Howard Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Howard Family Coat of Arms

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Howard Coat of Arms Meaning

Howard Name Origin & History

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Howard Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Howard blazon are the cross crosslet fitchee and bend. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and argent.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, having an additional cross bar on each arm. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103 The final addition fitchee simply means pointed, and indicates that the lower end is pointed, as if it is to be struck into the ground. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Howard Name

Howard Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Howard may possibly derive from the Pre 7th Century Germanic personal given name of “Hughard.” This personal given name itself, which comes from the components “hug” which can be translated to mean “heart” or “spirit,” and the element of “hard” which can be translated to mean “hardy” or “brave.” The Norman-French personal given names of “Huard” and “Heward” derived from the Germanic given name, and were introduced to the country of England following the Conquest of 1066. Another possible origin from which the surname of Howard derived is from the Anglo-Scandinavian personal given name of “Haward.” This personal given name is composed of the components “ha” which can be translated to mean “high” and the component of “varthr,” which can be translated to mean “a guardian” or “a protector.” This surname was originally used as a personal given first name, but over time was adapted to be used as a surname as well. This surname of Howard has many possible spellings, and many coats of arms attached to the name.

Variations:

More common variations are: Howhard, Howardh, Howarde, Howardy, Howardd, Howared, Howarrd, Howeard, Howarad, Howaard

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Howard comes from the country of England. One person, who was named as Robert Howarde, was named in the church register rolls of Ely Abbey, which is located in Cambridgeshire, England in the year of 1221. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Henry III of England. King Henry III of England was also referred to as “Henry of Winchester” and ruled from the year 1216 to the year 1272. Other mentions of the surname of Howard in the country of England include Sir Howard, who died in the year 1308, but who the Earl Marshall, the Duke of Norfolk, has descended from. Those who bear the surname of Howard can be found in the counties of Yorkshire and Cheshire. The areas in and around the city of London are also densely populated with those who carry the surname of Howard.

Scotland:

Within the country of Scotland has a large population of people who are known by the surname of Howard. The area of the country of Scotland where many who bear this surname of Howard can be found is within the southern end of the country.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th Century, the United States of America became a haven for people who were looking to move out of their home country. Many European citizens were dissatisfied with the state of their government, and living conditions in the country of their birth. This large movement of people to the United States was regarded as the beginning of the European Migration, which in some texts is referred to as the Great Migration. Among these disgruntled settlers were people who bore the surname of Howard. The first people who carried the surname of Howard to the United States of America were both John Howard and Judeth Howard, who settled in the state of Virginia in the year of 1622. In the year 1635, both William Howard and Samuel Howard arrived in the United States. Those who bear the surname of Howard can be found in large concentrations in the states of Alabama, Texas, Georgia, California, Kentucky, Ohio, Missouri, Illinois, and Massachusetts.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Howard: United States 282,280; England 43,714; Australia 18,802; Canada 11,717; South Africa 11,050; Liberia 9,410; Nigeria 6,266; Ghana 4,473; Uganda 2,801; Ireland 2,304

Notable People:

Kenneth Joseph “Ken” Howard Jr. (1944-2016) who was an actor from America, and was most notably recognized for his role of Thomas Jefferson in 1776, and his portrayal of the basketball coach and former player from the Chicago Bulls, Ken Reeves, in the TV show The White Shadow

Mr. William Howard (died in 1915) who was a Third Class passenger from St. Louis Missouri, who was aboard the RMS Lusitania at the time of the sinking, and did not survive the sinking of the vessel

Brigadier-General Edwin Britain Howard (1901-1993) who was a Commanding Officer of the 23rd Infantry Regiment from the year 1948 to the year 1949

Brigadier-General Clinton Wilbur Howard (1890-1949) who was a Commanding General Officer of the Sacramento Air Service Command from the year 1943 to the year 1946

Richard Howard (born in 1929) who was a poet, critic, teacher, essayist, and translator from America, who was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in they year 1970

