Hall Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hall Family Coat of Arms

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Hall Coat of Arms Meaning

Hall Name Origin & History

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Hall Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Hall blazon are the lion, talbot, chaplet and eagle. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and sable .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Many breeds of dog appear in coats of arms, reflecting their status as man’s closet companion. The talbot is a hunting dog akin to a terrier, and usually illustrated in a lifelike style and eager pose. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog In common with the other heraldic dogs, Wade suggests that their presence should suggest “courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68 Others might say we need look no further than a pleasure in the hunt and the affection for this sturdy breed.

Laurel appears in several forms in heraldry, beginning with the whole bush. through branches, sprigs and leaves. Wade, the noted heraldic author, reckons that the leaves represent “tokens of peace and quietness”, whilst branches, especially in pairs are in memory of some great triumph. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P125. The other major appearance of the laurel is in the form of the laurel wreath, also known as a chaplet. 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Laurel. This was worn as a token of victory by Roman emporers, and Wade futher suggests that a similar purpose is adopted in heraldic art.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hall Name

Hall Origin:

Sweden, Scotland, Germany

Origins of Name:

The surname of Hall is considered to be a topographical surname. This means that those who bore this surname lived in or around a certain structure that was both prominent in their community, and a visible landmark to which the person could be recognized to hail from. In this case, the surname of Hall was given to those who resided in a large house (that was called a Hall) or was given to someone who worked at the Hall. In the case of the surname of Hall being occupational, for someone who worked in a large house, it was given first to the original bearer of the surname, and was then given to the son, who often followed his father’s career path. The surname then would have become hereditary. The surname of Hall is said to have been derived from the Old English, Pre 7th Century word “heall” which can be translated to mean “a large house” or “hall.” It is also possible that this surname of Hall was derived from the Old Germanic (later Anglo-Saxon) word “halla,” or possibly the Old Norse-Viking word of “holl.” All of these possible derivations can be translated to mean “a large house” or “a hall,” but the direct derivation from which this surname comes is unknown.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hally, Haill, Hallo, Hoall, Heall, Halli, Haila, Hallu, Holl, Haull

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hall can be found in the country of England. One person who was named Warin de Halla, who was mentioned in the Pipe Rolls of the county of Essex, in the year of 1178. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Henry II of England, who was known as “Henry Court-manteau,” “Henry Fitzempress,” and “Henry Plantagenet.” King Henry II of England ruled from the year 1154 to the year 1189. Other mentions of this surname in the country of England include Nichol de Hall, which was recorded as serving as The Duke of Albany in the year 1400. Those who bear the surname of Hall can be found throughout the country of England. The areas with the larger concentration of those who carry the surname of Hall are Cambridgeshire, Yorkshire, Essex, Cumberland, Northumberland, and Durham counties.

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hall in the country of Scotland was one William de Hall, who was said to have held lands in the city of Irvine, Scotland. This name was recorded in the year of 1426. Those who bear the surname of Hall can be found throughout the Scottish countryside. The areas with the largest concentration of those who carry this surname of Hall can be found in the counties of Glasgow and Edinburgh.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th Century, many European citizens began to migrate to the United States of America, which at that time was known as The New World, or The Colonies. The first person who bore the surname of Hall to make this journey successfully was one Georg Hall, who landed in the state of Virginia in the year of 1620. Hugh Hall arrived in the same state in the year 1623. Those who carry the surname of Hall can be found throughout America. The areas where there is a large concentration of Hall’s are in Georgia, Texas, New York, Kentucky, Illinois, California, Virginia, and Pennsylvania.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hall: United States 525, 028; England 88,713; Australia 41,356; Canada 30,411; South Africa 21,076; Jamaica 10,012; Scotland 6,478; Sweden 5,598; New Zealand 5,264; Wales 4,301

Notable People:

David Hall (1930-2016) who was the 20th Governor of Oklahoma from the year 1971 to the year 1975, and who was a Democratic politician from America

Barney Hall (1932-2016) who was a sports commentator from America who commentated for the Motor Racing Network

James Stanley “Jim” Hall (1930-2013) who was a jazz guitarist, composer, and arranger from America

Lieutenant-General William Evans Hall (1907-1984) who was a Commanding General Continental Air Command from the year 1957 to the year 1961, and who was an American

