor if the Lumleys of Great Bardfteld, Barts, (extinct), and had * ssue ; ii. Humphrey, bapt. 6 Aug. 1570, to. for his 1st wife, Cicily (Barbara ?), dau. of Richard Middleton, Esq. Governor of Denbigh Castle, and sister to Sir Thomas Middleton, Knt., Mayor of London, and to Sir Hugh Middleton, Knt., with . whom he was concerned in bringing the New River water to London, and by her had issue; 1) Thomas, of whom presently ; iv. Anthony, bapt. 9 June, 1583, Customer of Carrick, Ireland, 1619, to. and left issue ; v. Daniel, bapt. 12 Nlov. 1592, m. Margaret Sayre, of Kent, and had issue. The third son, Thomas Hall, bapt. 13 Dec. 1573, Citizen, Merchant, and Haberdasher of London, buried at St. Nicholas Aeon, 13 March, 534; m. Bennet, dau. of Thomas Green, Gent, of London, and of Bois Hall, Essex, and by her (whom. 2ndly, Richard Beresford, of London, Merchant, and d. circa 1657) had, with two daus. (who d. young), Thomas, d. unm. John, d. unm. Daniel, d. Unm- Humphrey, bapt. at Nicholas Aeon, 19 Nov. 1620, of Goldings, co. Herts, signed the pedigree in the Visitation of Hertford, 1669 ; m. Dorothea, dau. of John Bridger, of London, Merchant (d. 1689). Humphrey Hall d. s. p. 12 Nov. 1695, and was buried at Bengeo, co. Herts. Daniel, bapt. at St. Nicholas Aeon, 4 Sept. 1627. The 5th son, Daniel Hall, m. Elizabeth, dau. Of Francis Quarles, of TJfford, co. Northampton, of the elder branch of the same family as Francis Quarles, the writer of “ The Emblems,” and dying Oct. 1666, left Thomas Hall, d. unm. on board the “James Galley,” 1682; and Daniel Hall, gunner of Tilbury Fort, Essex, and of Goldings, m. Mildred, dau. of Samuel Aistrop, of Lincoln, Mercer, and widow of John Bridges, and by her (who d: 12 July, 1712) had issue, with several others who d. Young, Thomas Hall, bapt. at Gravesend 11 July, 1692, of Goldings, m. Mary, dau. of James Hallett, Esq. of Dunmowe, Essex (eldest son of Sir James Hallett, of London, Knt.), by Mary his wife, dau. and co-heir of Sir Ambrose Crowley, Knt., who, through the Owens of Condover, Salop, Needhams, Viscounts Kilmorey, Talbots of Grafton, Butlers, Earls of Ormonde, and Bohuns, Earls of Hereford, of whom Humphrey de Bohun m. Lady Elizabeth Plantagenet, 5th dau. of King Edward I., was Nth in direct descent from that monarch. Thomas Hall d. 26 July, 1748, and was buried at Bengeo with his wife (who d. 24 March, 1742-43, aged 32), by whom he had issue, 1) Thomas, d. Young, 2) James, d. unm. At Lisbon, circa 1750. 3) Thomas, d. Young. 4). Humphrey, of Goldings, and of Manadon, Devon, Sheriff for Devon 1787, b. 15 July, 1738 ; m. 1767, the Hon. Jane, dau. of John, 10th Lord St. John of Bletsoe, and by her (who d. 10 July, 1799) had issue, 1 Elizabeth, m. 1st, 1803, Maine Swete Walrond, of Montrath, Devon, Col. Coldstream Guards ; and 2ndly, 1822, Sir William Elford, Bart., and d. 1839. 2 Jane (a twin with Lsetitia), m. 29 May, 1794, Robert Martin Popham Wall, Col. Oxfordshire militia, eldest son of Col. Wall, of Tewkesbury Lodge, co. Gloucester, and d. Dec. 1833. 3 Laetitia, m. at St. Mary’s, Southampton, 29 Sept. 1792, John Parlby, Esq., J.P., and d. 31 May, 1848, leaving issue (see Parlby of Manadon). 5) Ambrose, 6. 11 Sept. 1739; of whom presently. 6) Mary, m. 10 Jan. 1756, William Comber Kirkby, and d. 22 June, 1816. 7) Mille, d. young. hi. Elizabeth, d. unm. 1785. 8) . Sarah, d. Young. 9) . Anne, m. Richard Gough, Esq. of Enfield, the celebrated Antiquary, and d. s. p. 18 Aug. 1834. 10) Sarah, to. the Rev. Henry Pleydell Ryves, Vicar of Elstead, Surrey, and d. s. p. 30 March, 1795 (see Ryves of Shroton House). The 5th son, Ambrose Hall, of London, Merchant of Sutton, Surrey, and of The Hermitage, Walton-on-the-Hill, Surrey, to. 18 July, 1762, Ann, dau. and co-heir of Haslett Powell, and by her (who d. 27 Jan. 1812) had issue, James, of the parish of St. Olave Jewry, London, d. s. p. 1790. Humphrey, of whom presently. John Meggott, b. 1770 ; to. Mary Caslake, and d. s. p. 26 Feb. 1850. The 2nd son, Humphrey Hall, Esq. of The Hermitage, Walton-on-the- Hill, b. 18 April, 1763; d. 24 Aug. 1848, and was buried at Sutton, Surrey. He to. Maria Jane, dau. Of Thomas Nordaby, and by her (who d. 5 March, 1865) had issue, Ambrose William (Rev.), now of Walton-on-the-Hill. Richard Gough, bapt. at Walton-on-the-Hill, 3 Sept. 1815. Arms—Arg., three talbots’ heads erased sa., langued gu., between nine cross crosslets of the last. Motto—Esto quod esse videris. Residence—Walton-on-the-Hill, Epsom, Surrey.

