Learmonth Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Learmonth Family Coat of Arms

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Learmonth Coat of Arms Meaning

Learmonth Name Origin & History

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Learmonth Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Learmonth blazon are the rose, mascle, chevron and tressure. The four main tinctures (colors) are vert, or, sable and azure.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

The mascle is a close relative of the lozenge or diamond shape, but with the centre cut away revealing the background underneath. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle. Guillim, writing in the 17th century reckoned the mascle to represent the mesh of a net, being the biblical symbol for “persuasion, whereby men are induced to virtue and verity”. 15A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 16A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.17The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Learmonth Name

Learmonth Origin:

Scotland

Origins of Learmonth:

This interesting surname is of Scottish origin and is habitational from a place called Learmonth in the old division of Berwickshire, of uncertain etymology. The placename may acquire from the Germanic “lar,” clearing, and the Gaelic “monadh,” which means mountain, moor, but since the place is in the Lowlands, an English (or Scandinavian) etymology should perhaps be sought. Andrea de Lermwth, who was noted in Edinburgh in 1413, and found again in 1426 as Lermonth, and Alexander Leyremonthe or Leremonthe were clerk of works of the town and castle of Berwick in 1434. The new surname can found noted as Learmond, Learmonth, Learmont, and Leirmonth, and in the the early 17th Century a Scot by the name of George Learmont gave services as a soldier in the Polish army, but was caught by the Russians in 1613 and settled in Russia. His ancestors include the novel writer and poet Mikhail Yurievich Lermontov (1814 – 1841). Listed in the Scottish Church Records are the wedding of John Learmond and Margarett Lockhart in January 1713 at Edinburgh Parish, Edinburgh, Midlothian, and the christening of Patrick, son of Robert Learmond and Janet Taitt, in October 1715, also at Edinburgh, Midlothian.

Variations:

More common variations are: Learamonth, Learmounth, Larmonth, Lermonth, Learmenth, Laermonth, Leemonth

Scotland:

The surname Learmonth first appeared in Berwickshire where they held a family seat from old times. Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of William de Leirmontht, dated about 1408, in the “juror on an inquisition at Swinton,” Scotland. It was during the time of King James I, dated 1406 – 1437.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Learmonth had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Learmonth who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included B Learrnonth, aged 21, landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1775. Euphemia Learrnonth arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1775.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Learmonth who landed in Australia in the 19th century included William Learmonth, aged 39, arrived in South Australia in 1857 aboard the ship “Monsoon.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Learmonth: Australia 730; England 597; Scotland 453; Canada 297; South Africa 292; United States 215; New Zealand 133; Wales 45; Portugal 28; Zimbabwe 11.

Notable People:

Ian Learmonth was a British police officer.

James Rögnvald Learmonth (1895–1967), was a Scottish surgeon.

John Learmonth of Dean was Lord Provost of Edinburgh, after whom the Learmonth district of Edinburgh was named.

Noel Fulford Learmonth (1880–1970), was an Australian writer, professor, and naturalist.

Okill Massey Learmonth VC, MC (1894–1917), was a Canadian recipient of the Victoria Cross.

Thomas Learmonth, also known as Thomas the Rhymer (c.1220 – c.1298), was a Scottish laird.

Thomas Livingstone Learmonth (1818–1903), was an early Victorian settler.

Learmonth Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Balcomie, co. Fife). Motto—Spero. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on a chev. sa. three mascles of the first; 2nd and 3rd, az. on a bend ar. three roses .gu., for Balcomie. Crest—A rose slipped ppr.
2) (Livingstone-Learmonth, London, 1870). Mottoes—Dum spiro spero, for Learmonth; Si possim, for Livingstone. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on a chev. sa. three lozenges of the first, for Learmonth; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a mascle az. betw. three gillyflowers slipped gu. a double tressure flory counterflory vert, for Livingstone; the whole within a bordure az. Crests—1st, Learmonth: A dove holding in the beak an olive branch ppr.; 2nd, Livingstone: A dexter hand holding a sabre ppr.
3) (Livingstone-Learmonth, of Parkhall, co. Stirling). As the last, but the bordure engr. ar. Same Crest and Motto.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle
15. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234
16. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
17. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45