Hare Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hare Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Hare Coat of Arms Meaning

Hare Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Hare. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

hare coat of arms

Hare Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hare blazon are the bars, chief and dragon. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and or.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). Bars can be a distinctive and easily recognised device, early examples include those awarded by Henry III of England to the family MAUDYT Argent, two bars gules.

The chief is an area across the top of the field 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40. It appears in many different forms and can itself be charged with other charges and ordinaries, 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief, being treated almost as if it were a completely separate area. In its simplest form it can be clearly identified. Early examples include the award by Henry III of England to the knight Robert de MORTEYN BRETON of Ermine, a chief gules.

Dragons have a long history in Heraldry and indeed have come to symbolise entire countries. Originally they were perhaps based on garbled descriptions of crocodiles given by returning travellers but soon developed a widely accepted representation. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin Wade suggests that their appearance signifies “a most valiant defender of treasure”, a trait of dragons that we are still familiar with today. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P86

Hare Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hare Name

William Hare was recorded in this position in the year of 1366.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hare: United States 19,137; England 6,829; India 2,814; Canada 2,574; South Africa 2,466; Australia 2,159; Kenya 863; Philippines 838; New Zealand 760; Scotland 591

Notable People:

Thomas Truxtun Hare (1878-1956) who was an Olympian from the United States of America who was awarded both silver and bronze medals for the decathlon and the hammer throw at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games, and who also placed at the 1900 Summer Olympic Games in these events

Raymond Hare (1901-1994) who served as an Ambassaor to Saudi Arabia from the year of 1950 to the year of 1953, and who was a Foreign Officer from the United States of America

Richard Mervyn Hare (1919-2002) who was a philosopher from the country of England

Clayton Hare (1909-2001) who was a teacher, violinist, and conductor from the country of Canada

J. Robertson Hare (1891-1979) who was a comedy actor from the country of England

Robery D. Hare CM (born in 1934) who was a researcher from the country of Canada who was most notably recognized for his renowned research in the criminal psychology field

Hare Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hare family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More hare Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Earl of Listowel). Motto—Odi profanum. Gu. two bars or, a chief indented of the last. Crest—A demi lion couped ar. ducally gorged or. Supporters—Two dragons erm. armed and langued gu. wings elevated and endorsed.
2) (Lord Coleraine; created 1625, extinct, with the third lord). Gu. two bars or, a chief indented of the last. Crest—A demi lion ramp. ar. ducally gorged gu. Supporters—Two dragons erm.
3) (Stow Bardolph, co. Norfolk, bart., extinct 1764). Motto—Non videri sed esse. Gu. two bars and a chief indented or. Crest—A demi lion ramp. ar. holding a cross crosslet fitchee gu.
4) (Stow Hall, co. Norfolk, bart.; Thomas Leigh, Esq., of Stow Hall, son of Thomas Leigh, Esq., of Irer, co. Bucks, and grandson of Thomas Leigh, Esq., of London, by Mary Hare, his wife, sister of the last bart. of Stow Bardolph, assumed the surname of Hare, and was created a bart. 1818). Motto—Non videri sed esse. (Docking Hall, co. Norfolk; a younger branch of Hare, of Stow). Same Arms. Crest—A demi lion ramp. ar. ducally gorged or.
5) (co. Norfolk). Same Arms. Crest—A demi lion ar. holding a cross patonce fitchee gu. Another Crest—A demi lion ramp. ar. gorged with a naval coronet gu.
6) (Walsoken, co. Norfolk). Ar. a chev. engr. sa. betw. three griffins’ heads erased az. on a chief gu. a mullet betw. two martlets or.
7) (co. Norfolk). Or, two bars gemelles gu. a chief indented ar. Crest—A demi lion ar.
8) (Court Grange, co. Devon). Gu. two bars or, a chief indented ar. Crest—A demi lion ramp. ducally gorged. Motto—Odi profanum.
9) (Scotland). Az. two bars and a chief indented or.
10) (co. Suffolk). Gu. two bars or, a chief indented ar. Crest—A lion ramp. ar.
11) Ar. on a chev. engr. sa. two martlets or, in chief three griffins' heads erased gu.
12) Ar. three Cornish choughs ppr.
13) (Charles John Hare, Esq., M.D., of Beeston, co. York, and Etchingham, co. Sussex). Motto—By watchfulness, by steadfastness. Or, eight arrows interlaced saltirewise and banded gu. on a chief sa. three mullets ar. a canton ef the last, thereon a gate of the third, the whole within a bordure erm. Crest—A demi lion ar. semee of mullets gu. supporting a flagstaff ppr. therefrom flowing towards the sinister a pennon gu. charged with a mullet ar.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P86