HALL OF SCORBRO’.
Hall, John, Esq. of Scorbro’, Yorkshire, b. 1835 ; m. 1862, Mary Amelia, eldest dau. Of William Bradley Wainmain, Esq. of Carr Head, co. York, s. his father, 9 July, 1877.
Lineage—James Hall, Esq. of Scorbro’ Hall, co. York, b. March, 1801 ; to. Jan. 1830, Sarah, dau. of Richard Watt, Esq. of Bishop Burton, Beverley, and d. 9 July, 1877, leaving with other issue, the present John Hall, Esq. of Scorbro’ Hall. Seal—Scorbro’ Hall, Beverley.

HALL OF WHATTON MANOR.
Hall, Thomas Dickinson, Esq. of Whatton Manor, and of Broughton, co. Nottingham, J.P. and D.L., High Sheriff 1843, b. 18 Aug. 1808 ; m. Sophia Elizabeth, dau. of James Haffenden, Esq. of Homewood, Kent, and has issue, 1) Cecil Haffenden, Capt. Scots Fusilier Guards, to. 1869, Mary Caroline Georgina, eldest dau. of the late Anthony Willson, of Rauceby, Lincolnshire, and d. 20 Aug. 1874, leaving one son, Montagu Haffenden. 2) Frederick Dickinson (Rev). 3) Reginald Allgood, 53rd regt., to. 1876, Jane Elizabeth, dau. of Henry Robinson, Esq. of The Cliff, Wensleydale, and has a son, Henry Robinson, 6. 1876. 4) Thomas Kenrick (Rev.), Vicar of Whatton, co. Notts. 5) . Maurice James. vi. Edward Algernon. 6) Alice Elizabeth. 7) Gertrude Harriett, to. 1875, Herbert Edlmann, Esq., son of the late Joseph Edlmann, of Hawkwood, Kent. 8) Edith Sophia. iv. Mary Constance.
Lineage.—This family came originally from Lincolnshire. Thomas Hall, left by Sarah his wife, an only surviving child, Francis Hall, to. Miss Mary Watson, only child and heir of an opulent London Merchant, and had a son and successor, Thomas Hall, Esq. of Nottingham and of Whatton, co. Notts, to. Elizabeth Phillips, and by her had two sons, i. Thomas, an officer 7th Royal Fusiliers; to. Margaret Raines, a lady from the co. Cork, but d. s. P. ii. William Henry, an officer in the 4th or King’s Own regt., to. Nov. 1807, Harriet, eldest dau. of William Dickinson, Esq. of Muskham Grange (many years Chairman of Quarter Sessions for Notts), by Harriett his wife, eldest dau. Of John Kenrick, Esq., formerly M.P. for Bletokingley, and had . issue, 1) Thomas Dickinson, now of Whatton Manor. 2) Elizabeth Harriett. Mr. Hall d. 1 Oct. 1835. Arms—Az., a bend between three talbots’ heads erased, two in chief and one in base arg., on a chief or, three roses gu. barbed and seeded ppr. Crest—A crescent arg., surmounted by a griffin’s head erased sa., in the beak three ears of wheat or. Motto—Persevere. Seat—Whatton Manor, Nottingham.