Sidney Coe Howard (1891-1939) who was a screenwriter and playwright from America, who was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in the year 1925, and was also posthumously awarded an Academy Award in the year 1940 for the screenplay Gone With The Wind

Howard Family Gift Ideas

Browse Howard family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Norfolk; Sir William Howard, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, temp. Edward I., the immediate founder of the noble house of Howard, was son of Jobn Howard, and grandson of Robert Howard, or Herward “filius Hawardi," temp. King John). (Lord Howard; Sir Robert Howard, fourth in descent from Sir William Howard, the Chief Justice, was summoned to Parliament 1476. He m. Lady Margaret Mowbray, dau. of Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, and was ancestor of the illustrious house of Howard, Dukes of Norfolk; the Barony is in abeyance betw. the Lords Stourton and Petre since 1777). Gu. a bend betw. six crosses crosslet fitchée ar.
2) (Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal of England). Motto—Sola virtus invicta. Thomas, Earl of Surrey (afterwards Duke of Norfolk), who achieved the victory of Flodden over James IV. of Scotland, had a special grant from Henry VIII. of an honourable augmentation of his arms to him and the heirs male of his body, viz., “On the bend of the original Howard coat, in an escutcheon or, a demi lion ramp. pierced through the mouth with an arrow, within a double tressure flory counterflory gu,’’ being the tressure of the Royal Arms of the Scottish monarch. Quarterly, 1st, gu. on a bend betw. six cross crosslets fitchée ar. an escutcheon or, charged with a demi lion ramp. pierced through the mouth by an arrow within a double tressure flory counterflory of the first, for Howard; 2nd, gu. three lions pass. guard, in pale or, in chief a label of three points ar., for Brotherton; 3rd, chequy or and az., for Warren; 4th, gu. a lion ramp. or, for Fitzalan; behind the shield two gold batons in saltire enamelled at the ends sa. (the insigna of Earl Marshal). Crests—1st: Issuant from a ducal coronet or, a pair of wings gu. each charged with a bend betw. six cross crosslets fitchée ar.; 2nd: On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a lion statant with tail extended or, gorged with a ducal coronet ar.; 3rd: On a mount vert a horse pass, ar. holding in the mouth a slip of oak fructed ppr. Supporters—Dexter, a lion; sinister a horse, both ar. the latter holding in his mouth a slip of oak vert, fructed ppr.
3) (Earl of Suffolk and Berkshire). Mottoes—Nous maintiendrons; and, Non quo, sed quo modo. Quarterly, 1st, gu. a bend betw. six cross crosslets fitchée ar. on the bend an escutcheon or, charged with a demi lion ramp. pierced through the mouth with an arrow, within a double tressure flory counterflory gu., for Howard; 2nd, gu. three lions pass. guard. in pale or, and a label of three points ar., for Brothehton; 3rd, chequy or and az., for Warren: 4th, gu. a lion ramp. ar., for Mowbray; in the centre of the shield a crescent for diff. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a lion statant guard, tail extended or, ducally gorged ar. and charged on the body with a crescent for diff. Supporters—Two lions ar. each charged on the breast with a crescent sa.
4) (Earl of Carlisle). Quarterly of six, 1st, Howard, gu. on a bend betw. six cross crosslets fitchée ar. an escutcheon or, charged with a demi lion ramp. pierced through the mouth with an arrow, within a double tressure flory counterflory of the first, a mullet for diff.; 2nd, Brotherton, gu. three lions pass. guard. in pale or, in chief a label of three points ar.; 3rd, Warren, chequy or and az.; 4th, Mowbray, gu. a lion ramp. ar. armed and langued az.; 5th, Dacre, gu. three escallops ar.; 6th, Greystock, barry of six ar. and az. three chaplets gu. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a lion statant guard, the tail extended or, ducally gorged ar. a mullet sa. for diff. Supporters—Dexter, a lion ar. a mullet for diff.; sinister, a bull gu. armed, unguled, ducally gorged and lined or.
