Blazons & Genealogy Notes

War cry (zawołanie): Herburt! First notation: 1353, Wesphalia origin, introduced to Poland mid XIV Cent. W polu czerwonym jabłko zielone lub złote[1] przebite trzema mieczami: w skos, w skos lewy i na opak. Klejnot: trzy pi"ra strusie.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Herburt Coat of Arms and Family Crest

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Herburt Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Herburt blazon are the sword and apple. The two main tinctures (colors) are vert and gules.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 7. Indeed, the sheer variety of different swords 8 can be bewildering and expaining the difference between a scimitar and a falchion is perhaps best left to the expert! If a charge is described just as a simple sword then it will have a straight blade and cross handle, that may be of a different colour, and, unless specified, points upwards. Wade, quoting the earlier writer Guillim, signifies the use of the sword as representing “Government and Justice”.

The apple, in conjunction with other fruit is said to signify “liberality, felicity and peace”. 9 The apple appears frequently in arms, sometimes stalked and leaved and usually gules (red). 10

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N/A commented on 05-Feb-2019
The Ruthene-Galician Herburt family descends from Herburt Pawcz brother of Fridrusz Pawcz of Horodovychi both of whom had lands and titles confirmed by Ladislaus dux Opoliensis on the November 23, 1374. Pawcz is thought to mean Pavise also spelled Pawęż in Poland. The family had previously come into the service of Daniel of Ruthene-Galicia in 1236 by following Comes Hujd from North Transylvania.

References

  • 1 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 2 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
  • 3 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 4 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 5 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
  • 6 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
  • 7 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
  • 8 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302
  • 9 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132
  • 10 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Apple