HALL OF NARROW WATER.
Hall, William James, Esq. of Narrow Water, co. Down, J.P. and D.L. co. Down, late Major R..A., High Sheriff co. Down, 1878, b. 16 Sept. 1835 ; m. 1st, Dee. 1863, Elizabeth Theodosia Catherine, 2nd dau. of late Rev. Wm. B. Forde, of Seaforde, co. Down, and by her (who d. May, 1866) has issue, 1) Roger, 6. 4 Nov. 1864. 2) William Charles, 6. May, 1866. He m. 2ndly, 28 April, 1875, Florence Selina, youngest dau. of late George Brooke, Esq. of Ashbrooke, co. Fermanagh, by Lady Arabella his wife, and has issue, 3) Francis, 6. 19 Feb. 1876. Lineage—This family is of English extraction. William Hall settled in Ireland in the 17th century, and d. at Red Bog, co. Antrim, 1640; his son, Francis Hall, Esq. of Mount Hall, co. Down, to. Mary, dau. of Judge Lyndon, and had issue, Roger Edward (see Hall of Mainwarra), Alexander Trevor, and a dau., Frideswid, to. 1681, Chichester Fortescue, Esq. of Dromiskin. The eldest son, Roger Hall, Esq. of Mount Hall, m. 1686, Christian, dau. of Sir Toby Poyntz, of Acton, co. Armagh, and had issue, Toby, his heir; Roger; and Rose, m. 1708, Richard Close, Esq. The son and heir, Toby Hall, Esq. of Mount Hall, m. 1712, Margaret, dau. of the Hon. Robert Fitzgerald, and sister of the 19th Earl of Kildare, and by her (who d. 8Dec. 1758), he left at his decease, 4 May, 1734, two daus., Christian and Elizabeth, and one son, Roger Hall, Esq. of Mount Hall, m. 10 Sept. 1740, Catherine, only dau. of Rowland Savage, Esq. of Portaferry, and had issue, Savage, his heir ; Dorcas, to. Francis Carleton, Esq. ; Anne, m. Patrick Savage, Esq. of Portaferry; Catherine, m. 1765, the Right Hon. William Brownlow, M.P. ; Elizabeth, to. James Moore, Esq. ; Sophia, to. Richard Ainsworth, Esq. The son and heir, Savage Hall, Esq. of Narrow Water, 6. 1763; m. 1786, Elizabeth, 4th dau. of John Madden, Esq. of Hilton, co. Monaghan, and by her (who d. 1801) had issue, 1) Roger, his heir, of Narrow Water. ii. Savage (Rev.), Rector of Loughall, 6. 1798; m. 1831, Anne, eldest dau. of the late William James O’Brien, Esq. of co. Clare, and d. 1851, leaving issue, 1 Savage, 89th regt. b. 1834, d. 1868. 2 William James, now of Narrow Water. 3 Roger, 6. 1840, Capt. 14th regt. 1 Margaret Barbara, to. 1858, William Orme, Esq. of Owenmore, co. Mayo, who d. Sept. 1876. 2 Elizabeth Grace, to. 1860, Lieut.-Col. H. C. Moore. 3 Annette. 4 Alice. 5 Emily, d. 1865. m. Samuel Madden, late of Narrow Water. i. Anne, to. Trevor Corry, Esq. of Newry, and d. 1852. 2) Catharine, to. Capt. Nowlan, deceased. 3) Elizabeth, to. the Rev. W. B. Savage, d. 1867. 4) Jane, to. the Rev. Sir Hunt Johnson Walsh, Bart. The eldest son, Roger Hall, Esq. of Narrow Water, J.P. and D.L., High Sheriff co. Armagh 1815, and for Down 1816 ; b. 6 Nov. 1791 ; to. 10 Nov. 18.12, Barbara, 4th dau. of Patrick Savage, Esq. of Portaferry, co. Down. He d. 20 Sept. 1864, and his wife d. June, 1853. His younger brother, Samuel Madden Hall, Esq. of Narrow Water, J.P. and D.L., Major 75th regt., 6. 1800; to. 24 Sept. 1845, Anne Margaret, youngest dau. of Andrew Savage Nugent, Esq. of Portaferry, and d. 17 Feb. 1873, when he was s. by his nephew, the present, William James Hall, Esq. of Narrow Water. Arms—Arg., a chevron engrailed between three talbots’ heads erased sa. Crest—A bear’s head muzzled ppr. Seat—Narrow Water, Warrenpoint, co. Down.