Brigadier-General Gene William Hall (1891-1951) who was an Executive Officer in the Caribbean Engineer Division from the year 1942 to the year 1944

Lieutenant-General Charles Philip Hall (1886-1953) who was the Director of the Organization& Training Division in the Department of the Army from the year 1947 to the year 1948

Sergeant Thomas Lee Hall (1893-1918) who was a soldier in the American Army who was honored with the Medal of Honor

David Hall (1875-1972) who was an Olympian from America who medaled in the 800m run in 1900, at the Summer Olympic Games, and who was awarded the bronze medal in this event

Hall Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hall family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Middleham, co. Bedford). Ar. a cross moline sa. in tho dexter chief a fleur-de-lis gu.
2) (Horton Hall, co. Bucks, and of London). Ar. on a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads erased az. a bezant.
3) (Lord Hanover; extinct 1867). Motto—Turpiter despe ratur. Per pale ar. and or, on a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads erased, their necks encircled with mural crowns, three hawks’ lures ppr. Crest—A griffin’s head or, with a hawk’s lure ppr. in the mouth and a palm branch vert behind.
4) (Warnham, co. Sussex, and London. Visit. London, 1589). Ar. semee of crosses crosslet and three talbots’ heads erased sa.
5) (Banbury, co. Oxford. Visit. 1634. Anthony Hall, of that place, great grandson of Richard Hall, of Stoarford, in same co., Judge of Assize, temp. Henry VII.). (Banbury, co. Oxford; Anthony Hall, great grandson of Richard Hall, of Swarford, same co. Visit. 1634). Ar. an eagle displ. gu.
6) (co. Cambridge). Az. an eagle displ. or.
7) (Haninsley, co. Cambridge). (Streatham, in the Isle of Ely) Ar. a chev. gu. fretty of the first, betw. three demi lions ramp. az. on a chief of the second as many chaplets or.
8) (Barton Hall, and Hollybush, co. Derby; Lorenzo O’Toole, Esq., of Ballyfod, co. Wexford, m. Harriett, dau. and heir of Hugh Hall, Esq., of Hollybush, and had a son, Lorenzo Kirkpatrick O’Toole, who assumed, by royal licence, the name and arms of Hall). Az. three talbots’ heads erased sa. betw. eight cross crosslets gu.
9) (co. Devon). Sa. a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads erased ar.
10) (co. Devon). Az. a chev. ar. betw. three chaplets or.
11) (co. Devon). Gu. a bend vair betw. six crosses crosslet ar.
12) (co. Devon). Ar. four lozenges in pale gu. on each a. leopard’s face or.
13) (co. Devon). Ar. a broad arrow gu. feathered or, betw. three harts’ horns of the third.
14) (Brittly, co. Durham). Ar. a chev. sa. fretty or, betw. three demi lions pass. az. on a chief gu. as many annulets of the first.
15) (Newsham, co. Durham). Ar. a chev. engr. az. betw. three talbots’ heads sa. on a chief of the second as many mullets of the first. Crest—A talbot’s head erased ar. gorged with a collar chequy or and az.
16) (co. Essex). Or, four bars sa. on three escutcheons ar. as many church bells of the second, clappers of the first.
17) (co. Essex). Sa. a lion ramp. ar.
18) (Exeter; granted 20 March, 1684). Sa. three talbots’ heads erased ar. collared gu. with rings on the collars or. Crest—A talbot’s head erased sa. eared ar. gorged with a chaplet or, garnished with roses gu.
19) (High Meadow, co. Gloucester). Ar. a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads erased sa.
20) (Kennington, co. Kent). Az. three halberts in pale or. Crest—A horse's head sa. in armour ppr. bridled and armed or, on the head two feathers, one az. the other gold.
21) (co. Lancaster). Ar. a chev. sa. fretty or, betw. three lions ramp. of the second, on a chief gu. as many roses of the third, barbed and seeded vert.
22) (co. Leicester). Gu. a lion ramp. guard or, crowned ar.
23) (cos. Lincoln and Middlesex, and Middle-Walton, co. York). Ar. a chev. sa. fretty or, betw. three demi lions ramp. az. on a chief gu. as many chaplets of the third. Crest—A dragon's head couped az. collared or.
