Lund Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lund Family Coat of Arms

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Lund Coat of Arms Meaning

Lund Name Origin & History

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Lund Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Lund blazon are the lion, gyronny, covered cup and bezant. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and azure .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 11A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Gyronny is a very distinctive pattern covering the whole field of the shield, being a series of triangles, drawn from the edges and meeting in the centre of the shield 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gyronny. Each triangle is known as a gyron, and these sometimes appear as charges in their own right 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 55. Wade suggests that the use of gyrons upon a shield should be taken to denote “unity”.

Cups of all kinds have been popular charges on coats of arms since at least the 14th century. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cup In appearance and description they range from simple drinking pots (GERIARE of Lincoln – Argent three drinking pots sable) to covered cups, more like chalices in appearance. 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P288. These were borne by the BUTLER family in reference to their name and Wade suggests that their appearance may also refer to holy communinion within the church. 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lund Name

Lund

The name Lund is Scandinavian in origin but variations were also found to exists in England and Germany. The easiest translation of the name comes from the Old Norse-Viking word “lundr” meaning a thicket, stand, or grove of trees. Many of the ancient names such as Lund and its variations in spelling, acted as an indicator or representation of the birthplace of the person by identifying easily recognizable landmarks. This worked well for the small settlements which existed at this time because people rarely traveled far from their homes and were familiar with the surrounding landscape.

The name Lund was has been determined it came to Britain during the Viking age by the Norse adventurers. Variations in the name’s spelling exists, as with many names which date back to the early centuries. These variations of the name include; Lund, Lun, Lunn, Lwn, and Lunt among others. The variation in spelling of names during this time period can be attributed to a lack of continuity regarding guidelines for spelling which was compounded by the diversity of languages in use in European countries at this time. The first records of any variation of the name to appear in England is that of Ralph de Lunde who appears in the Yorkshire Pipe Rolls records from 1183. Additional references regarding bearers of name can be found in official records; John de Lound of Suffolk in 1327, John de Lound in 1327 and John Lunt in 1524, both of Suffolk, and Gilbert Lunt of Litherand in 1568.

The first records of immigrants to America include Edmund Lund in 1653 and Thomas Lund in 1664, both of whom landed in Virginia, John Lund in 1678 who landed in Maryland, and Niels Lund in 1761 who landed in New York.

Worldwide, the highest concentration of people with the surname Lund are found in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Australia, and the United Kingdom. Aside from the surname, Lund is also the name of the oldest town in Sweden in the country’s southern region. The original village was settled in the 10th century around 990. The current location where the present-day city is found was thought to have been settled around 1020.

The location of the settlement was moved approximately three miles from the original site on orders from the king at that time, Sweyn I. The new location offered advantages in defending the settlement not found at the original location. Lund became the temporary capital of Sweden from 1716 until 1718 when King Charles XII made Lund his residence,

Lund is home to Lund Cathedral, the original Archdiocese for all of Scandinavia. King Eric I of Denmark made the pilgrimage to Rome personally to request the creation of the an archdiocese to include all of Scandinavia from Pope Pascall III. In 1104, King Eric’s request was granted. Bishop Asser Thorkilsson was named archbishop of Scandinavian, Lund was named as the headquarters, and construction began on the cathedral.

Lund University one of the oldest, largest, and most revered universities in northern Europe is located in Lund as are the headquarters for The Royal Swedish Physiographic Society. The Royal Swedish Physiographic Society is part of the The Royal Academies of Sweden. While the Royal Academies are all independent, they are founded on Royal Order. The Royal Swedish Physiographic Society received a Royal Charter on March, 6, 1778 from King Gustav III.

Notable persons of the surname Lund:

Lieutenant General Sir Otto Marling Lund. He served as the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief of Anti-Aircraft Command during World War II for the British Army. For his meritorious and/or distinguished service during wartime he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order and was Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath. Sir Henry Simpson Lunn was a British Methodist Minister and humanitarian. For his service and humanitarian work, in 1910, he was made a Knight Bachelor. Sir Arnold Lund was a British athlete, writer, and son of Sir Henry Simpson Lund. He received his Knighthood in 1952. Kristin Skogen Lund is a Norwegian business woman who has been the director and CEO of several large multi-national corporations. Carsten Lund, PhD, is an American theoretical computer scientist who works at one of the largest telecommunication companies currently in operation.

Lund Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Parson's Green, Fulham, co. Middlesex, and co. York). Per chev. or and gu. three lions pass. counterchanged.
2) (Shelford, co. Cambridge, and co. York). Gyronny of eight ar. and az. on a bordure engr. sa. as many plates.
3) (Lovely Hall, Blackburn, co. Lancaster; granted to Thomas Lund, Esq., Mayor of Blackburn, 1863-4). Motto—Semper fidelis. Gyronny of eight ar. and gu. three covered cups or, a chief indented sa. charged with annulets of the third and bezants alternately. Crest—A demi lion ramp. gu. charged with two covered cups in pale, as in the arms, and holding betw. the paws a plate, thereon a cross pattée throughout also gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
11. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gyronny
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 55
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cup
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P288
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117