HALL OF MAIRWARRA.
Hall, Henry Thomas, Esq. of Mairwarra, co. Galway, and Merville, co. Dublin, b. 1859 s. His grandfather 1875.
Lineage—Edward Hall, Esq. of Strangford, 2nd son of Francis Hall, Esq. of Mount Hall (see preceding Article), to. Anne Rowley, and d. 1713, leaving issue. The 2nd son, Rowley Hall, Esq. of Killeludagh, to. Miss Tipping, and was father of TheVen. Francis Hall, LL.D., Rector of Arboe, co. Tyrone, successively Praecentor and Archdeacon of Kilmacduagh and Vicar-General of that diocese, to. circa 1780, Christian Trail, and dying circa 1834, left (with other issue, deceased), 1) James Trail, Barrister-at-Law, Chairman of the cos. Of Galway, Monaghan, and Cavan, to. Aug. 1818, Anne Cockerell, only child of John Moubray, Esq., grandson of John Moubray, Esq. of Cockairny, co. Fife, and d. 21 Nov. 1836, leaving by her (who d. 2 Aug. 1855) issue, 1 Francis Henry (Rev.), Ineumbent of Drumcullin, co. Down, b. 23 Aug. 1820 ; to. 1st, 27 March, 1849, Mary Letitia, 2nd dau. of Rev. James McCreight, Rector of Keady, co. Armagh, and has issue, James Traill (Rev.), of Honley, Huddersfield, 6. 14 Aug. 1850. Francis Hemy, 6. 2 March, 1852. John Moubray, b. 23 Dec. 1853. William Thomas, b. 18 Nov. 1855. Henry North George, b. 3 Oct. 1857. Rev. F. H. Hall to. 2ndly, 21 Dec. 1861, Louisa, dau. Of Wm. Henry Armstrong, Esq., M.P., of Mount Heaton, King’s Co. 2) James Trail, Lieut.-Col. N. Down Rifles, m. 19 May, 1877. Isabella, widow of Col. Keatinge, Royal Dragoons, i 3) Thomas Erskine Arthur, m. Lady Margaretta Louisa, I dau. of the Earl of Castle Stewart. 4) Clara Jane. 5) Henrietta Maria. m. Henry (Lieut.-Gen. Hall), C.B., of Mairwarra. ni. Francis Tipping, to. Anne Maria Waddington, and at his decease, left issue, 1 Henry Francis (Rev.); 1 Julia; 2 Anne Maria Christian; 3 Frances Erskine. 6). Jane Marian Christian. The second son, Lieut. Gen. Henry Hall, C.B., of Mainwavra, co. Galway, and Merville, co. Dublin, J.P., 6. 11 Sept. 1789; to. 3 Oct. 1827, Sarah, eldest dau. Of the late Gen. Fagan, Adjutant-Gen. of the Bengal army, and had issue, i. Henry Edward, Lieut. 13th regt., b . 19 Sept. 1831 ; served in the Crimea and India; to. 23 Nov. 1858, Annie, only child of Col. T. Moore, Bengal army, and d. Feb. 1869, leaving Henry Thomas, now of Mairwarra. Ii. Christopher James Traill, b. 1839; d. 1854. i. Eliza Margaret, m. 30 Jan. 1855, the Rev. Macnevin Bradshaw, only son of the late Robert Scott Bradshaw, Esq., Barrister-at-Law. n. Annie Jane. He d. 1875. Arms, &c.—Same as Hall of Narrow Water. Seats—Mairwarra, Athenry, co. Galway; and Merville, co. Dublin.

HALL OF PARK HALL.
Hall, Francis, Esq. of Park Hall, co. Nottingham, J.P. and D.L., High Sheriff in 1846, late Lieut. 7th Hussars, and formerly Capt. in the Sherwood Rangers, or North Nottinghamshire regt. Of Yeomanry Cavalry, b. 8 Dec. 1805 ; m. 1 March, 1832, Mary Anne, only dau. and heiress of Joseph Bilbie, Esq., of Blidworth, co. Nottingham, which lady d. Aug. 1877.
Lineage—This family claim to be descended, through a younger branch, from the ancient House of Hall, of Grantham, co. Lincoln, and bear the same arms. Gervase Hall, the representative of this branch in the time of Queen Elizabeth, m. Anne, dau. of Humphrey Houghton, Esq., by whom he had, with other issue, a son, John Hall, of Nettleton Hall, co. Lincoln, who was father, by Mary Hollis his wife, of Joseph Hall, of Nettleton Hall, who to. a lady named Fox, by whom he had a son, Joseph Hall, of Nettleton Hall, 6. 1657 ; m. 1696, Catherine, dau. and co-heiress of the Rev. George Pigott, Rector of Ordsall, co. Nottingham, and d. 21 Sept. 1713, having had issue five sons and three daus. The second son, John Hall, Esq., 6.26 Feb. 1699; sold Hatfield Peverell, Essex, and Nettleton Hall, co. Lincoln, and purchased afterwards Woodhouse and Park Hall from the Digbys. He served as High Sheriff of Nottingham 1757 ; m. Hester, dau. of Bazeleel Brownsmith, Esq. Citizen and Merchant of London (who d. 12 Jan. 1761) and