24) (Grantham, co. Lincoln; Sir Henry Sutton, Knt., of Averham, co. Notts, temp. Henry VIII., m. Alice, dau. of Francis Hall. Visit. Notts). Ar. three talbots’ heads erased sa.
25) (Spalding, co. Lincoln). Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three talbots’ heads erased sa. a bordure gu.
26) (Grantham, co. Lincoln). Ar. on a chev. betw. three talbots' heads erased sa. as many estoiles or. Crest—A talbot's head erased or, pellettee.
27) (Grantham, co. Lincoln). Sa. three talbots’ heads erased ar.
28) (Gretford, co. Lincoln). Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three talbots' heads erased sa. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a plume of feathers ar. thereon a demi lion ramp. of the first.
29) (co. Lincoln, 1640). Ar. on a chev. engr. betw. three lions’ heads erased sa. an estoile or.
30) (co. Lincoln). Vert on a saltire engr. ar. five mullets gu.
31) (co. Lincoln). Same Arms, tinctures reversed, mullets or.
32) (Walton-on-the-Hill, co. Surrey). Motto—Esto quod esse videris. Ar. three talbots’ heads erased sa. langued gu. betw. nine cross crosslets of the last.
33) (Cilgwyn, co. Cardigan, and Greville House, co. Middlesex, lineally descended in direct line from the noble family of Fitzwilliam, by the branch Fitzwilliams, of the Hall (hence the name), settled at the Hall Place, co. Norfolk). Motto—Vive ut vivas. Some ancestors of the family bore in the 1st and 4th quarters, barry of twelve, five shields, and a talbot's head for crest. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, barry of eight gu. and erm. over all three escutcheons ar.; 2nd and 3rd, gu. on a chev. ar. betw. three talbots’ heads ppr. collared or, and langued gu. as many blue bells also ppr. Crest—A demi lion ramp. holding a flaming sword imbrued all ppr.
34) (Greatford Hall, co. Lincoln, Skelton Castle, co. York, and Wratling Park, co. Cambridge; of the Fitzwilliams, of Cliseby). (Arrow’s Foot, co. York, a branch of the Halls, of Greatford Hall). Ar. on a chev. engr. sa. betw. three talbots’ heads erased of the second an estoile or. Crest—A talbot’s head erased sa. spotted or.
35) (Backlands Park, co. Wilts). Motto—Esse quam videri. Ar. on a chev. betw. Three talbots' heads erased sa. an estoile or. Crest—A talbot's head erased sa. spotted or.
36) (Ashford, co. Kent; granted, 1583, by Cooke, Clarenceux). Ar. three halberts in fesse headed ppr. handles or. Crest—A horse's head couped sa. maned ar. bridled silver, tasselled gold, upon the head armour ppr. with a spilte upon the fore­head or, and therefrom issuant two ostrich feathers, the dexter gu. the sinister gold.
37) (Skipton, co. York; Edward Hall, citizen of London. Visit. 1668). Ar. a fess betw. two greyhounds courant sa. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi greyhound sa. collared gold.
38) (Sawforth and Harborough, co. Lincoln). Ar. a chev. betw. three demi lions ramp. gu. on a chief of the last as many chaplets or. Crest—A greyhound's head erased gu. collared or.
39) (Ore, co. Sussex). Gu. three talbots' heads erased ar.
40) (Rev. George Hall, D.D., Master of Pembroke College, Oxford). Ar. a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads erased sa. Crest—A talbot’s head, as in the arms.
41) Ar. a chev. sa. fretty or, betw. two columbincs ppr. Crest—A dove, in the beak an olive branch all ppr.
42) (co. York). Ar. a chev. betw. three talbots’ heads couped sa. Crest—A talbot’s head, as in the arms.
43) (cos. Berks and Oxford). Erm. five barrulets gu. over all three escutcheons or, a mullet for diif.
44) (Whatton Manor, co. Nottingham). Motto—Persevere. Az. a bend betw. three talbots’ heads erased ar. on a chief or, three roses gu. barbed and seeded ppr. Crest—A crescent ar. surmounted by a griffin's head erased sa. in the beak three ears of wheat or.
45) (Costock, co. Nottingham). Ar. a chev. engr. gu. betw. three talbots' heads erased sa.
