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Origin, Meaning, Family History and Ivory Coat of Arms and Family Crest

This interesting and long-established surname has two distinct possible origins, each with its history and origin.  Firstly, Ivory may be of Norman-French origin, and a locational name from Ivry-la-Bataille in Eure, Normandy, so called from Gallo-Roman personal name "Eburius", a derivative of "ebur", ivory, and the local suffix "-acum", village, settlement.  The family "de Ivery" considered to be descended from Rodolph, half-brother to Richard the First, Duke of Normandy, who awarded the Palace of Ivery for killing a monstrous boar while hunting with the Duke. More common variations are: Ivorry, Ivorey, Ivoroy, Ivorya, Ivor, Ivry, Ivery, Avory, Ivoriya, Ivorye.

The surname Ivory first found in Oxfordshire Where they held a family seat from very early times and given lands by Duke William of Normandy, their true Lord, for their special assistance a the Battle of Hastings in 1066 AD.

Some of the people with the name Ivory who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Ivory, who arrived in Lynn, Massachusetts in 1652.  Some of the people with the surname Ivory who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Edward Ivory, who landed in America in 1805.  Some of the people with the surname Ivory who arrived in the Canada in the 19th century included John Ivory, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1820.

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Argent a bend vert between three mullets gules. Crest— A lion sejant affronte gules holding in the dexter paw a sword argent pommel and hilt or, and in the sinister a fleur-de-lis gold.

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References

  • 1 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 2 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
  • 3 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 4 The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
  • 5 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
  • 6 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 7 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 8 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 9 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
  • 10 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
  • 11 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
  • 12 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
  • 13 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
  • 14 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
  • 15 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
  • 16 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
  • 17 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
  • 18 A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
  • 19 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60