THE HALL FAMILY OF WEST RIVER AND KINDRED FAMILIES
The Hall family is a very old one in England. Tradition tells us that the first Hall came over from Normandy, with William the Conqueror, at the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066. The first one who crossed the Channel with William, was called de Halle, signifying of the Hall, therefore they were close to the ruler. In other words they were personal or body guards. The name gradually became Angelicized to Hall. According to Mrs. Hattie Perkins Marine, who I think is descended from Benjamin Hall, son of Rev. Henry Hall, “This English branch trace origin to Thomas del Hall of Norley, grandson of John de Aula de Kingsley, Norleigh, A.D., 1216. This Thomas del Hall married Margery, daughter of Sir William de Brereton, Knight of Brereton Castle, County Chester; and had a son named for him, who married Mary, daughter of Sir Peter le Roter de Thornton, of Thornton.
“John del Hall, the second, of Norley, married the daughter of Sir Rozer Maynwaryngl, Knight and escheater of Cheshire; and had a son Thomas Hall. He in the year 1500, tore down the ancestral Castle and rebuilt it. He was Colonel of a regiment, raised among his tenantry, with which he marched against the Northumbrian rebels in 1569. Thomas Hall married the co-heiress of Sir John Egerton, of Egerton Hall and Oulton Park, County Chester. Mr. Hall left large estates for the poor of Norley, and the surrounding county. His grandson Peter, who as a Royalist Malignant, was obliged to compound for his estates, by paying a heavy fine to the Commonwealth. Thornton Hall of Horsham was the father of Henry Hall.” Mrs. Marine is wrong in saying that Thornton Hall was the father of Rev. Henry Hall, his father was Robert Hall. You will see later on, that I have absolute proof of this. I do not know where Mrs. Marine obtained this data. Nor do I know whether it has been verified. I cannot say that it is correct, and that we are descended from this particular line.
It is possible that Thornton Hall was an uncle of Rev. Henry Hall. There are two points in favor of Mrs. Marine’s contention. The first is that she is descended from Benjamin Hall, and that the name Thornton comes down through the Benjamin Hall line. It is possible that he might have carried it on, from his English uncle. Another point is, that in a book I had on the Hall families of England; (which I regret to say was out of print, when it was burned in Lochlea house in 1925) gives the Halls of Horsham, the right to the Coat of Arms. This shows that they must have at least been Knights. Also both Thornton Hall, and Robert Hall, Rev. Henry Hall’s father, were from Horsham. I feel that there is enough probability in Mrs. Marine’s theory to record it here. I will leave it to the reader to decide.
There are twenty-six distinct families of Halls in England. Our immediate branch comes from the Halls of Sullington and Horsham. Horsham is a charming English town, about thirty miles south of London, in Sussex; just below Epsom Downs, where the celebrated English Derby is run.
When I was married in 1910, I visited Horsham, and in Saint Mary’s, the Parish Church of Horsham, I found the baptismal record of Henry, the son of Robert and Ann Craig Hall. Henry was born June 17, 1676, and baptised June 29, 1676. Saint Mary’s Church is a lovely Gothic Church of the Thirteenth Century. Anyone interested in the Hall family who happens to be in London, should take the time off and visit this lovely spot; they would be well repaid.
Henry graduated from Peterhouse, Cambridge University, at the age of twenty-one. Mr. Percy Skirvin in his book, entitled, “The First Parishes of the Province of Maryland” says on page 126 that Rev. Henry Hall was Rector of Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, 1695 to 1697; and on page 127, Rev. Henry Hall officiated in All Saints Parish, Calvert County, in 1694. From this one is led to believe that he officiated, as a clergyman at the tender age of eighteen years. I know people matured early in those days but I could not think that they matured quite that early. So I wrote to Mr. Skirvin, asking him where he obtained his data. He referred me to photostatic copies of Rev. Ethan Allen’s manuscripts, now in the Episcopal Library, in the Peabody Institute, Baltimore. I went to Baltimore and examined the papers myself. I found that in that point Mr. Skirvin was correct. Still I was not satisfied, and felt, that although Rev. Ethan Allen is considered one of the best authorities on early Maryland church history, he must have erred in this particular case.
Wishing to be absolutely correct, I wrote to Peterhouse, Cambridge University; and received the following extract from “Admissions to Peterhouse, 1615 to 1911.” “Feb. 20, 1693. Henricus Hall, Sussexiensis, in Schola publica de Horsham educatus, annosque natus 18 examinatur et approbatur per Praefectum et Decanos; Admittiturque in ordinem Sizatorum, sub Tutore et fidejuss. Mro Bickerton. B.A. 1697.”
After a good deal of trouble to my friends, and with the help of a Mediaevalist Latin Scholar, of Johns Hopkins University, I was able to obtain the following translation: “Henry Hall of Sussex, educated in the public schools of Horsham, aged 18 years, examined and approved, by the Perfect and Deacons; admitted as a Sizatorum, (a scholar paying reduced fees and formerly charged with certain menial offices) sponsored and guaranteed by Mr. Bickerton. Received his B.A. 1697.” This establishes beyond the shadow of a doubt, that he did not graduate until 1697, and therefore, could not have officiated at either All Saints or Christ Church, prior to that date.
I also received the following data, from the Public Record Office, in London. From the Calendar of Treasury Books, October 1697 to August 1698, Page 214, under date of January 11, 1697/8, there is calendared a Money Warrant for 20 pounds, each to Henry Hall and other persons named, “as royal bounty for the charges of their exploration to Maryland, whither they are going as Chaplains.” The Money Order thereon is dated January 14, 1697/8.
As that was the before the calendar was changed, he received the money for his passage to Maryland, on January 14, 1698, evidently sailing to Maryland sometime after that. This bears ou the family tradition, that he arrived in Maryland, in the spring of 1698.
From the records of the province we find that he was sent to Maryland, by Henry, Lord Bishop of London. On May 7, 1698 under the mandate of Francis Nicholson, Governor of the Province of Maryland, was formally inducted as the first Rector of Saint James Parish. He became Rector of Saint James, before he was twenty-two years old. ………………

