Hamlin Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hamlin Family Coat of Arms

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Hamlin Coat of Arms Meaning

Hamlin Name Origin & History

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Hamlin Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Hamlin blazon are the lion, spaniel, bars indented and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and ermine .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Dogs of all breeds are common in heraldry and are largely depicted in a realistic fashion for that species. The obviously have a role as “man’s best friend” and can demonstrate a passion for the pursuit of hunting, but may also occur as a play on words with the family name. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:dog (and others) Wade suggests that all dogs, of whatever breed should be taken as tokens of their “courage, vigilancy, and loyal fidelity”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). It is also possible to place decorative edges along bars, typically these are smaller than those found on the major ordinaries like the fess and pale, but have the same design and share the same meanings. An line drawn indented, i.e. in a saw-tooth pattern might be taken for dancettee, but in this case the individual “teeth” are much smaller. An early author, Guilllim seeks to associate this decoration with fire 16A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P39, and one can see the resemblance to flames.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hamlin Name

HAMLIN

Hamlin, is an old name thought to have originated in Germany and France. Originally the name evolved from the Hebrew name of Ham, the son of Noah from the Torah and Biblical tales of the world encompassing flood. It became Hamon. It is one of the few personal names which changed from a first name to a surname. In popular myth, Hamon was thought to have a meant ‘sun burnt’ or ‘dark,’ however scholarly translators believe this was a mistake and the surname of Hamlin, means ‘home.’ Ham is listed as the father to western Asia, and Africa according to the bible. It is also a name which garnered popularity with early crusaders returning from the holy land.

Surnames in Britain prior to the Norman conquest were largely unheard of. In the small settlements and villages which existed during earlier times, residents found little need for surnames as everyone in these communities knew each other and a given name would usually suffice. However, with the passage of time, population growth and expansions of communities as villages gave way to towns and cities, it became necessary to add a qualifier to a people’s names to distinguish them, one from another. Therefore one person may have been identified by their given name plus their occupation while another may have been identified by their given name and one of their parent’s names. The introduction of surnames by the Norman aristocracy after the invasion seemed to be the next logical step in this evolution. There was a boundless supply from which surnames could be formed, in addition to the use of patriarchal/matriarchal names or reference to the individuals occupation, there were things such as defining physical traits, a familiar geographical location or a topographical landmark found near the individuals home or birthplace, the name of the village in which the person lived, and so much more. Soon, surnames would come not just to represent an individual but whole families.

There often exists variations in spelling of many surnames, as with many given names which date back to the early centuries. The variation in spelling of both given and surnames during this time period can be attributed to a lack of continuity regarding guidelines for spelling which was compounded by the diversity of languages in use in European countries at this time. The variations in the spelling of the surname Hamlin include but not limited to Hamlen, Hamon, Hamlin and Hamblin, with many more variations existing still.

The first recorded instance of the surname being used, as a surname in England, was 1219 in the Devonshire tax census rolls of 1219. The next appearance of Hamlin, is in Germany in the Lower-Saxony village of Hamlin, where they commemorate the story of the “Pied Piper of Hamlin.” Local records show the story had some grain of truth, and was placed into the stained glass windows of the local church in 1300. The church did suffer a fire in the 17th century, but there is ample documentation recording their existence.

The Hamlyn surname is originally from Widecombe and Buckfastleigh, Richard Hamlyn received or purchased two manors at those two locations. The Hamlyn family during the medieval period were land owning farmers and, who were also soldiers, often referred to as English Yeomanry.

In 1395-97 Thomas Hamlyn took service with Sir Stephen Scrope as an archer, serving in Ireland for two years. The next entry is of Richard Hamlyn serving as a Man-at-Arms, in 1443, during the War of the Roses. His captain was Thomas Cusak, who was serving under the Duke of Somerset, John Beaufort. ( A man-at-arms during the War of the Roses period would have the same equipment as a knight. Only well to do landed gentry could afford to become a man-at-arms.)

The first recorded Hamlin to arrive in America landed in Barnstable, Massachusetts in 1639, his name was Jame Hamlin, from Devonshire. The second recorded Hamlin to arrive in New England is Giles Hamlin who is recorded as living in Hartford Connecticut in 1650. Boston Massachusetts also records a number of Hamlin surname bearers arriving in the 1650’s and the 1660’s. Which makes the Hamlin surname one of the earliest names to arrive on the North American shores.

Hamlin Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Gu. a lion ramp. erm. crowned with an antique crown or. Crest—Seven arrows, points upward ppr.
2) (Hamlinstown; Reg. Ulster’s Office). Ar. a chev. betw. three spaniels sejant gu.
3) (co. Leicester). Gu. a lion ramp. erm. ducally crowned or.
4) Ar. two bars indented gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:dog (and others)
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69
16. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P39