Lightbody Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lightbody Family Coat of Arms

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Lightbody Coat of Arms Meaning

Lightbody Name Origin & History

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Lightbody Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Lightbody blazon are the mullet, crescent, pale and lion. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 7A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The Pale is one of the major, so called ordinaries, significant objects that extend across the entire field of the shield. The pale being a broad vertical band up the centre of the shield 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pale. In origin, the word probably has its roots in the same place as palisade, a defensive wall made of closely space upright timbers. Indeed, it is possible that the original “pales” arose where a wooden shield was constructed of vertical planks painted in different hues 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, Chapter 1. This is perhaps why Wade, a writer on Heraldic Symbology suggested that denotes “military strength and fortitude” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lightbody Name

Lightbody Origin:

Scotland

Origins of Lightbody:

It is an Anglo-Scottish old surname. There are two possible sources, and over the centuries the two have often become combined in spelling. Originally, if English it is or rather was, perhaps a nickname, one which on the face of it, mentioned a small person, one who was ‘lyt,’ which means little, small. However, given the robust nature of those times, anything is possible, and our current theory is to suggest that like the popular outlaw Little John or John Little, this surname related to an especially large person. However, unless one showed when the name was first ‘given,’ it is almost impossible after some six hundred years and more, to say for real what it meant.

Variations:

More common variations are: Leightbody, Lightybody, Lightboddy, Lightbady.

Scotland:

The surname Lightbody first found in Lancashire where they held a family seat from very early times.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Lightbody had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the individuals with the name Lightbody who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Elizabeth Lightbody, who came to America in 1775. Lightbody Settlers in the United States in the 19th Century. James Lightbody at the age of 37, landed in New York in the year 1812. John Lightbody, who was on record in Jamaica in the year 1825. Thomas Lightbody, who arrived in Philadelphia in the year 1829.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Lightbody who came to Canada in the 19th century included James Lightbody, his wife, and two sons, who settled in Quebec in 1820. James Lightbody, who arrived in Canada in 1820.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lightbody: United States 1,143; England 613; Scotland 453; South Africa 420; Australia 344; Canada 266; Jamaica 107; Wales 68; Northern Ireland 60; New Zealand 28

Notable People:

Gary Lightbody was born in June 1976. He is a multi-instrumentalist, musician, and composer from Northern Ireland famous as the lead musician and rhythm guitarist of the alternative rock band Snow Patrol.

James Davies “Jim” Lightbody (March 1882 – March 1953) was an American middle distance runner, winner of six Olympic medals (two of which are no longer recognized by the International Olympic Committee following its downgrading of the 1906 Games) in the early 20th century. He was born in Pittsburgh and got a B.A degree from the collrge in Muncie, Indiana, he had great success at the 1904 Summer Olympics, held in St. Louis. He was not chosen in any of the three individual events in which he played, but won all three of them.

Robert Lightbody (1802 –July 1874) was an independent nobleman, amateur geologist, and representative of Ludlow Natural History Society. He was born in Liverpool in the year 1802. His parents, John Lightbody and Harriet Hughes, were non-conformists and part of the Unitarian parish. In 1829, he still had a connection with the Liverpool area when he joined as a clerk to George Ashby Pritt, Liverpool attorney. In 1840, he married Jane Peele in Shrewsbury, and by 1841 he migrated to Llanllwchaiarn in Wales. During his time in Wales, at least four of his six children were born, and he was a significant landholder. In 1852, after a short return to the Liverpool area, he traveled to Castle Square House, Ludlow, the actual residential property which he finally bought and settled in with his family until his death.

Hannah Greg (née Lightbody) (1766–1834) was the daughter of a wealthy Unitarian Liverpool trader, Adam Lightbody (1729–1778) and Elizabeth Tylston (1735–1801). She was the youngest of 3 sisters. After an education in a regular day school in Stoke Newington, she came back to Liverpool and married Samuel Greg in 1789, including the Presbyterian to her Unitarian faith, Cross Street Church, and the powerful network Manchester and Liverpool dealing and banking families. Samuel Greg was the owner of Quarry Bank Mill in Styal (built 1784).

Lightbody Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Glasgow, 1786). Motto—Clarior e tenebris. Az. on a pale or, betw. two mullets in chief and as many crescents in base ar. a lion ramp. gu. Crest—A star issuant from a cloud ppr.
2) (Liverpool, 1767). Motto—Clarior e tenebris. Az. on a pale engr. or, betw. two mullets in chief of the second and as many crescents in base ar. a lion ramp. gu. Crest—A star issuing from a cloud ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
7. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pale
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, Chapter 1
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47