Blazons & Genealogy Notes

War cry (zawołanie): Korwin! First notation: 1224 W polu czerwonym na pniu naturalnym, ociętym, ułożonym w pas, o dw"ch sękach u g"ry i dw"ch u dołu stoi kruk czarny w lewo (lub prawo) z pierścieniem złotym, diamentem ku dołowi w dziobie. W klejnocie trzy pi"ra strusie.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Korwin Coat of Arms and Family Crest

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Korwin Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Korwin blazon are the bird bolt, tree trunk and ring. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and sable.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 7. Indeed, the sheer variety of different swords 8 can be bewildering and expaining the difference between a scimitar and a falchion is perhaps best left to the expert! Even so, the bird bolt is an important symbol in heraldry, it is a special form of arrow head. 9

Amongst the natural objects depicted on a coat of arms, trees feature frequently, either in whole or as individual branches and leaves. 10. Sometimes the species or the part of tree was chosen as an allusion to the name of the bearer, as in Argent three tree stumps (also known as stocks) sable” for Blackstock 11 Trees of course had long been venerated and its use in a coat of arms may have represented some association with the god Thor 12

The most common form of household jewelery in heraldry is the ring or gem ring, shown with a jewel which may have a different colour. 13 Wade, incorrectly terms the annulet a finger ring, but assigns the meaning of “fidelity” to it – more properly this meaning belongs to the gem ring. 14

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References

  • 1 The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
  • 2 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
  • 3 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 4 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 5 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 6 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 7 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
  • 8 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302
  • 9 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bird bolt
  • 10 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407
  • 11 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P309
  • 12 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P112
  • 13 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:ring
  • 14 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P94