Early American Immigration and New World Settlers
Hall Settlers in United States in the 17th, 18th, 19th & 20th Century
Georg Hall, who landed in Virginia in 1620
Hugh Hall, who landed in Virginia in 1623
Christopher Hall who settled in Virginia in 1623
Edward Hall, who settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1630
Edw Hall, who arrived in Virginia in 1635
Anthony Hall, who arrived in Virg,inia in 1701
Edward Hall, who landed in Virginia in 1705
Egram Hall, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1730
David Hall, who landed in America in 1743
Clement Hall, who landed in North Carolina in 1744
Adam Hall, who landed in America in 1801
Aric Hall, whose Oath of Allegiance was recorded in Pennsylvania in 1803
Aric Hall, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1803
Alexander Hall, who landed in Connecticut in 1811
Hobert Hall, who arrived in New York, NY in 1811
Frederick Hall, who landed in Mobile, Ala in 1903
Charley Fredrick Hall, who landed in Wisconsin in 1912
Hall Settlers in Canada in the 18th & 19th Century
Conrad Hall, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749-1752
Abner Hall, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1760
Barnabas Hall, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1760
Christian Henr. Hall, one of the Hessian troops in the American War for Independence who settled in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1781
Mr. Richard Hall U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on October 26, 1783 was passenger number 268 aboard the ship “HMS Clinton”, picked up on September 28, 1783 at Staten Island, New York
Robert Hall, aged 26, a farmer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the brig “Thomas Hanford” from Cork, Ireland
Mary Hall, aged 25, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the brig “Thomas Hanford” from Cork, Ireland
Robert Hall, aged 3, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the brig “Thomas Hanford” from Cork, Ireland
James Hall, aged 25, a merchant, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship “John” from Liverpool, England
Mary Hall, aged 25, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the barque “Frederick” from Liverpool, England
Hall Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
George Hall, English convict from Sussex, who was transported aboard the “Ann” on August 1809, settling in New South Wales, Australia
Catherine Hall, British convict from Britain, who was transported aboard the “Alexander” on November 4, 1815, settling in New South Wales, Australia
John Hall, English convict from Lancaster, who was transported aboard the “Almorah” on April 1817, settling in New South Wales, Australia
William Hall, English convict from Nottingham, who was transported aboard the “Adamant” on March 16, 1821, settling in New South Wales, Australia
George Hall, English convict from Surrey, who was transported aboard the “Albion” on May 17, 1823, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia
Hall Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
William Hall, who landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1840
Henry Hall, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
John Hall, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
John Hall, who landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1840
Joseph Hall, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840

Mottoes
Aut pax aut bellum. Either peace or war.
Comitate quam viribus. By mildness rather than force.
Cura quietem. Seek repose.
Finem respice. Consider the end.
Fortitudine. With fortitude.
Per ardua ad alta. Through straits to heights.
Remember and forget not.
Turpiter desperatur. Despaired is base.
Vive ut vivas. Live that you may live.

