Henderson Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Henderson Family Coat of Arms

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Henderson Coat of Arms Meaning

Henderson Name Origin & History

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Henderson Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Henderson blazon are the pile, crescent and star. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, or and gules .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.7The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The pile was originally quite a simple shape, being a triangle reaching from the top of the shield down to a point near the lower centre 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pile. A clear example being that of CHANDOS awarded in 1337, Or a pile gules. There is some argument as to the origin, Wade suggests some similarity with the meaning of “pile” in construction (a foundation) and hence that the shape could be adopted by those who have demonstrated some ability in the building trade 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48. An earlier writer, Guillim, perhaps more plausibly suggested that the shape echoes those of a pennant or triangular flag 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P52 The shape is quite distinctive however and became popular, leading to many embellishments to distinguish it from its close fellows, with multiple piles meeting at various points, starting from various edges and with additional decoration, leading to potentially quite complex descriptions!

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

There were of course many widely recognised symbols that existed long before the advent of heraldry and it should be no surprise that some of these were adopted as charge in coats of arms 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301. The estoile is a typical example, reflecting the stars in the sky and represented with six wavy points, often with a little shading to give it some depth. 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile. The ancient writer Guillim assigns these symbols as the emblems of God’s goodness”. 18A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77More modern arms might use the term star explicitly to refer to the celestial object, in which case it is usually known as a blazing star 19A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Star

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Henderson Name

Henderson Origin:

Scotland, France, England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Henderson is an ancient Scottish name. This surname of Henderson is a patronymic name, meaning that the surname itself was created to denote “son of.” In this case, the surname of Henderson was given to someone who was indeed the son of Hendry, which is a Scottish personal given name. Another possible origin of this surname that is is an Anglicized form of the surname of Henryson. As surnames crossed language barriers, certain letters within that surname would change. In this case, “d” was commonly placed between the letter “n” and the letter “r.” The surname of Henryson is the patronymic form of Henry, meaning that the surname was given to people who were the son of Henry. Henry itself is a Germanic personal given name, which is made up of the components “haim” or “heim” which can be translated to mean “home” and of the element of “ric” which can be translated to mean “power.” The personal given name was initially introduced to the country of England following the Norman Invasion of 1066, and was spelled as “Henri.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Henderason, Hendry, Hennderson, Hendrie, Hendereson, Henederson, Hendersson, Hendersonn, Hendderson, Hendersoon, Hendeerson, Hendersyon

History:

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Henderson was found in the country of Scotland, which was the country from which it hailed. One person by the name of William Henrisone was mentioned in the Scottish Papers, specifically in the Public Records office in the year of 1374. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Robert II of Scotland, who was commonly referred to throughout history as “The King of the Scots.” King Robert II of Scotland ruled from the year 1371 to the year 1390. Other mentions of the surname of Henderson in the country of Scotland included the Hendersons of Fordell in Fifeshire who are believed to have descended straight from the old family Henrysons, as well as a branch of the Clan Dunn who bear the name Henderson, and a Clan Henderson that hails from Glencoe. Those who reside in the country of Scotland who bear the surname of Henderson can be found in abundance. The areas that have a large population of those who carry the surname of Henderson can be found within the counties of Lanarkshire and Midlothian, but can also be found throughout the central and eastern regions of the country of Scotland. It is important to note that the spelling of Henryson is still one of the most frequent spellings of this surname in Scotland.

England:

Those who bear the surname of Henderson can be found throughout the English countryside. The areas that have a large concentration of people who bear the surname of Henderson are the counties of Northumberland and Durham, but the areas in and around the city of London also have a large percentage of people who are known by the surname of Henderson.

United States of America:

The United States of America has a large population of people who bear the surname of Henderson. The areas where there is a large concentration of people who carry this surname of Henderson include the states of New York, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Ohio, Alabama, in California, and within the state of Texas.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Henderson: United States 234,529; England 32,104; Canada 21,191; Australia 19,344; Scotland 12,201; South Africa 11,543; New Zealand 5,292; Northern Ireland 2,289; Mexico 1,309; Brazil 1,288

Notable People:

William Randall “Bill” Henderson (1926-2016) who was a jazz singe and actor from America

David Lee Henderson (1958-2015) who had the nickname “Hendu” and played in the MLB from the year 1981 to the year 1994, and was a World Series Champion in the year 1989

Worth Dewey Henderson (1898-1996) who was a Republican from America, and who served as a Delegate to the Republican National Convention from North Carolina in the year 1932 as an alternate, in the year 1940, and in the year 1944 as an alternate

Yandell Henderson, who was a politician from America, and served as a Candidate for the U.S. Representative from Connecticut in the 3rd District in the years 1912 and 1914

William T. Henderson, who was a Republican politician from America, and served as an Alternate Delegate to the Republican National Convention from Alabama in the year 1924

William R. Henderson, who was a politician from America, who served as the Mayor of Plant City, Florida in the year 1989 to the year 1991

William H. Henderson, who was a politician from America, and served as a Candidate for the U.S. Representative from Michigan in the 9th District in the year 1916, the year 1920, and in the year 1922

Henderson Family Gift Ideas

Browse Henderson family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Randalls Park, Surrey, 1865). Motto—Sola virtus nobilitat. Gu. three piles issuing from the sinister or, a chief engr. erm. Crest—A cubit arm erect ppr. holding in the hand a star of eight points wavy, ensigned with a crescent ar.
2) (Fordell, co. Fife, bart. 1664; title extinct or dormant; heir of line, G. W. Henderson-Mercer, Esq., of Fordell). Motto—Sola virtus nobilitat. Gu. three piles issuing out of the sinister side ar. on a chief of the last a crescent az. betw. two erm. spots. (An older blazon is, per pale indented sa. and ar. on a chief of the second a crescent vert betw. two erm. spots). Crest—A cubit arm ppr. the hand holding a star or, ensigned with a crescent az. Supporters—Two mertrixes erm.
3) (Chesters, co. Haddington). As Fordell, old blazon, with a rose gu. in fess for diff.
4) (St. Laurence, Scotland, 1672). Motto—Sic cuncta caduca. Per pale indented sa. and ar. two attires of a hart counterchanged, on a chief gu. a crescent or, betw. two erm. spots. Crest—A wheel.
5) (Eildon Hall, co. Roxburgh, 1825). Motto—Virtus nobilitat. Per pale indented or and sa. three roundles in fess counterchanged. Crest—A dexter hand ppr. holding a star of six points wavy or, ensigned with a crescent az.
6) (Glasgow, 1872). Motto—Secure amitl perils. Ar. three piles issuing from the sinister sa. on a chief wavy az. an anchor betw. two crescents of the first. Crest—A lion ramp. supporting in his forepaws a trident ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pile
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P52
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
18. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77
19. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Star