Justice Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Justice Family Coat of Arms

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Justice Coat of Arms Meaning

Justice Name Origin & History

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Justice Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Justice blazon are the sword, crescent, balance and leopard’s face. The two main tinctures (colors) are vert and gules.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. Indeed, the sheer variety of different swords 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302 can be bewildering and expaining the difference between a scimitar and a falchion is perhaps best left to the expert! If a charge is described just as a simple sword then it will have a straight blade and cross handle, that may be of a different colour, and, unless specified, points upwards. Wade, quoting the earlier writer Guillim, signifies the use of the sword as representing “Government and Justice”.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. The balance or scales is a typical example of this. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Justice Name

Justice Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Justice:

The surname of Justice can be attributed to two possible origins. The first possible origin for the surname of Justice is that it is an occupational surname. This means that the original bearer of the surname of Justice most likely was a justice of the peace, or some form of judicial officer, meaning that he actually carried out this job. Occupational surnames were not originally hereditary surnames. They only became hereditary if the son followed in his father’s footsteps for a career; then the surname became hereditary and was used by the children and spouse of the son. The second possible origin of the surname of Justice is that it was used as a nickname for someone who was fair-minded, or someone who played the part of a judge in the theatre. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. This surname of Justice derives from the Old French, Pre 7th Century word of “justice” which itself comes from the Old Latin word “Justus,” which can be translated to mean “honorable,” or “upright.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Justicee, Jusstice, Jeustice, Juestice, Juustuce, Justce, Justace, Jestice, Justuce, Jastice

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Justice can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of William La Justis, who was named in the document known as the Ancient Deeds of Suffolk in the year of 1200. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King John of England, who was known as one “Lackland.” King John of England ruled from the year 1199 to the year 1216. Other mentions of the surname of Justice in the country of England include one Howell Justice, who was the son of Robert Justice, and who was baptized in the year of 1596 at St. Bride, which is located on Fleet Street. Another mention of the surname of Justice is when one Jeremy Justice was married to one Ann Staple at St. Dunstan’s, which is located in Stepney, London, in the year of 1595. Those who are known to carry the surname of Justice within the country of England can be found in high concentrations in the areas of Lancashire, Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire, Kent, Surry, Hampshire, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, and the areas in and around the city of London.

Scotland:

In the country of Scotland, there is a sizable population of people who are known by the surname of Justice. The areas that have the largest concentration of those with the surname of Justice can be found in Lanarkshire, Fife, Angus, Midlothian, Argyll and in Perthshire.

United States of America:

Within the United States, those who bear the surname of Justice can be found in North Carolina, Ohio, New Jersey, Kentucky, Virginia, Georgia, Indiana, Texas, Pennsylvania, and Maryland.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Justice: United States 35,039; Nigeria 30,567; 16,375; South Africa 2,904; England 1,855; Uganda 1,494; Cameroon 1,388; Tanzania 1,289; Pakistan 1,132 Lesotho 1,038

Notable People:

Victoria Justice who was born in the year 1993 and who is a dance, singer, songwriter, and actress from America

David Christopher Justice who was born in the year 1966 in America and who is a former outfielder and designated hitter in Major League Baseball

Donald Justice (1925-2004) who was a poet and writing teacher from America who was awarded a Pulitzer prize in the year 1980 for his poetry

Edward J. Justice (1925-2004) who was a Democratic politician from America who served as a member of the North Carolina State House of representatives for the year 1899 and the year 1970 and the year 1913 to the year 1914 he was also the speaker of the house for the North Carolina State house of Representatives for the year 1907

E.J. Justice who was a democratic politician from America who also represented North Carolina as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in the year 1912

E. E. Justice who was a Democratic Politician from America who served as one of Texas’s alternative delegates to the Democratic National Convention in the year 1940

Justice Family Gift Ideas

Browse Justice family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (East Crichton, co. Edinburgh). Az. a sword in pale ppr. supporting a pair of balances or, within a bordure of the last. Crest—A sword ppr. Motto—Non sine causa.
2) (Coventry; granted by Camden, Clarenceux), Sa. a fess erm. betw. three crescents or. Crest—On a garb or, a cock gu.
3) (Knighton, co. Stafford). Vert (another, az.) a bend erm. cotised or, betw. two falcons rising of the third.
4) Gu. a chev. betw. three leopards’ faces or. Crest—A cat sejant ramp. ppr.
5) Gu. on a cross couped ar. five mullets sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100