5) (Baron Lanerton). Same Arms, Crest, and Motto as the Earl of Carlisle's, a crescent for diff. Supporters—Dexter, a lion ar. charged on the shoulder with a mullet sa.; sinister, a bull gu. hoofed, armed, ducally gorged, and line reflexed over the back or, both charged on the body with a crescent gold.
6) (Corby Castle, co. Cumberland). Motto—Sola virtus invicta. Gu. on a bend betw. six cross crosslets fitchée ar. an escutcheon or, charged with a demi lion ramp. pierced through the mouth with an arrow within a double tressure flory counterflory of the first, quartering Brotherton, Warren, Mowbray, Dacre, and Greystoke. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a lion statant guard, tail extended or, ducally crowned ar. gorged with a label of three points of the last.
7) (Earl of Northampton; created 1604, extinct 1614). (Viscount Bindon; created 1559, extinct 1610). Gu. on a bend betw. six crosses crosslet fitchée ar. an escutcheon or, charged with a demi lion ramp. pierced through the mouth with an arrow, within a double tressure flory counterflory of the first, a crescent for diff.
8) (Earl of Nottingham; created 1596, extinct 1681). Same Arms and Crest as the Duke of Norfolk, with a mullet (or diff. Supporters—Two lions ar.
9) (Earl of Effingham). Motto—Virtus mile scuta. Gu. on a bend betw. six cross crosslets fitchée ar. an escutcheon or, charged with a demi lion ramp. pierced through the mouth with an arrow, within a double tressure flory counterflory of the first. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a lion statant guard, tail extended or, gorged with a ducal coronet ar. Supporters—Two lions ar. on the shoulder of each a mullet for diff.
10) (Dublin; confirmed by Hawkins, Ulster, 1708, to Doctor Ralph Howard, aon of John Howard, and father of Robert Howard, Bishop of Elphin, ancestor of the Earls of Wicklow). Gu. a bend betw. six crosses crosslet fitchée ar.; in 1713 the following augmentation was granted, viz.: on a canton az. a sun in splendour or. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a lion statant guard, tail extended or, ducally gorged gu. and pierced through the mouth with an arrow ppr.
11) (Earl of Wicklow). Mottoes— Inservi Deo et lætare; and, Certum pete finem. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. a bend. betw. six cross crosslets fitchée ar.; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a lion ramp. gu. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a lion statant guard, or, ducally gorged gu., holding in the mouth an arrow ppr. Supporters—Two stags ppr. ducally gorged, each charged on the shoulder with a cross crosslet fitchée ar.
12) (Bushy Park, co. Wicklow, bart.; extinct 1873). Motto—Inservi Deo et laetare. Gu. a bend betw. six crosses crosslet fitchée ar. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a lion pass. guard. or, holding in the mouth an arrow in fesse ppr.
13) (Broughton Hall, co. Flint). Motto—Virtus sine metu. Gu. on a bend indented or, three escallops of the first betw. six cross crosslets fitchée ar. Crest—A lion’s head affrontee betw. two wings, a cross crosslet fitchee issuing from the head.
14) Gu. on a bend engr. betw. six crosses botonnee fitchee or, three crescents of the first. Crest—A lion couchant erm. holding in the dexter paw a cross botonnee fitchee of the second.
15) (Howard-Vyse). (The Manor Cottage, Old Windsor). Motto—Virtus mille scuta. (Stoke Place, co. Bucks, and Boughton, co. Northampton). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Vyse, ar. a buck’s head cabossed sa. betw. the attires a cross of the last; 2nd and 3rd, Howard, gu. on a bend betw. six crosses crosslet fitchée ar. an escutcheon or, charged with a demi lion pierced through the mouth with an arrow, within a double tressure flory counterflory gu. a mullet sa. charged with a crescent or, for diff. Crest—Howard: On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a lion statant guard, the tail extended or, ducally crowned, and charged on the neck with a label of three points ar. a mullet sa. charged with a crescent or, for diff.
16) (co. Lancaster). Gu. on a bend betw. six crosses crosslet ar. an annulet for diff. Crest—A lion ramp. ar. holding betw. the paws a cross crosslet fitchée of the first.
17) (London). Gu. on a bend ar. betw. six crosses crosslet fitchée or, a mullet betw. two cinquefoils of the first. Crest—A demi wolf ppr. holding betw. the paws a cross crosslet fitchée or, collared gu. thereon a mullet betw. two cinquefoils gold.
18) (Hackney, co. Middlesex). Gu. a bend or, betw. six crosses flory fitchée ar. on a canton of the second a hind’s head erased ppr. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a demi hind saliant ppr. charged on the shoulder with a cross flory fitchée ar.
19) (Beinnington Hall, co. Chester). Motto—Per fidem omnia. (Brinnington, co. Chester; Edward Carrington Howard, Esq., of that place, J.P., where his ancestors have been settled for more than a century). Motto—Per fidem omnia. Barry of six or and az. on a bend erm. betw. two crosses botony gu. a shuttle ppr. Crest—In front of a cross botony fitchée gu. a lion couchant or, charged on the shoulder with an estoile gu.
20) Gu. a bend vairé or and az. betw. six crosses crosslet fitchée of the second. Crest—Two wings expanded gu. each charged with a bend vairé or and az. betw. six crosses crosslet of the last.
21) Gu. a bend betw. six crosses crosslet fitchée ar. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, two wings expanded gu. each charged with a bend betw. six crosses crosslet, as in the arms.
22) Gu. a bend betw. six crosses crosslet fitchée ar. Crest—A lion’s head erased collared.
23) Same Arms. Crest On a chapeau gu. turned up. erm. two wings endorsed of the first, each charged with a bend betw. six crosses crosslet, as in the arms.
24) Per chev. az. and gu. a lion saliant erm. (another, the lion crowned).
25) Quarterly, ar. and az. a saltire counterchanged (another, the saltire engr.).
26) Ar. a bull’s head gu. betw. three mullets sa.
27) (Toronto, Canada; James Scott Howard, Esq., of Toronto, J.P. and Treasurer of the united counties of York and Peel, in Upper Canada, son of the late John Howard, by Mary, his wife, dau. of James Scott, of Bandon, descends from a Huguenot family, named Ouward, which fled from France at the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, and became established at Innishannon, co. Cork, where they acquired property, and founded a flourishing and extensive business in silk and cotton manufactures. In more propitious times, Nicholas Howard, the grandfather of the present representative, returned to France, and succeeded in recovering a portion of his ancestral property). Motto—Pro fide. Az. a fesse ar. betw. in chief a passion cross of the last betw. two fleurs-de-lis or, and in base a catharine wheel of the second. Crest—A catharine wheel ar. betw. on the dexter side, a branch of palm, and on the sinister a branch of cypress ppr.
28) (descended from John Howard, Esq., of Kingsdon, co. Somerset, 1623, a branch of the noble family of Howard, represented by the Rev. Thomas Henry Howard, M.A., Vicar of Warmley, co. Somerset,). Motto—Sola virtus invicta. Gu. a bend betw. six crosses crosslet, fitchee ar. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a lion statant guard, tail extended or, ducally gorged ar.
29) (William Howard, Esq., of St. Mary, Colchester, co Essex). Motto—Nous maintiendrons. Per pale gu. and az. on a bend nebuly or, betw. four cross crosslets fitchee of the last a crescent betw. two lions' heads erased of the second. Crest—A lion pass. az. charged on the body with two trefoils, holding in the dexter paw a cross crosslet fitchee all or.
30) (James Howard, Esq., of Clapbam Park, co. Bedford, High Sheriff of that county, and its M.P.). Motto—Progress with prudence. Gu. on a chev. betw. two garbs in chief and a tower in base or, an eagle displ. sa. Crest—In front of an eagle displ. sa. holding in the beak an ear of wheat slipped or, a tower of the last.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49