Hendrick Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hendrick Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Hendrick Coat of Arms Meaning

Hendrick Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Hendrick. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

hendrick coat of arms

Hendrick Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hendrick blazon are the leopard’s face, crescent and ducal coronet. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and azure.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

Crowns are frequently observed in Heraldry 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184, but we should not make the mistake of assuming that these are always on Royal arms 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138. Many of the orders of nobility across Europe were entitled to wear crowns and coronets, Dukes, Earls, Viscounts and Barons in England each had their own distinctive headwear 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350. The ducal coronet is an example of this, being gold with a brim of strawberry leaves and a cap of crimson velvet. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Crown It may also be the case that a crown is added to an existing coat of arms as an augmentation in recognition of some service to a King 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 187.

Hendrick Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hendrick Name

Hendrick Origin:
Germany, England

Origins of Hendrick:
Listed in Europe in some four hundred surnames spelling forms since the old times, this name is a derivative of the pre 7th-century German particular name “Heim-ric,” meaning “home rule.”  Compound names of this type, were very famous in the centuries proceeding the introduction of surnames in the 12th century, and this is a good example of the genre.  Registered in such varied spellings as Henrich, Hendrich and Henrick (German), Hendry, Henry and Henryson (English and Scottish), Aimeric, Enric and Henric (French-Provencal), Hendrick, Hendrik, and Hendrickson (Flemish), Jendircke, Gendricke, Jina, and Jindrick (Czech & Slavonic), the Spanish Enriques, and the Hungarian Jendrassik, the name, as a first name, was most famous in England, no less than eight kings being so-called, but as a surname the name is most popular in Northern Europe.  In Ireland, the surname has two possible derivatives.  The first is from the 12th century Norman settlers originally called FitzHenry, the second and most likely, is as an anglicised form of the Gaelic “O’Inneirghe,” which has the unique meaning of “The descendant of the abandoned one.”  Early examples of the surname record derived from authentic charters of the period include John Fitz Henrie in the Calender of Inquisition, London, in the year 1346, Genetiv de Heinrich of Fritzlar, Germany, in 1335, and John Hendrie of Cornwall, England, in the year 1359.

Variations:
More common variations are: Henderick, Hendricke, Heindrick, Hendrieck, Hendreick, Hendricko, Hendricky, Henedrick, Heandrick, Hendrrick.

England:
The surname Hendrick first appeared in Fife, where they held a family seat from very early times, some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

Ireland:
Many of the people with surname Hendrick had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Hendrick landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th.  Some of the people with the name Hendrick who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Lidia Hendrick, who landed in Maryland in 1667.

People with the surname Hendrick who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Hance Hendrick, who landed in Virginia in 1701.  Mary Catharina Hendrick arrived in New York in 1711.  James Hendrick, who landed in Maryland in 1716.  Johan Hendrick, aged 28, arrived in Pennsylvania in 1733.  Jacob Hendrick arrived in Pennsylvania in 1733.

The following century saw more Hendrick surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Hendrick who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Eliza Hendrick, who landed in New York, NY in 1816.  John Hendrick, who arrived in Charleston, South Carolina in 1821.  Gustave Hendrick, aged 23, arrived in New York in 1849.  R Hendrick, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1850.  Francis Hendrick, who arrived in Arkansas in 1869.

Canada:
People with the surname Hendrick settled in Canada in the 19th century.  Some of the individuals with the surname Hendrick who came to Canada in the 19th century included Ms. Mary Hendrick, aged 20 who moved to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship “Bee” departing from the port of Cork, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle in June 1847.

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Hendrick who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Thomas Hendrick, a shoemaker, arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hendrick:
United States 9,917; South Africa 1,388; England 1,032; Ireland 868; Belgium 572; Canada 471; Tanzania 401; Sri Lanka 391; Malaysia 354; Ghana 320.

Notable People:
Burton J. Hendrick (1858–1936), was an American biographer.
George Hendrick (born 1949), is an American baseball player.
Harvey Hendrick (1897–1941), was an American baseball player.
Hendrick Tejonihokarawa (c. 1660 – c. 1735), was a Mohawk leader, one of the “Four Mohawk Kings.”
Hendrick Theyanoguin (1692–1755), was a Mohawk leader usually conflated with Hendrick Tejonihokarawa.
Howard Hendrick (date of birth unknown), was an American leader.
Jeff Hendrick (born 1992), is an Irish professional football player.
John Kerr Hendrick (1849–1921), was an American politician.
Kenny Hendrick (born 1969), is an American race car driver.
Mark Hendrick (born 1958), is a British politician.
Mike Hendrick (born 1948), is an English cricket player.
Paul Hendrick (born 1956), is a Canadian radio sportscaster.
Ray Hendrick (1929–1990), was an American race car driver.

Hendrick Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hendrick family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More hendrick Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(granted by Hawkins, Ulster, 1703, to John Hendrick, Sheriff of the City of Dublin, descended from a family of that name in Brabant). Az. three leopards’ faces or. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a crescent gu.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Crown
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 187