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Kimber Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Kimber Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Kimber Family Coat of Arms

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Kimber Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Kimber blazon are the mullet, cornish chough and bull. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and argent.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 7A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. The Cornish Chough is a member of the crow family and is often depicted as black with red or orange beak and legs. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cornish chough Wade gives it the role of “king of crows” and believes that its use denotes a “man of stratagems”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P82

Bulls, and their close relations, cows, calves, oxen and the buffalo are relatively recent additions to the art of heraldry (and it is not always possible to distinguish between them in their renderings). 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bull They can be found in a variety of poses and may have horns, hooves and collared in a different colour. The writer Guillim noted that the prescence of a bull could signify ”valour and magnanimity”. 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P117

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Kimber Name

Kimber Origin:

England

Origins of Kimber:

This interesting and unique surname is Anglo-Saxon and has two possible origins. The surname may acquire from the Olde English pre 7th Century word “cemban,” which means to comb, and would have been a professional name for a breaker of wood or flax. Professional surnames frequently mentioned the real profession of the name heritor, and after that became ancestry. The other possible development is from a metronymic, made from the Olde English appropriate female name “Cyneburh,” combination of the components “cyne,” which means grand or royal, and “burh,” which means fort, castle. This name was inherented by a daughter of the 7th Century King Penda of Mercia, who, instead of following her father’s obstruction to Christianity, changed and appeared as a ministry, and then gave services as its head. She was respected as a religious girl or martyr in the Middle Ages, and children were christened after her. The surname was first listed in the first half of the 14th Century and can also appear as Kember and Kimbrough. In January 1581, Edward Kimber named in London. Isaac Kimber was a Baptist general administrator who controlled “The Morning Chronicle” (1728 – 1732), and also was written Ainsworth’s “Latin Dictionary” (1751), and the released the “Life of Oliver Cromwell” (1724).

Variations:

More common variations are: Kimbery, Kiember, Kimbero, Kimbere, Kimmber, Keimber, Kiamber, Kimberi, Kimbier, Kwimbere.

England:

The origins of the surname Kimber were found in Cornwall where people held a family seat from early times. Some say better before the success of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Roger le Kembar, dated about 1327, in the “premium Rolls of Sussex.” It was during the time of King Edward II, who was known to be the “Edward of Caernafon,” dated 1307-1327. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Kimber had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Kimber settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Kimber who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Martha Kimber at the age of 22, arrived in Virginia in 1683

Some of the people with the surname Kimber who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Henrich Kimber at the age of 20, settled in Pennsylvania in 1753. Henry and Mary Kimber, both arrived in Philadelphia in 1753. John Kimber came to Charles Town in 1764

Some of the people with the surname Kimber who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Frederick Kimber, who settled in New York in 1834. James Kimber, who landed in New York in 1834. George Kimber, who shifted in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1852. Charles Kimber, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1852. John Kimber at the age of 19, arrived in New York in 1862.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Kimber who settled in Australia in the 19th century included William Kimber at the age of 24, came to South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “Samuel Boddington.” Charles Kimber settled in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “John Woodall” in 1849. William Kimber at the age of 24, arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Samuel Boddington” in 1849. John Kimber came to Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Spartan” in 1849

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Kimber who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included John Kimber at the age of 22, who was a worked, landed in Bluff, New Zealand aboard the ship “Christian McAusland” in 1875. John Kimber settled in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Edwin Fox” in 1875

Here is the population distribution of the last name Kimber: United States 3,689; England 4,571; Australia 1,797; Canada 647; South Africa 858; Scotland 151; Wales 147; New-Zealand 341; Northern Ireland 107; Sweden 160.

Notable People:

Cecil Kimber (1888-1945) was an automobile engineer.

Glenn Kimber is an American writer and professor.

Samuel Jackson “Sam” Kimber (October 1854 – November 1925) was an American Major League baseball player.

Sir Sidney Guy Kimber (1873–1949) was a British leader, who was born in Highfield, Southampton.

Kimber Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Ar. three Cornish choughs sa. beaks and legs gu. on a chief of the second as many mullets of the first. Crest—A bull’s head affrontée ppr. Motto—Frangas non flectes.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
7. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cornish chough
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P82
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bull
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P117
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
17. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
19. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
20. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
21. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
22. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
23. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cornish chough
24. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P82
25. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bull
26. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P117