Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Dorset). Gu. three bucks’ heads couped ar.
2) Sa. three leopards’ faces ar.
3) (co. Cambridge, and London). Gu. a demi lion ramp. or (another, ar.) a bordure sa. bezantee.
4) (arms in a window in Christ's Church, Oxford. Visit. Oxon, 1564). Sa. a pelican in her piety ppr.
5) Ar. two bars sa. a bend gu.
6) Gu. three bucks’ heads couped ar.
7) (co. Dorset). Sa. a pelican in her piety ar. vulned gu. nest or.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Linde Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Linde Origin:

Germany, Scotland, Switzerland

Origins of Linde:

Listed in over forty spelling forms from Lind, Linde, Linden, and Line or Lyne, to Lingner, Verlinden, Van Lint, Terlinden and Lindman, this popular surname is of Germanic pre 7th-century sources. It has two possible origins. The first origin of the surname may be a geographical name for a person who resided by a linda tree, the old word for the new lime tree. Why lime trees should have formed such a famous surname is not certain, but it may be that the lime was related to pagan religions. The second origin is related to some name ancestors at least, the derivation is from the old female given the name "Line," an aphetic kind of Catherine, and of many other names, like Emmeline and Adeline. These may be associated as Frankish and after that Norman French names. The first known recording is perhaps that of "Lina" (without surname), in the 1181 'Pipe Rolls' of Oxfordshire, England. The surname was first listed in Germany in the 13th Century, and previous recordings contain as Cunrad Linde of Beuren, who finds in the documents of that town in 1305. Other recordings in England contains the wedding of John Line and Joan Withy in August 1549, at St. Lawrence Jewry, London, while amongst the old travelers in the New World was Colonel Christopher Line, who listed as owning two hundred and seventy-two acres of land in Barbados in December 1679.

Variations:

More common variations are: Lindey, Lindie, Lindoe, Lindhe, Lwinde, Lindee, Lindae, Liunde, Lindwe, Lionde.

Scotland:

The surname Linde first appeared in Ayrshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Air), an old district in the southwestern Strathclyde area of Scotland, that today build the Conference Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire. The name Lynne originally meaning is "a waterfall," first recorded in the area of Dalry in the years 1200-1300.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Hainrich Linde of Konstanz, in the city record of the year. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Linde had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Linde settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in 18th, and 19th. Some of the individuals with the name Linde who landed in the United States in the 17th century included Carl Linde, who landed on Long Island in the year 1781.

The following century saw much more Linde surnames arrive. Some of the population with the name Linde who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Frantz Linde, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the year 1802. Jorge DeLa Linde, who arrived in Puerto Rico in the year 1857. William Harris Linde, who landed in Arkansas in 1872.

Australia:

People with the surname Linde who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Hugh Linde at the age of 27, arrived in South Australia in 1847 aboard the ship "Gellert."

Here is the population distribution of the last name Linde: South Africa 7,872; Germany 6,254; Sweden 4,162; United States 3,693; Spain 2,053; Latvia 1,940; Denmark 1,421; Netherlands 1,156; Poland 1,002; Norway 597.

Notable People:

Andrei Linde was a Russian physicist.

Bo Linde was a Swedish songwriter.

Dennis Linde was an American composer.

Hans-Martin Linde was a flute and recorder player.

Hans A. Linde is a resigned judge of the Oregon Supreme Court.

Johan Linde was an Australian fighter.

Klaus Linde is a German alternativive medicine researcher.

Mikko Lindström is a founding representative of the Finnish rock band HIM.

Linde Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Linde blazon are the leopard’s face, bucks’ head and pelican in piety. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, gules and or .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.3. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 4. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 5, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 9. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 10

The chief is an area across the top of the field 11. It appears in many different forms and can itself be charged with other charges and ordinaries, 12, being treated almost as if it were a completely separate area. In its simplest form it can be clearly identified. Early examples include the award by Henry III of England to the knight Robert de MORTEYN BRETON of Ermine, a chief gules.

The parrot is a fairly recent usage, but the ancient form of popinjay was more common 13. Commonly coloured vert (green) with beak and legs gules (red) it is usually depicted with a high degree of realism. 14

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References

  • 1 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 2 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 3 The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
  • 4 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
  • 5 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 6 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 7 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
  • 8 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 9 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
  • 10 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
  • 11 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40
  • 12 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief
  • 13 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Parrot
  • 14 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P249