Grantees
HALL, Anthony, of Hampshire, gent., grant, by G. Dethick, Gart., 15 Feb., 6 Ed. VI., 1551-2. Harl. MS. 1359, fo. 61 ; copy of grant, Q’s Coll. Oxf. ]\IS. 39, fo. 42 ; Grants I., 176.
HALL„ Anthony, by Cooke, Clar. Stowe MS. 670, fo. 23.
HALL„ Bartholomew, of Ipswich, Suff., s. of Tho®, clerk of the Hanaper office in Chancery, s. Of Thos., of Shirburn, Yorks, Crest 8 Feb. 1587-8, by Flower, Norr., and to the descendants of his grandfather. MS. Ashm. 844, fo. 74, pedigree and copy of patent, Bodleian Lib. ; Stowe MS. 677, fo. 32 ; Gnil. 344.
HALL,, Edward, of Bybrooke, par. of Kennington, Kent, 1588, by Cooke. Harl. MSS. 1359, fo. 113, and 1422, fo. 92 ; Her. and Geneal., ii., 431, of Wellesborongh, Kent, 1583. See .John, 1599, below. Add. MS. 4966, fo. 84’’.
HALL„ John, s. of Amery, of Salford, co. Lane., gent., gift at London 4 Nov. 1533, by Wriothesley and Tonge. Add. MS. 26,702, fo. 75’’ ; Harl. MS. 1359, fo. 41 ; (Add. MS. 14,295, fo. 73, assigns this coat to Thomas Hall of Middle Walton, Yorks) ; Harl. MS. 6140, fo. 67’’.
HALL„ John, of Everse, Salop …. coat and crest …. Barker’s Grants, Harl. MS. 5846, fo. 48” ; Stowe MS. 692, fo. 53”.
HALL„ John, the elder, of Wilsborongh, Kent, and Edward, of Ashford, his kinsman, 27 June 1599, by W. Dethick, Gart., and Camden. Visit. Kent (43), by J. J. Howard, in Archaeologia Cantiana, vol. vi., 252, copy of grant, Brit. Mus. See also Edward above.
HALL„ Joseph, S.T.D., Bp. of Exeter, 12 May 1631, by R. St. George, Clar. Misc. Gen. et Her., 2nd S., vol. iii., p. 9, plate ; I. 23, fo. 67, Her. Coll. ; Add. MS. 14,295, fo. 67”, as Joshua.
HALL„ Nicholas, B.D., of Devonshire, treasurer of St. Peter’s Cathedral, 20 March 1684-5, by Sir W”’ Dugdale and Clar. Harl. MS. 6834, fo. 178 ; Grants III.,fo. 260 ; Lansd. MS. 867, fo. 52.
HALL„ Sarah, relict of Joseph, late of London, merchant., who died in the West Indies (sister of Sir Nath’ and Sir Joseph Hearne, Kts., dec*’), etc. (mar*’ to Sir W”’ Hodges, bart.), and her two dans., Sarah, Lady Hodges, and AP® Susanna Cottle, 20 Sept. 1699, b3 ‘ T. St. George, Bart. and Clar. Grants IV., 313 or 315 ; Stowe MS. 714, fo. 95.
HALL„ William, see Wall.
HALL, John, Mayor of Norwich, co. Norf., 30 April 1716, Vol. VI, fol. 249.
HALL,, John, of London, Haberdasher of Small Wares, and of Horton Hall, Bucks. (2 Nov.) 1720, Vol. VII, fol. 27 ; Add. MS. 14,830, fol. 149.
HALL, late SHEPPARD, William, of Longfield, co. Kent ; Chatwell and Hopton Wafers, Shropsh. ; and Kidlington, co. Rutland, nephew of William Hall, 172 . ., Vol. VII, fol. 448.
HALL, Thomas, of Moundsmere and Preston Candover, Harapsh., 1767, Vol. XI, fol. 232. (Berrv.)
HALL„ William, of Skirwith, co. Cumberland, and St. Stephen Coleman, Loudon, 18 May 1768, Vol. XI, fol. 280.
HALL to Wharton, William, of Gilling and Skelton, co. York, and Ireland, sou of [J. W.] Hall Stevenson, 180 . ., Vol. XXIV, fol. 342.
HALL„ to WHARTON, Maj.-Gen. James, of Skelton Hall, co. York, son of [J. W.] Hall Stevenson, 180 . ., Vol. XXIV, fol. 344. [See Burke’s Landed Gentry’.]
HALL, . . . ., wife of King, of Bridgetown, Barbados. Arms for self and descendants. (See also Hall-Dauf.-.) 181 . ., Vol. XXIX, fols. 132 and 133.
HALL„ John, s. of Gen. Thomas, s. of Joseph, of City of Durham, and sister Elizabeth Anne [.^], only dau. of Gen. Thomas Hall, of Weston Colville, eo. Camb., and co. Durham, (Elizabeth, only sister of the grantee, was wife of John Morse, of Mount Ida, co. Norf.) [aud their respective descendants]. Match, [1815] Vol. XXIX, fol. 214.
HALL„ John, Charles, Elizabeth, Charlotte, Anne, Lydia, natural children of John Hall, 181 . ., Vol. XXIX, fols. 234 to 244. (.See also 187 . ., Vol. LVIII, fol. 142 ; name (and Arms of) Hall in lieu of PaiUvER, and Bullock to Hall.) ., A\’illiani, sable, two bars ermine aud in chief a lion’s head erased between 2 chaplets or (Her. Coll.), 172 . ., Vol. VII, fol. 448.
HALL„ James, C.B., Post-Capt., B.N., 181 . ., Vol. XXIX, fol. 388.
HALL„ Jane, wife of Sir Edward Codrington. of Sutton Park, co. Bedf., and Jamaica, 182 . ., Vol. XXXIII, fol. 102.
HALL„ Jasper Taylor, of Sutton Park, eo. Bedf., and his aunt Jane, Lady-Courington. (See last entry.) 182 . ., Vol. XXXIII, fol. 102.
HALL„ Sir Benjamin, of Abercarne, co. Monmouth, aud Wales (afterwards Baron Llanover), 182 . .,* Vol. XXXIV. fol. 380. (Crisp, IV, p. 31.)
HALL„ . . . ., of Trinidad, 182 . ., Vol. XXXIII, fol. 333.
HALL„ Robert Westlev, of Ilford Lodge, co. Essex, 182 . ., Vol. XXXIV, fol. 94.
HALL„ „ „ of Ilford Lo<lge,co.Essex,1823,Vol.XXXlV,fo!s.96aud 100.
HALL-DARE, ,. „ of Ilford Lodge, co. Essex, and Wyefield, Cranbrook, co. Kent, 1823, Vol. XXXIV, fol. 100.
HALL, late O’Toole, . . . ., of Holly Bush, co. Staff., 183 . ., Vol. XL, fol. 153.
HALL„ late Adcock, Thomas, of Workington iiud Carlisle, eo. Sunderland, 183 . .,
Vol. XLL fols. 343 and 344.
HALL, Thomas Dickinson, of Whalton Manor and Broughton, co. Nottingham, 183 . ., Vol. XLIII, fol. 70. (Crisp, VI, p. 108.)
„ John, of Northsceugh, Penn Whitton, co. Cnmlierhuid ; Rock House, Walton-on-the-Hill, co. Lane. ; and Mollance, Stewartry of Kirkcudbright, Scotland, 183 . ., Vol. XLIII, fol. 341.

alt='joseph_hall'

Joseph Hall (1574-1656)