46) (London; granted 18 May, 1768). Or, on a chev. sa. betw. three demi lions pass. az. five barrulets ar. on a chief gu. three chaplets of the fourth. Crest—A mural crown ar. thereout issuing a dexter arm embowed, habited az. fretty of the first, cuffed or, in the hand ppr. a dagger of the last, hilt and pommel gold.
47) (London). Or, on a chief sa. a cross moline fitchee of the field. Crest—A demi lion gu. supporting a cross moline fitchee or.
48) (London and Laventhorpe, co. York). Ar. a fesse betw. two greyhounds courant sa. collared or. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up ar. a greyhound sejant erm.
49) (London). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three talbots’ heads erased pean.
50) (London). Ar. three talbots’ heads erased sa. collared or, betw. five crosses crosslet gu.
51) (Hoxton, co. Middlesex; granted April, 1613). Az. on a chief erm. a lion pass. guard. of the field.
52) (co. Middlesex, and Northale and Kynersley, co. Salop; Har. MS. 1404). Gu. a wivern or, within a bordure az. charged with a verdoy of fleurs-de-lis, interlaced with an enurny of lions pass. of the second. Crest—On the stump of a tree couped or, a wivern, wings endorsed sa. collared, ringed, and lined of the first, the line reflexed over the back, grasping in the dexter claw a sword ar. hilt and pommel gold.
53) (co. Norfolk). Sa. a chev. ar. betw. three chaplets or. Crest—A demi buck saliant sa. attired or, gorged with a collar of the last charged with three chaplets of the first.
54) (Salisbury). Ar. on a chev. betw. three columbines az. stalked and leaved vert, a mullet of six points or.
55) (Henwick, co. Worcester, Rotheihithe, &c. Visit. Leicester, 1619). (Mathon, co. Worcester. Visit. Leicester, 1619). (Ar. three talbots’ heads erased sa. betw. nine crops crosslets az. Crest—A dragon's head couped az. collared ar.
56) (Redcriff, near London. Visit. Leicester, 1619). Same Arms and Crest, a crescent for diff.
57) (Bishop of Bristol, 1691-1710). Sa. three talbots’ heads erased betw. nine cross crosslets ar.
58) (Warnham, co. Sussex, Goldings, co. Herts, London, &c.). Ar. three talbots’ heads erased sa. betw. nine cross crosslets gu.
59) (Wilsborough, co. Kent; granted 27 June, 1599. Visit. Kent, 1619). Gu. three poleaxes in pale or. Crest—“A horshead coupe sables armed with Shafferon and brydeled argent, purfled or plumed gould and goules."
60) (co. Salop). Sa. billettee two bars erm. in chief a hound's head erased betw. two chaplets or. Crest—A buck’s head armed or, collared sa.
61) Same Arms. Crest—A demi buck saliant or, eared sa. gorged with a fesse wavy betw. two cotises of the last.
62) (co. Salop). Ar. on a chev. cotised gu. three chaplets or.
63) (Hermitage, co. Chester). Ar. three talbots’ heads erased sa. Crest—A talbot’s head sa.
64) (co. Somerset). Az. a chev. erm. betw. three chaplets or.
65) (South Newington and Banbury, co. Oxford, and co. Warwick). Ar. an eagle displ. gu. Crest—A demi eagle with wings endorsed sa. collared or.
66) (Moundesmere, co. Southampton; granted 1767). Paly of four or and az. on a bend ar. three human hearts ppr. each pierced with two arrows saltireways of the first. Crest—A demi wolf ar. in the dexter paw a hears, as in the arms.
67) (Waram, co. Sussex, and London; John Hall, Citizen. Visit. 1568). Ar. semee of crosses crosslet three talbots' heads erased sa.
68) (Captain James Hall, R.N.). Motto—Always ready. Ar. on a bend engr. az. betw. two anchors sa. three talbots' heads erased of the field. Crest—A dexter cubit arm in bend, vested az. semee of escallops ar. grasping a dagger sheathed, point downwards ppr.
69) (Ipswich, co. Suffolk; confirmed 8 Feb. 1587). (Coggeshall, co. Essex, and co. York). Erm. five barrulets gu. over all three escutcheons or.
70) (Coventry, co. Warwick). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three columbines slipped ppr.
71) (Bradford, co. Wilts). Sa. three poleaxes ar. Crest—An arm embowed in armour ppr. garnished or, holding a poleaxe ar.
72) (co. York). Sa. a chev. betw. three dexter hands couped ar.
73) Gu. a lion ramp. crowned or.
74) Per pale ar. and sa. a chev. betw. three dolphins embowed all counterchanged.
