Litchfield Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Litchfield Family Coat of Arms

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Litchfield Coat of Arms Meaning

Litchfield Name Origin & History

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Litchfield Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Litchfield blazon are the crescent, sword and cross crosslet fitchee. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and gules.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. Indeed, the sheer variety of different swords 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302 can be bewildering and expaining the difference between a scimitar and a falchion is perhaps best left to the expert! If a charge is described just as a simple sword then it will have a straight blade and cross handle, that may be of a different colour, and, unless specified, points upwards. Wade, quoting the earlier writer Guillim, signifies the use of the sword as representing “Government and Justice”.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, having an additional cross bar on each arm. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103 The final addition fitchee simply means pointed, and indicates that the lower end is pointed, as if it is to be struck into the ground. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Litchfield Name

Litchfield Origin:

England

Origin of Litchfield:

It is an uncommon surname which is associated with English locational origins either from Litchfield, southeast of Stafford in Staffordshire, or from Litchfield in Hampshire. The ancient area, first listed as Letocetum in the Romano-British times, and also listed as Liccedfeld in about 890 in “the Ancient English formation of Bede’s ‘Historia ecclesiastica,” which is thus named from the British (Pre-Roman) “Letoceton” which means “grey woodland or forest.” In Ancient English it had been shortened to Licced, combined with the component “field,” which means grazing or accessible country, which is recorded as, “available or open land in Licced wild.” After sometime the area, listed as Liveselle in the Domesday Book was authentically named with Ancient English before the 7th century as “Hlifgesella” acquired from the word “hilf’, which means shield, and “scylf,” which means shelf. After sometime it formed into “hlith” which means hill or ramp, also “feld,” which means accessible or open country. In December 1544 Felyppa Lytchfeld, a child, was named in St. Stephen Coleman Street, London. An unusual name holder was Harriett Litchfield, (nee Hay), an artist at Covent Garden from 1797 to 1812.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Litchfeld, Litchfild, Litchifield, Leitchfield, Lietcfield, Letcfield, Latchfield, Litchfild, Luthcfield, Lytchfield.

England:

The name Litchfield first originated in Staffordshire at Lichfied, a city and division itself. This area, known by Bede Licidfeld, and by Ingulphus and by Henry of Huntingdon Lichfeld. Both expressing “the land of the buried,” is assumed to have acquired its name from the suffering of more than 1000 Christians, who are forenamed to have been murdered here in the time of Ruler Diocletian.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Richard Lichfield, which was dated 1450, in the “Oxford University Register.” It was during the time of King Henry VI, who was known to be the “The Founder of Eton,” 1422 – 1461. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Litchfield settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Litchfield who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Laurence Litchfield, who landed in Massachusetts in 1639. Lawrence Litchfield, who arrived in New England in 1646.

Some of the people with the name Litchfield who settled in the United States in the 18th century included William Litchfield, who landed in America in 1805.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Litchfield who settled in Australia in the 18th century included Charles William Litchfield, Ellen Litchfield, Agnes Frederica Litchfield, Frederica Henry Litchfield, and George Charles Litchfield; all these people arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “D’Auvergne” in the same year in 1839.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Litchfield: United States 5,308; England 2,086; Australia 1,181; Scotland 98; Canada 369; South Africa 438; Ireland 44; Spain 38; New Zealand 215; Wales 124.

Notable People:

David Litchfield (born 1975), is a British security researcher from the United Kingdom. Anne Saita, a writer for Information Security Magazine, named him along with his brother Mark Litchfield, “World’s Best Bug Hunters” in December 2003.

Edward H. Litchfield (1914–1968), is an American professor and the twelfth President (1956–1965) of the University of Pittsburgh. He is famous for a major administration of the university, he ultimately retired from his post in July 1965.

Elisha Litchfield (1785–1859), was an American businessman and congressman from New York.

Frederick Henry Litchfield (1832-1867), usually famously knowsn as Fred, is a South Australian related to the early expedition of the Northern communities, and more specifically with the discovery of gold there.

John Litchfield (1899–1918), was in the United States Navy during World War I.

Max Litchfield (born 1995), is a British swimmer who competed for Great Britain in the 2016 Olympics.

Litchfield Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Motto—Semper pugnare paratus. Or, a sword in pale azure. surmounted by a crescent sable. all between two crosses crosslet fitchee gules. Crest— An arm in armour embowed, holding a sword ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché