Leitch Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Leitch Family Coat of Arms

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Leitch Coat of Arms Meaning

Leitch Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Leitch. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Leitch Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Leitch blazon are the escutcheon, serpent and bend. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and or.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The escutcheon simply represents smaller shield shapes included within the shield, and its close relative, the inescutcheon is just a larger version occupying most of the field. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escutcheon There is no particular significance that can accorded to the escutcheon itself, but attention should be paid to the colour and devices that are borne upon it. The escutcheon may also be added to an existing coat of arms either as recognition of some additional honour (an escutcheon of augmentation”) or in the case where arms that are already quartered are to be combined an escutcheon with the new arms may be placed overall (an ”escutcheon of pretence”). 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 126 & 141

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The serpent Is a typical example of a mythical creature, as real to a person of the middle ages as dogs, cats and elephants are to us today.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Leitch Name

Leitch Origin:

England

Origins of Leitch:

Listed in many spelling forms such as Leach, Leech, and Leitch. It is an English surname. It is frequently given as a metonymic professional name, or to some name heritors as a geographical name. Both origins are Olde English before the 7th century. The first origin is from the word ‘laece’ means ‘a leech, blood sucking animal,’ and as such introducing a doctor, one who applied ‘leeches’ for medical treatment. Secondly if geographical it acquires from the word ‘loecc, an old word ‘lacu’ and which means water. So, it mentions a person who resided by or worked on water. Previous examples of the name documentations derived from real remaining parish records and documents appear as Christopher Leach, named at St. Giles, Cripplegate, London, in January 1629, while in February 1793, John Leitch married Katharine Hood at St. Leonards Parish, Shoreditch, London. The musical writer James Leach (1762 – 1798), was a representative of the King’s Band and was famous for his compositions for fastened instruments, while another outstanding name heritor was William Leighton Leitch (1804 – 1883). He was drawing master to Queen Victoria and the royal family for 22 years.

Variations:

More common variations are: Leeitch, Leaitch, Lewitch, Leuitch, Leitche, Leitcha, Letch, Litch, Lietch, Leetch.

England:

The origins of the surname Leitch were found in Cheshire where people held a family seat from early times. Someone say better before the success of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Edmund le Leche, dated about 1279, in the “Hundred Rolls of Oxfordshire.” It was during the time of King Edward I of England, who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Leitch had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Leitch settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 18th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Leitch who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Robert Leitch settled in New York in 1774.

Some of the people with the surname Leitch who settled in the United States in the 19th century included John. Samuel and William Leitch, both arrived in Pennsylvania between the years 1840 and 1860. Alex Leitch settled in America, in 1892.

The following century saw more Leitch surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Leitch who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Andrey Leitch at the age of 53, shifted to the United States from Hamilton, in 1903. Alfred Leitch at the age of 20, moved to the United States, in 1904. A. Leitch, who landed in America, in 1908. Anne Leitch at the age of 36, shifted to America, in 1908. Charles Nicol Leitch at the age of 64 landed to the United States from Belfast, Ireland, in 1910.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Leitch who settled in Canada in the 20th century included Archibald Leitch at the age of 65 settled in St. Thomas, Canada, in 1912. Christine Leitch at the age of 40, who moved to Montreal, Canada, in 1922

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Leitch who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Dugald Leitch, a Scottish prisoner from Stirling, who shifted aboard the “Asia” in September 1820, settling in New South Wales, Australia. John Leitch landed in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Constance” in 1848. Mary Leitch arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Emily” in 1849. Jane Leitch arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Emily” in 1849. Jane Leitch at the age of 18, landed in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “Emily.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Leitch who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Elizabeth Leitch arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Edwin Fox” in 1875

Here is the population distribution of the last name Leitch: United States 3,967; England 2,425; Canada 2,048; Scotland 1,779; Australia 1,517; South Africa 1,114; Sri Lanka 717; Guyana 648; New Zealand 556; Northern Ireland 453

Notable People:

Archibald Leitch is a Scottish builder.

Cecil Leitch is an English golf player.

David Leitch (settler) (1753–1794), was a founder of Leitch’s Station, Kentucky, United States

David Leitch (actor), was an American actor.

David Leitch (politician) (1923–1988), was an Australian political leader.

David R. Leitch (born 1948), is an American congressman.

Donovan Leitch is a Scottish singer.

Harry Leitch is a Scottish squash player.

Leitch Family Gift Ideas

Browse Leitch family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Scotland). Gu. on a bend engr. or, betw. six fusils of the second, three escutcheons az. Crest—A hand holding a serpent ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escutcheon
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 126 & 141
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49