Hinshaw Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hinshaw Family Coat of Arms

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Hinshaw Coat of Arms Meaning

Hinshaw Name Origin & History

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Hinshaw Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Hinshaw blazon are the lion rampant, border engrailed, fox and olive branch. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, gules and sable .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

The border, (sometimes bordure) is a band running around the edge of the shield, following the edge contours and being differently coloured, possibly holding a series of small charges placed on top of it 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bordure. To distinguish it from similar arms, heraldic artists developed a series of decorative edges (obviously these are applied only to the inner edge). A common form of this patterning, engrailed is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

The fox occurs frequently in arms, possibly a reference to the enjoyment of the hunt. It certainly holds no negative connotations but should be seen as a creature of great “wit and facility of device” (“as cunning as a fox”). 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P62 It can appear at first glance quite similar to the wolf but should be smaller, with a bushier tail, kept low to the ground. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fox

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hinshaw Name

The name Hinshaw is part of the old legacy of the Anglo-Saxon clans of Britain.  It is a product of when the family lived in settlement of Henshaw in Northumberland, or in settlement of Henshaw in Prestbury, which is in the county of Cheshire.  The surname Hinshaw belongs to the large category of Anglo-Saxon habitation names, which acquired from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.  The first dictionaries that appeared in the last few hundred years did much to standardise the English language. Before that time, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. The language was changing, incorporating pieces of other languages, and the spelling of names changed with it.  Hinshaw has spelt many different ways, including Henshaw, Henshall, Henshawe and others. More common variations are: Heinshaw, Hineshaw, Henshaw, Hanshaw, Hinshow, Hunshaw, Hanishaw, Hen-Shaw, Hanashaw.

The surname Hinshaw first found in Cheshire where they held a family seat from very early times, some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

Some of the people with the surname Hinshaw who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Ann Hinshaw, who landed in Virginia in the year 1642.  Mary Hinshaw, who arrived in Virginia in the year 1642.  Tho Hinshaw, who landed in Virginia in the year 1646.

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Browse Hinshaw family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Scotland, 1871). Motto— Vigilantia. Ar. a lion ramp. sa. within a bordure engr. per pale of the second and gu. Crest—A fox's head holding in the mouth an olive branch ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bordure
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P62
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fox