Lomax Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lomax Family Coat of Arms

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Lomax Coat of Arms Meaning

Lomax Name Origin & History

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Lomax Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Lomax blazon are the escallop, greyhound and fleur-de-lis. The four main tinctures (colors) are ermine, gules, argent and sable.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

Unlike many of the creatures to be found in heraldry, the Greyhound is shown in a very natural aspect and lifelike poses. 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204 It is probably the most common member of the dog family to be found in arms 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog, and Wade suggests that we see in its appearance the suggestion of“courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 18Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 20A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lomax Name

Lomax Origin:

England

Origins of Lomax:

The surname of Lomax is said to have derived within the country of England. This surname of Lomax is a locational surname; this means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have taken a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In the case of the surname of Lomax, there are places within England that are now “lost villages,” that bore the name of Lomax, specifically within the area of Lancashire County. The word itself derives from the Old English, Pre 7th Century word of “lumm,” which can be translated to mean a pool, and the combination of the element of “-halh,” which can be translated to mean “a nook,” or “a recess.” Together these elements make up the name of Lumhalghs, from which the surname of Lomax derived. These names and locations have all disappeared from the maps of Britain, causing them to be known as “lost” villages or cities. It is believed that over three thousand villages and hamlets have disappeared from British maps to make way for sheep pastures at the height of the wool trade in the 14th Century, and the natural causes of the Black Death in the late 14th Century. Thus, the surname of Lomax is not as prominent as it was in the Middle Ages.

Variations:

More common variations are: Lomas, Lumox, Lummux, Lummus, Loomis, Lomath, Lowmouth,

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Lomax can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Elizabeth Lomas, who was baptized at Farnworth in the area of Lancashire in the year of 1549. This christening occurred under the reign of one King Edward VI of England, who ruled from the year of 1547, until his death in the year of 1553. Other mentions of the surname of Lomax within the country of England include one Alice Lomax, who married one Roger Woe in the area of Middleton by Oldham in Lancashire County in the year of 1562, while one Elizabeth Luemoth was baptized in London at St. George’s Chapel, Hanover Square in the year of 1764.

United States of America:

Within the 17th Century, it became common for disgruntled European citizens to grab their things and migrate to the United States of America, which at that time was known as the New World, or The Colonies. Among those who migrated to the United States of America was one Thomas Lomax, who arriving in the state of Maryland in the year of 1664, was the first recorded person in the United States of America who bore the surname of Lomax. Shortly after, in the year of 1668, one Blanch Lomax arrived in the state of Maryland, just four years later.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lomax: United States 10,586; England 5,964; Liberia 2,295; Australia 774; Canada 606; South Africa 548; Germany 370; New Zealand 265; Wales 260; Scotland 171; France 159; Brazil 95

Notable People:

William H. Lomax, who served as a Candidate for the United States Representative from the state of Massachusetts in the 15th District in the year of 1924, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Terrence J. Lomax Jr, who served as a Candidate for the United States Representative from the state of Massachusetts in the 14th District in the year of 1942, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Tennent Lomax (1858-1902) who served as the Secretary of the Alabama Democratic Party in the year of 1878 to the year of 1888, who served as the Montgomery County Solicitor in the year of 1887 to the year of 1902, who served as a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Alabama in the year of 1888, in the year of 1896, and in the year of 1900, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Hutson J. Lomax, who served as a Delegate to the South Carolina State Constitutional Convention from Abbeville County in the year of 1868, and who was a politician from America

E. M. Lomax, who served as a Delegate to the Republican National Convention from the state of Missouri in the year of 1912, and who was a Republican politician from America.

Lomax Family Gift Ideas

Browse Lomax family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (St. George’s, Hanover Square, Westminster). Erm. a greyhound courant sa. betw. three escallops gu. Crest—A dexter hand issuing from a heart brandishing a scymitar all ppr.
2) (Parkhurst, co. Surrey). Ar. a greyhound courant betw. three escallops sa. Crest—A demi greyhound ar. collared gu.
3) (Clayton Hall, co. Lancaster). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, per pale or and sa.onabend cotised erm. three escallops gu., for Lomax; 2nd, ar. a griffin segreant sa. armed or, for Grimshaw: 3rd, ar. a cross sa. betw. four bezants, for Clayton. Crest—Out of a mural crown a demi lion gu. collared and holding an escallop. Motto—Fato prudentia major.
4) (co. Hertford). Erm. a greyhound courant sa., betw. three escallops gu., quartering ar. two bends sa., for Kaye. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi lion gu. holding an escallop or.
5) (granted to Richard Lomax, Esq., Inner Temple, London). Motto—Nil nisi de jure. Or, on a bend betw. two fleurs-de-lis gu. an annulet betw. two escallops of the field. Crest—A demi lion erased per bend or and gu. charged with two fleurs-de-lis counterclmnced, and holding betw. the paws an escallop gu. within an annulet or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69
18. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
20. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489