Hanford Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hanford Family Coat of Arms

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Hanford Coat of Arms Meaning

Hanford Name Origin & History

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Hanford Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hanford blazon are the mullet, bend wavy and chapeau. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.6The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. It can be further distinguished by embellishing the edges. The decorative edge pattern Wavy, sometimes written as undy is, for obvious reasons, associated with both water and the sea 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40. Indeed, a roundel with alternating bars of azure and argent (blue and white) is known by the shorthand term fountain, representing water at the bottom of a well 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water. Other colours have also been used and the result can be very pleasing to the eye.

The chapeau or cap of maintenance appears sometimes on the shield itself, but more often in the crest above it. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P139 In appearance it is typically of red velvet with trim of ermine. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:cap

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hanford Name

Hanford Origin:

England

Origins of Hanford:

According to the early recordings of the spelling of the surname, this interesting and unique name was listed in at least the four spellings such as Hanaford, Handford, Handforth, and Hanford. It is an English geographical surname. It acquires from either the hamlet of Hanaford in Devon, or Handforth in the district of Cheshire, or from a similar place called Handford, but was famous locally as Hanford, in Staffordshire. The meaning of the name in all situations is probably “Hana’s Ford,” with Hana being a first introduction name. However, “hana” also mentioned the cock bird, so it is possible that the place names relate to forts where for some reason they kept cock birds, probably fighting cocks. The surname was first noted in the 14th century, and other previous examples are Richard de Honford, in the Pipe Rolls of Cheshire, in 1398, and Richard Handforth of Godley, Cheshire in 1545. Next examples contained as Richard Hanford of Warwick in 1468, and John Handford of Devon, in 1642.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hanaford, Haniford, Hannford, Haneford, Hainford, Hanfford, Hanfordt, Hanoford, Haanford, Hanforde.

England:

The origins of the surname Hanford appeared in Cheshire where people held a family seat from earlier times. Some say better before the invasion of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings1066 A.D.

The very first recorded spelling of the family name was shown to be that of Simon de Hanford, dated about 1230, in the “Pipe Rolls of the division of Somerset.” It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Hanford had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Hanford landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Hanford who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Eglin Hanford at the age of 46, landed in New England in the year 1635.

The following century saw more Hanford surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Hanford who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Andrew Hanford, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851. Henry Hanford at the age of 23, arrived in Mobile, Ala in the year 1856. John Hanford at the age of 17, landed in New York in the year 1864.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hanford: United States 2,339; England 559; Wales 226; South Africa 110; Australia 89; Canada 73; New Zealand 50; Scotland 26; Spain 6; Iraq 2.

Notable People:

Benjamin “Ben” Hanford (1861 – January 24, 1910) was an American Democratic leader during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Cornelius Holgate Hanford (April 1849 – March 1926) was an American justice and the first United States Judge for the District of Washington, who retired his office under threat of impeachment. He was the younger brother of the newspaper editor, Thaddeus Hanford. The former agricultural community of Hanford, Washington was named for him.

Frank Hanford (January 1853 – November 1921) was an American leader and business man in the state of Washington. He was selected to the Seattle City Council in 1890 and the Washington House of Representatives in the year 1895.

Henry Hanford (1784–1866) was the first white settler of Lewistown, Ohio, United States.

James Madison Hanford (1827–1911) was an American railroad manager. The city of Hanford, California was called after him.

Jamie Hanford was born in May in the year 1975. He is an American lacrosse player who plays for the Rochester Knighthawks in the National Lacrosse League. He is famous as a face-off specialist; he was picked up by the Titans as a free agent after playing five seasons with the Colorado Mammoth.

Thaddeus Hanford, Jr. (1847–1892) was an American newspaper manager.

Hanford Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Watton, co. Lincoln). Gu. three mullets ar. Crest—A cubit arm erect, vested or, cuffed ar. holding in the hand ppr. an estoile gold.
2) (Wollashill; one of the, knightly families of co. Worcester, recorded in the first edition of Mr. Shirley's work, Noble and Gentle Men of England). Motto—Memorare novissima. (co. Chester). Sa. a star of eight rays ar. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a wivern of the first, wings expanded ar.
3) (co. Lincoln). Gu. a bend betw. six mullets ar.
4) (co. Somerset). Ar. two bends wavy sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P139
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:cap