Notables
Joseph Hall (1574-1656), an English bishop, satirist and moralist
George Hall (c.1613-1668), an English Bishop of Chester (1662-1668)
Thomas Hall (1610-1665), an English clergyman and ejected minister
Charles Hall (died 1669), an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1654
Lyman Hall (1724-1790), American physician, clergyman, and statesman, signer of the United States Declaration of Independence, Governor of Georgia (1783-1784)
Donald Andrew Hall Jr. (1928-2018), American poet, writer, editor and literary critic, awarded the Robert Frost Medal (1991), U.S. Poet Laureate (2006)
Harvey L. Hall (1941-2018), American businessman and politician, 25th Mayor of Bakersfield, California (2001-2017)
Roe Erister “Rick” Hall (1932-2018), American record producer, songwriter, music publisher, and musician best known as the owner of FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, winner of the Grammy Trustees Award in 2014
Jeffrey C. Hall (b. 1945), American geneticist and chronobiologist, co-awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (2017)
Monty Hall OC OM (1924-2017), born Monte Halparin, Canadian-born, American game show host and producer, best known as the host of the popular game show “Let’s Make a Deal”
Claude Hall (d. 2017), American journalist, writer and longtime radio-TV editor of Billboard
David Hall (1930-2016), American Democratic politician, 20th Governor of Oklahoma (1971-1975)

alt='David Hall (1930-2016)'

David Hall (1930-2016)

Barney Hall (1932-2016), American sports commentator for Motor Racing Network
David Hall (1875-1972), American Olympian who won bronze for 800m run at the 1900 Summer Games

American Revolution Veterans
There were over 14,000 men that served in the American Revolution with the Hall surname. Below you will find just a few of these men.
Obed Edom Hall, New Hampshire, Rank of Private
Abner Hall, Connecticut, Rank of Corporal
Amos Hall, Connecticut, Rank of Private
David Hall, Delaware, Rank of Captain
Ebenezer Hall, Massachusetts, Rank of Corporal
Gideon Hall, New York, Rank of Sergeant
Hugh Hall, Virginia, Rank of Private
James Hall, Delaware, Rank of Sergeant
John Hall, Virginia, Rank of Sergeant
Jonathan Hall, New York, Rank of Captain
Jude Hall, New Hampshire, Rank of Corporal
Levi Hall, Vermont, Rank of Drummer
Nathaniel Hall, New Hampshire, Rank of Drummer
Parsivel Hall, Massachusetts, Rank of Surgeon
Samuel Hall, Connecticut, Rank of Corporal
Thomas Hall, North Carolina, Rank of Captain
Uriah Hall, New Jersey, Rank of Private

Civil War Veterans
There were over 44,000 men that served in the Civil War with the Hall surname. Below you will find just a few of these men.
Abner Hall, 1st Regiment, South Carolina Artillery, Confederate, South Carolina
Barnabas Hall, 27th Regiment, New Jersey Cavalry, Union, New Jersey
Charles Hall, 30th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Daniel Hall, 41st Regiment, Mississippi Infantry, Confederate, Mississippi
Edward Hall, 1st Regiment, Louisiana Cavalry, Union, Louisiana
Frank Hall, 122nd Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
George Hall, 8th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Confederate, Tennessee
Harrison Hall, 67th Regiment, New York Infantry National Guard, Union, New York
Isam Hall, 86th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Jackson Hall, Scogin’s Battery, Georgia Light Artillery, Confederate, Georgia
Karl Hall, 14th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Lorenzo Hall, 3rd Regiment, United States Colored Cavalry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Manville Hall, Brander’s Company, Virginia Light Artillery, Confederate, Virginia
Noah Hall, 151st Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Oliver Hall, 41st Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Param Hall, 36th Regiment, Texas Cavalry, Confederate, Texas
Quincy Hall, 61st Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Raphael Hall, 49th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Samuel Hall, 6th Regiment, Alabama Infantry, Confederate, Alabama
Tony Hall, 103rd Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Uriah Hall, 5th Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery, Union, New York
Virgil Hall, 4th Regiment, Kentucky Mounted Infantry, Confederate, Kentucky
William Hall, 128th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Yancy Hall, 55th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Confederate, Georgia
Zachariah Hall, 5th Regiment, West Virginia Cavalry, Union, West Virginia

Hall Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Hall blazon are the lion, talbot, chaplet and eagle. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and sable .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Many breeds of dog appear in coats of arms, reflecting their status as man’s closet companion. The talbot is a hunting dog akin to a terrier, and usually illustrated in a lifelike style and eager pose. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog In common with the other heraldic dogs, Wade suggests that their presence should suggest “courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68 Others might say we need look no further than a pleasure in the hunt and the affection for this sturdy breed.

Laurel appears in several forms in heraldry, beginning with the whole bush. through branches, sprigs and leaves. Wade, the noted heraldic author, reckons that the leaves represent “tokens of peace and quietness”, whilst branches, especially in pairs are in memory of some great triumph. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P125. The other major appearance of the laurel is in the form of the laurel wreath, also known as a chaplet. 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Laurel. This was worn as a token of victory by Roman emporers, and Wade futher suggests that a similar purpose is adopted in heraldic art.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P125.
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Laurel