75) Gu. a lion ramp. or, crowned az.
76) Az. an eagle displ. or, ducally gorged ar.
77) Ar. three lozenges in pale gu.
78) Az. a chev. betw. three covered cups or.
79) Vert a chev. ar.
80) Per bend vert and or.
81) Ar. three piles sa.
82) Ar. three crosses crosslet fitchee in bend az. betw. two bendlets gu. Crest—A dove and olive branch ppr.
83) Or, on a bend sa. three chevronels of the first betw. two lions ramp. of the second.
84) Ar. a chev. and bend gu. on a canton of the second a crescent of the first.
85) Gu. a dragon displ. ar. on his breast an escutcheon purp. a bordure az. verdoy of fleurs-de-lis or.
86) (Clifton, co. York, and the Grange Hall, co. Chester; descended from the ancient family of Clifton, co. York, resident at Leeds, 1700; Scarborough, 1750; and Manchester; the late John Hall, Esq., of Mersey Bank House, Heaton Norris, and Manchester, co. Lancaster, a magistrate for that county and the borough of Stockport, who represented this family, and d. 1 Oct. 1843, was eldest brother of the present Vice-Chancellor Hall, present representative). Motto—Aut pax aut bellum. Sa. on a chev. betw. three dexter hands couped and erect, each within an annulet ar. a wreath of laurel vert betw. two roses barbed and seeded ppr. Crest—A tilting spear erect surmounted by a sword and laurel branch saltirewise all ppr.
87) Ar. four bars humettee gu. on the second a leopard's head or.
88) Erm. three lozenges gu.
89) Az. three eagles displ. ar.
90) Vert a griffin ramp. ar.
91) Ar. a chev. sa. fretty or, betw. three lions ramp. az. Crest—A dragon’s head couped az. collared or.
92) (Sir John Hall, K.C.B., M.D., Inspector-General of Hospitals, and Chief of the Medical Staff of the Army, son of late John Hall, Esq., of Littlebeck, Westmoreland). Motto—Perseverantia et cura quies. Or, on a pale betw. two battle axes erect sa. three talbots’ heads couped of the field. Crest—On a wreath the battlements of a tower, thereon a cock entwined by a snake all ppr.
93) (Westbank House, co. Chester). Barry of six erm. and vert on a chief az. a talbot’s head erased betw. two martlets or. Crest—A demi buck ppr. collared or.
94) (Newsham and Great Chilton, co. Durham; descended from the Halls of Greatford). (The junior branches of London, &c. bore the crest, collared counter-compony or and az. and the mullets in the arms ar.). Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three talbots’ heads erased az. on a chief of the second as many mullets or. Crest—A talbot’s head erased sa.
95) (Birtley, Conset, and Framwellgate, co. Durham, subsequently of Dublin, and of co. Antrim; afterwards of Bishop Wearmouth). (Greencroft; descended from Robert Hall, living in the fifteenth century). Or, a chev. sa. fretty of the first betw. three demi lions pass. az. on a chief gu. as many chaplets ar. a martlet for diff.
96) (Narrow Water, co. Down). (Mainwarra, co. Galway, and Merville, co. Dublin). Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three talbots’ heads erased sa. Crest—A bear’s head muzzled ppr.
97) (Ramelton, co. Donegal, and Barbadoes; allowed by Betham, 1810; granted to William Hall, Esq., of Sully co. Donegal). Motto—Cura quietem. Vert a chev. or, betw. three storks' heads erased ar. all within a bordure of the second charged with eight trefoils slipped of the first. Crest—On a mount a stork ar. holding in her dexter claw a pellet.
98) (Dunglass, co. Haddington, bart., 1687). Motto—Dat cura quietem. Az. a chev. ar. betw. three storks’ heads erased at the neck or. Crest—A stork standing on a mount in a watching posture ppr.
99) (London, cadet of Dunglass, 1787). Motto—Per ardua ad alta. Az. a chev. engr. ar. betw. two storks’ heads erased in chief and a saltire couped in base or, a bordure of the second. Crest—A demi griffin ppr.
100) (Fullbar, co. Renfrew, Scotland). Az. a fesse chequy or and gu. betw. three herons’ heads erased ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P125.
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Laurel