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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Sa. a saltire ar. on a chief of the second a lion pass. of the first. Crest—A crescent per crescent or and gu.
2) (Monken Hadley, co. Middlesex; granted by Cooke, Clarenceux, 3 April, 1574). Az. a pelican betw. three fleurs-de lis or. Crest—A demi goat ermines, horned and hoofed gold, a collar and chain about his neck sa.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Kimpton Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Kimpton Origin:

England

Origins of Kimpton:

This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a geographical name from either of two places thus called. Kimpton in Hampshire noted as "Chementune" in the Domesday Book of 1086, and as "Keminton" in the 1167 Pipe Rolls, and the place in Hertfordshire noted as "Kamintone" in the Domesday Book and as "Cuminton" in the 1198 Feet of Fines. Both place names share the similar meaning and origin, which is from the Olde English pre 7th Century specific name "Cyma" (a short form of "Cynemaer", combination of the components "cyne", which means royal, with "maer", fame), and "tun", which means enclosure, settlement. So, "Cyma's enclosure." During the Middle Ages when migration for the purpose of job-seeking was becoming more common, people often took their old hamlet name as a source of recognition, thus resulting in a wide spreading of the name. Recordings of the surname from Hertfordshire Parish Records contain the christening of Cutbertus, son of Wilhelmi Kimpton, in September 1547, at Stevenage; the wedding of William Kimpton and Elizabeth Sleape in November 1559, at Hertingfordbury; and the wedding of Edmund Kimpton and Elizabeth Whitt, in October 1566, at All Saints and Saint John, Hertford.

Variations:

More common variations are: Kimption, Kimpeton, Kmpton, Kempton, Kampton, Kompton, Kympton, Kimpdon, Kimptan, Kumpton

England:

The surname Kimpton first appeared in Kempston, churches in Bedfordshire and Norfolk. The first record of the family was Peter de Kemeston who was noted in the Pipe Rolls of Bedfordshire in 1190. Years later the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 in Berkshire noted as Simon de Kempston, and after that again, Symond Kempston noted in the year 1426 in the Paston Letters and Papers of the Fifteenth Century. Richard Kemson recorded in the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Thomas de Kymynton, dated about 1327, in the "Exchequer Lay Subsidy for Somerset." It was during the time of King Edward III who was known to be the “The Father of the Navy," dated 1327 - 1377. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Kimpton had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Kimpton who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Frank Egerton Kimpton, who shifted to the United States from London, in 1903. Albert Kolempfner Kimpton, who moved to the United States from Manchester, in 1905. Annie Kimpton, who moved to the United States from Cambridge, England, in the year 1909. Robert Mark Kimpton, who moved to the United States from Slough, England, in the year 1909. Grace Kimpton, who landed in America from London, England, in the year 1911.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Kimpton who landed in Australia in the 19th century included George Kimpton arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Madawaska" in the year 1849. James Kimpton arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Stebonheath" in the year 1849. Ann Kimpton arrived in South Australia in the year 1854 aboard the ship "Star Queen." Samuel Kimpton arrived in South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship "Blundell."

Here is the population distribution of the last name Kimpton: England 1,032; Australia 945; United States 643; Canada 261; New Zealand 161; Wales 135; Ireland 22; Singapore 18; Zimbabwe 11; Spain 10.

Notable People:

Lawrence Alpheus Kimpton (1910–1973) was an American scholar and educator, and a director of the University of Chicago. He got a B.A. at Stanford and a Ph.D. in philosophy at Cornell University, and he considered Deep Springs College before joining Chicago as a professor of philosophy in 1943.

Nick Kimpton (born 1983), is an Australian baseball player.

Roger Kimpton (1916–1999), was an Australian cricket player.

Sid Kimpton (1887–1968), was an English football player and manager.

Kimpton Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Kimpton blazon are the lion passant, pelican, fleur-de-lis and goat. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and sable .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 9 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 10. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 11

The pelican is often associated with parenthood and “devoted and self sacrificing charity”. 12 It is almost always shown with its young in their nest (in its piety) or pricking its breast in readiness to feed its young with its own blood (vulning herself. 13

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 14. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”15 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 16

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References

  • 1 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
  • 2 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 3 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 4 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
  • 5 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 6 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 7 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 8 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 9 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
  • 10 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
  • 11 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61
  • 12 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P77-78
  • 13 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pelican
  • 14 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
  • 15 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
  • 16 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489