Loader Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Loader Family Coat of Arms

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Loader Coat of Arms Meaning

Loader Name Origin & History

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Loader Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Loader blazon are the lion, pale and mullet. The two main tinctures (colors) are argent and gules.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 9A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The Pale is one of the major, so called ordinaries, significant objects that extend across the entire field of the shield. The pale being a broad vertical band up the centre of the shield 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pale. In origin, the word probably has its roots in the same place as palisade, a defensive wall made of closely space upright timbers. Indeed, it is possible that the original “pales” arose where a wooden shield was constructed of vertical planks painted in different hues 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, Chapter 1. This is perhaps why Wade, a writer on Heraldic Symbology suggested that denotes “military strength and fortitude” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 15A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Loader Name

loader Origin:

England, Ireland

Origins of loader:

This unusual and interesting name, noted in the surname spellings of Loader, Lodder, Loder, Loades, Loadsman, Loadman, etc., has two possible origins. The first of which is an Anglo-Saxon geographical name showing a person who resided by a road or a watercourse. The origin is from the Olde English pre 7th Century word “lad,” itself acquired from the verb “laedan,” to lead or to go. Where the word “lad” is a component of a placename, it usually relates to a human-made waste channel. The second possible origin is from the old professional surname for a vehicle or Carter, acquired from the Middle English “lode(n)” to carry or transport, acquired from ‘lad’ as above directed by “lade(n),” to load. Early examples of the surname records contain as Simon Le Lodere, in Warwickshire in the year 1332, and John ate Lode in Sussex in 1327. John Lademan shows in the Premium Rolls of York in 1301, while Annys Loadman, the daughter of Robert Loadman, named at the famous parish of St. Botolph without Aldergate, London, in July 1610. The original coat of arms given in London, although of uncertain date, has the blazon of a silver field, a red pale, over all a black lion rampant. The crest is a red chapeau loaded with two lions proper supporting a form.

Variations:

More common variations are: Loder, Lader, Lauder, Leader, Lodder, Lowder, Louder, Lawder, Laider, ladder.

England:

The surname Loader first appeared in Dorset where they held a family seat as Lords of the Estate. After the Battle of Hastings in 1066, William, Duke of Normandy, having controlled over King Harold, given most of Britain to his many successful Barons. It was not uncommon to find a Baron, or a priest, with 60 or more Lordships spread all over the country. These he gave to his sons, nephews and other junior lines of his family and they became known as under-tenants. They picked the Norman system of surnames which identified the under-tenant with his holdings so as to separate him from the senior stem of the family.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Emma la Lodere, dated about 1279, in the “Oxfordshire Hundred Rolls.” It was during the time of King Edward I who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272 – 1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname loader had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname loader landed in the United States in the 17th century. Some of the people with the name loader who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Loader, who landed in Maryland in 1642. William Loader, who arrived in Maryland in the same year 1642.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname loader who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Elizabeth Loader arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Sir Edward Parry” in 1849. Joseph Loader arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship “Sultana.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname loader who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included James Loader landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840. James Loader arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship “Gertrude” in 1841. Judith Loader arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship “Gertrude” in 1841. Daniel Loader arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Halcione” in 1870. Ann M. Loader, aged 32, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Halcione” in 1870.

Here is the population distribution of the last name loader: England 2,60; Australia 1,422; South Africa 1,078; United States 802; New Zealand 606; Philippines 580; Canada 400; Wales 124; Scotland 79 ; Chile 72.

Notable People:

Christian Loader (born 1973), is a Welsh rugby union player.

Clive Loader (born 1953), is an RAF officer and Leicestershire Police and Crime Commissioner.

Colin Loader (born 1931), is a New Zealand rugby union player.

Bill Loader (born 1944), is an Australian philosopher.

Brian Loader (born 1958), is a British scholar and researcher.

Loader Family Gift Ideas

Browse Loader family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. a pale gu. over all a lion pass. sa. Crest—On a chapeau gu. two lions ramp. supporting a garb ppr.
2) Six mullets, three, two, and one. Crest—A dragon pass. ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
9. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pale
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, Chapter 1
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
15. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105