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Kilby Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Kilby Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Kilby Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Kilby. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Kilby Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Kilby blazon are the mullet, boar and torteaux. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and azure.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 7A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and torteau is a roundle gules, or red. (We must be careful however not to confuse this with the word in French heraldry, in which torteau means roundle and must have the colour specified.) Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Kilby Name

Kilby Origin:

England

Origin of Kilby:

The Kilby surname is listed with different spellings forms such as Kilby, Kileby, Kilsby, and Killerby and is an English name. It is regional and related to the hamlet of Kilby in Leicestershire or a similar name with hamlets of Killerby in the divisions of Durham and North Yorkshire. Kilby was first listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Cilebi” and after sometime it was listed with the form “Kildeby” in 1219. At the same time, the different Killerby’s all appear in the Domesday Book as Culuerbi or Chilurobi expressing the weakness of Norman ministers to recognize and convert the solid local accents of that period perfectly. The explanation of the hamlet name can be ‘The infant’s agreement’ associated before the 7th century from the Ancient English and Norse word “Cilda-bi.” It did not mean a baby or children but was a particular name of affection provided either to a first infant, or more similar as lands and partnerships combined, to the firstborn infant of a regional administrator. Henry Kilby, was an earlier migrator to the English provinces of New World, departing from London on the ship “George” in 1635, sailing for Virginia.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Kilbey, Killby, Kilboy, Kilbay, Kilb, Killbey, Killeby, Killaby, Killiby, Keilbey.

England:

The name Kilby was first found in Northumberland where they held a family seat from very ancient times; some say well before the Norman Invasion and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of William de Kilebi, which was dated about 1202, in the Assize Rolls of Northamptonshire. It was during the time of King John of England, 1199 – 1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Kilby settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Kilby who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Peter Kilby settled in Virginia in 1634. Henry Kilby settled in Virginia in 1635. Henry Kilby at the age of 27, arrived in Virginia in 1635.

Some of the people with the name Kilby who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Christopher Kilby at the age of 50, and Felix Kilby at the age of 18 both arrived in New York in the same year in 1812. William Kilby, who arrived in New York in 1829.

Some of the people with the name Kilby who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Richard F. Kilby at the age of 21, arrived in New York City, New York in 1919 aboard the ship “Lake Weir” from Sanga La Grande, Cuba. Oscar Kilby at the age of 22, originally from Princeton, N.J., arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship “La Lorraine” from Le Havre, France. Herbert F.S Kilby at the age of 28, originally from Fernborough, England, arrived in New York in 1920 aboard the ship “Lapland” from Antwerp, Belgium. Noel H. Kilby at the age of 34, originally from London, England, arrived in New York 1920 aboard the ship “Kaiserin Augusta Victoria” from Liverpool, England.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Kilby who settled in Canada in the 18th century included John Kilby, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Kilby who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included John C. W. Kilby at the age of 22, who was a laborer and John R. Kilby at the age of 15 both people arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Hindostan” in the same year in 1875.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Kilby: United States 4,992; England 2,538; Wales 214; Colombia 87; France 73; Spain 11; Australia 953; Scotland 98; Canada 632; New Zealand 69.

Notable People:

Arthur Forbes Gordon Kilby was an English participant of the Victoria Cross.

Barry Kilby was a Chairman of Burnley Football Club in the UK

Jack St. Clair Kilby was an American electrical engineer, creator of the circuit, and Nobel winner.

Richard Kilby was an English professor.

Thomas Erby Kilby was an administrator of Alabama in 1919-23.

Kilby Family Gift Ideas

Browse Kilby family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (John Kilby, chosen Alderman of York, 1803). Ar. three boars az. in chief as many annulets of the last.
2) Ar. three torteaux in fesse betw. two barrulets az. Crest—A hand issuing from a cloud in fesse, pointing to a crosier in pale all ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
7. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
19. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
20. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
21. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
22. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
23. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
24. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67
25. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
26. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle