Lugg Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lugg Family Coat of Arms

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Lugg Coat of Arms Meaning

Lugg Name Origin & History

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Lugg Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Lugg blazon are the bendlet wavy, pelican and wings. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, argent and gules .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bendlet, we should not be surprised to discover is a small bend. Like the bend, the bendlet extends from corner to corner but is much narrower, and there can be up to four of them 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bendlet. They may also occur with decorative edges to enable them to be distinguished from similar arms. The decorative edge pattern Wavy, sometimes written as undy is, for obvious reasons, associated with both water and the sea 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40. Indeed, a roundel with alternating bars of azure and argent (blue and white) is known by the shorthand term fountain, representing water at the bottom of a well 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water. Other colours have also been used and the result can be very pleasing to the eye.

The pelican is often associated with parenthood and “devoted and self sacrificing charity”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P77-78 It is almost always shown with its young in their nest (in its piety) or pricking its breast in readiness to feed its young with its own blood (vulning herself. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pelican

Wings are frequently observed in coats of arms. Unless otherwise specified they should be shown as eagle’s wings, with a realistic appearance. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wing They can appear singly or in pairs, in which form they are very often found in the crest, which rests above the shield in a full achievement of arms. Wade, quoting Quillim, suggests that the use of the wing on the shield signifies “celerity and protection or covering”. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P73

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lugg Name

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Lugg had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Lugg landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th, and 18th. Some of the people with the name Lugg who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Peter Lugg, who landed in Virginia in 1666. Andrew Lugg, who landed in New England in 1675.

The following century saw more Lugg surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Lugg who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included John Lugg, who came to Virginia in 1703.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Lugg who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Thomas Lugg arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Waterloo” in 1840. John Lugg arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Pakenham” in 1849. James Nicholls Lugg, at the age of 29, arrived in South Australia in 1853 aboard the ship “Calabar.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lugg: England 699; Australia 529; United States 472; South Africa 365; Jamaica 303; Wales 135; Canada 94; Norway 39; New Zealand 38; Scotland 33.

Notable People:

Milton Delugg (December 1918 – April 2015), born in Los Angeles, was an American musician, writer, and arranger. He joined the University of California, Los Angeles. His initial musical training was on a piano. Moving to the accordion came as the result of a gift. “When my dad gave me an accordion I learned how to play jazz on it,” he said. “I grew up in Los Angeles, and it wasn’t long before I had a monopoly on any calls for jazz accordionists.

William Lugg (June 1852 –December 1939) was an English actor and musician of the late Victorian and Edwardian eras. He had stage work starting with roles in many Gilbert and Sullivan operas and lasting for over four decades in drama, comedy, and musical theater. After that in his career, he appeared in nine silent films in the early years of British cinema.

Lugg Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(co. Gloucester). Gu. on a bend betw. two cotises ar. a bendlet wavy az. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a pelican's head vulning betw. two wings ppr.

1 Comment

  • Tessa Idrees says:

    Hi I am trying to find an old friend of mine John Lugg went to school with us 1986/87 Belfast High School Mpumalanga South Africa…we are planning a Reunion 14th October 2017 and he is the last of our school peers on the list we are needing to contact…I would appreciate if you could give us insight in helping to locate him..Kind Regards Tessa (Strydom) Idrees

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bendlet
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P77-78
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pelican
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wing
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P73