Kingston Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Kingston Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Kingston. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Kingston Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Kingston blazon are the lion passant, sword, leopard’s face and bend wavy. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, sable and or .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. Indeed, the sheer variety of different swords 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302 can be bewildering and expaining the difference between a scimitar and a falchion is perhaps best left to the expert! If a charge is described just as a simple sword then it will have a straight blade and cross handle, that may be of a different colour, and, unless specified, points upwards. Wade, quoting the earlier writer Guillim, signifies the use of the sword as representing “Government and Justice”.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Kingston Name

1831. Two more would also arrive in Nova Scotia, Elizabeth Kingston in 1832, and Paul Kingston in 1833.

Australia:

Some of the Kingston people who ultimately settled in Australia included Benjamin Kingston in 1823 in Van Diemen’s Land. Thomas Kingston in 1826 in New South Wales, and George Strickland Kingston 1836 in Adelaide.

New-Zealand:

The settlement of the Kingston family would also reach as far as places in New-Zealand. J.L Kingston who was a surgeon settled in Auckland in 1865, and Paul Kingston in 1875.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Kingston: United States 8,516; England 6,415; Nigeria 3,821; Australia 3,511; Ireland 1,529; Canada 2,320; South Africa 968; Ghana 879; India 609; Papua New Guinea 1,494.

Notable People:

Kingston is generally referred to as the capital of Jamaica.

Kenny Kingston (1927-2014), in the American psychic medium, he executed readings about John Wayne and Harry. S. Truman, Lucille Ball and many others.

Stephen Kingston was an American politician, and a member of U.S council in Havana.

Richard Kingston was also a politician in American, and a member of Wisconsin State Senate.

John Heddens Kingston, (b. 1955), was an important person in American politics. He was a member of Georgia State House Representative. Additionally, he was U.S representative for Georgia 1st District in the year 1993.

Harry T. Kingston, a prime member of Pennsylvania State House Representatives from Philadelphia. However, he resigned from his post in the year 1903.

Kingston Family Gift Ideas

Browse Kingston family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Bedford). Sa. a lion ramp. or.
2) (co. Berwick). (Wendover, co. Buckingham). Same Arms, the lion’s tail double queued.
3) (co. Derby). Az. three swords fessways in pale ar.
4) (cos. Gloucester and Leicester). Az. a cross or, betw. four leopards’ faces ar.
5) (Grimslye and Bassingham, co. Lincoln). Same Arms. Crest—A goat saliant ar. against a tree vert.
6) (London). Sa. guttée d'eau a lion ramp. or. Crest—Out of a mural coronet counter-componée or and sa. a unicorn’s head az. crined ar. horn gobonée of the second and first.
7) (co. York). Ar. a bend wavy cotised gu.
8) (temp. Richard II.). Ar. a steel cap ppr. in the front thereof a feather gu.
9) Az. three swords in pale ar. hilted or, two erect upwards and one betw. downwards.
10) Sa. three leopards' faccs ducally crowned ar.
11) Chequy or and gu. a bend erm.
12) Ar. a bend wavy gu. betw. two bendlets of the last.
13) Ar. guttée de sang, on a chief az. three crowns or.
14) Gu. on a chev. or, betw. three cinquefoils of the second five mullets az.
15) (temp. George III.). Per pale az. and gu. guttée d’eau a lion ramp. double queued erminois.
16) (Mosstown, co. Longford; granted to Alexander Kingston, Esq., of that place, one of the Governors of the co. Longford). Motto—Dei gratia. Per pale ar. and gu. a chev. counterchanged betw. a thistle slipped in dexter chief ppr. and a trefoil in sinister chief or, in dexter base a trefoil slipped vert, and in sinister a thistle slipped of the fourth. Crest—A swan holding in its beak a thistle slipped ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65