Hillyard Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hillyard Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Hillyard Coat of Arms Meaning

Hillyard Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Hillyard. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

hillyard coat of arms

Hillyard Coat of Arms Meaning

The main device (symbol) in the Hillyard blazon is the mullet. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 7A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Hillyard Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hillyard Name

Hillyard Origin:

England

Origins of Hillyard:

The name Hillyard is of Anglo-Saxon origin and derived from when the family resided in Somerset. As a local name, it acquired from the local at the hill-garth. The name could also have been a professional name for a heIIier who was a roofer, tiler or Thatcher. It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been regulated. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like Hillyard are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and combined components of other European languages, even educated people changed the spelling of their names. Authors and priests in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find many variations that relate to a single person. The developmental names of Hillyard are Hilliard, Hildyard, Hillard, Hildheard and much more.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hillyeard, Hilliyard, Hilleyard, Hillyarde, Hillard, Hilyard, Hillyrd, Hilliard, Hilleard, Hallyard.

England:

The surname Hillyard first appeared in Yorkshire where they held a family seat from very ancient times. Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Hillyard had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Hillyard landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Hillyard who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Richard Hillyard, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the year 1683.

People with the surname Hillyard who landed in the United States in the 19th century included W. Hillyard at the age of 63, who landed in America in the year 1894.

The following century saw much more Hillyard surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Hillyard who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Edward Hillyard at the age of 34, who settled in America from Liverpool, in 1900. M. Hillyard at the age of 22, who landed in America from Kilmarnock, in 1903. Louisa Hillyard at the age of 23, who moved to the United States from Weedon, in 1905. Percival Hillyard at the age of 20, who moved to America from Weeden, England, in 1907. James Wm. Hillyard at the age of 31, who shifted to the United States from Arunde, England, in the year 1908

Canada:

People with the surname Hillyard settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in 18th and 20th. Some of the people with the surname Hillyard who came to Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Samuel Hillyard U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway [Shelburne], Nova Scotia in October 1783 was passenger number 170 aboard the ship. HMS Clinton”, picked up in September 1783 at Staten Island, New York.

The following century saw much more Hillyard surnames arrive. People with the surname Hillyard who settled in Canada in the 20th century included Herbert Hillyard at the age of 31, who moved to Toronto, Canada, in 1918.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hillyard: United States 2,463; England 1,312; Canada 355; Australia 215; South Africa 91; Argentina 75; France 61; Scotland 59; New Zealand 33; Singapore 18.

Notable People:

Dave Hillyard is a trend saxophonist from San Diego, California. He has performed with many groups like The Slackers, The Rocksteady Seven, The Donkey Show, Hepcat, Stubborn All-Stars, and has a fellow with the likes of Rancid, Victor Rice, Skinnerbox NYC and Alexandra Lawerentz. He is an experienced improviser and writer/arranger with more than thirty album credits to his name.

George Whiteside Hillyard (February 1864 –March 1943) was a male tennis player from the United Kingdom. Under his administration as secretary of the All England Club from 1907 to 1925, the Wimbledon Championships moved to its current site at Parish Road.

Lyle W. Hillyard is a Utah political leader and a lawyer. A Republican, he is a member of the Utah State Senate, serving the state’s 25th senate district including the city of Logan.

Hillyard Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hillyard family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More hillyard Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Wynestead, co. York, and East Horseley, co. Surrey; an ancient and eminent family, co. York). (Patrington, co. York, bart., extinct 1814; Robert Hildyard, Esq., of Patrington, was created a bart. 1660, he was youngest son of Sir Christopher Hildyard, Knt., of Wynestead). Az. three mullets or, (and sometimes ar.) a chev. betw. three mullets ar. Crest—Originally, a reindeer ppr.; subsequently, a cock sa. beaked, legged, and wattled gu. The latter Crest was granted to this family for the valour shown by members of it at the battle of Towton, between the Houses of York and Lancaster, when Sir Robert Hildyard was slain, commanding under the banner of Lancaster.
2) (Flintham, co. Notts; exemplified to Thomas Blackborne Thoroton-Hildyard, Esq., of Flintham, J.P. and D.L., High Sheriff of Notts in 1862). Az. a chev. betw. three mullets or. Crest—A game-cock beaked, legged, and wattled gu.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
7. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105