Hemmingway Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hemmingway Family Coat of Arms

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Hemmingway Coat of Arms Meaning

Hemmingway Name Origin & History

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Hemmingway Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hemmingway blazon are the swan, mullet and fesse. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Wade suggests that the appearance of a swan in a coat of arms is perhaps an indication of a musical person, or a “ lover of poetry and harmony”. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78 It is generally shown in a lifelike aspect and colouring, although it may be leaked and legged with other colours. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan. It is a popular charge, both on the shield itself and impress, sometimes sitting and sometimes rising as if about to take off in flight. 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hemmingway Name

Hemmingway Origin:

England

Origins of Hemmingway:

This unusual name is of early English origin and is a geographical surname acquiring from a now “lost” place in West Yorkshire, considered to have been located in the church of Halifax, judging by the appearance of early examples of the surname. An expected seven to ten thousand hamlets and settlements are known to have been disappeared in Britain since the 12th Century, due to natural conditions, such as the Black Death (plague) of 1348, in which an eighth of the population died, and to the widespread use of forced “clearing” of rural areas to create sheep meadows during the 14th and 15th Centuries. The placename Hemingway means “Hemming’s path.” It acquired from the Old Norse particular name “Hem(m)ingr”, originally a nickname from a short form of any of several compound particular names with the first component “heim”, which means home, with the Middle English word “wey”, which means way, path, an improvement of the Olde English pre 7th Century “weg”. The new surname can appear as Hemingway or Hemmingway. One of the most notable ancestors of the name was the novelist Ernest Hemingway (1899 – 1961), who wrote the novels “A Farewell To Arms,” “For Whom The Bell Tolls,” and “The Old Man And The Sea.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Hemingway, Hemmingay, Hemmingwy, Hammingway, Hyewingway. Heminghway, Heminigway, Hemminga, Hemingay.

England:

The surname Hemmingway first appeared in Yorkshire, where they held a family seat from old times. Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John de Hemyngway, dated about 1379, in the “Yorkshire Poll Tax Returns.” It was during the time of King Richard II who was known to be the “Richard of Bordeaux,” dated 1377 – 1399. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Hemmingway had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Hemmingway who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Mary and John Hemmingway settled in Maryland in 1774

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Hemmingway who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Richard Hemmingway arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Andromache” in 1850.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Hemmingway who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Jane Hernrningway at the age of 18, arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Rangitikei” in 1884.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hemmingway: United States 635; England 290; Canada 80; Australia 54; Ireland 22; New Zealand 7; Netherlands 2; South Africa 1; Brazil 1; Wales 1.

Notable People:

Anthony Hemingway is an American film and television director.

Dave Hemingway (born 1960), is a British singer.

Dree Hemingway (born 1987), is an American model and heroine.

Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961), was an American author.

George Hemingway (1872–1907), was an English cricket player.

George Hemingway (born 1947), was the chairperson of Budapest Honvéd FC.

Gerry Hemingway (born 1955), is an American jazz author and percussionist.

Gregory Hemingway (1931–2001), was an American doctor and the third son of Ernest Hemingway.

Hilary Hemingway was an American writer and niece of Ernest Hemingway

John Hemingway (born 1960), is an American writer and grandson of Ernest Hemingway.

Jack Hemingway (1923–2000), was the first son of Ernest Hemingway.

Leicester Hemingway (1915–1982), was an American author and brother of Ernest Hemingway.

Lorian Hemingway (born 1951), is an American author.

Maggie Hemingway (1946–1993), was a British novel writer.

Margaux Hemingway (1955–1996), was an American actress and granddaughter of Ernest Hemingway.

Mariel Hemingway (born 1961), is an American actress and granddaughter of Ernest Hemingway.

Mary Welsh Hemingway (1908–1986), was an American journalist and fourth wife of Ernest Hemingway.

Hemmingway Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hemmingway family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Sa. on a fesse wavy betw. three swans close ar. as many mullets gu. Crest—A swan's head and neck couped ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse