Macaulay Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Macaulay Family Coat of Arms

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Macaulay Coat of Arms Meaning

Macaulay Name Origin & History

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Macaulay Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Macaulay blazon are the buckle, arrow and chequy. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and argent .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100 The buckle may fall into this category, it is present in a surprising number of different forms and has a long heritage in use, 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Buckle being considered honourable bearings and are said to “signify victorious fidelity in authority”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P115

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The regular prescence of the arrow, both singly and in groups is evidence of this. In British heraldry a lone arrow normally points downward, but in the French tradition it points upwards. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Arrow. The presence of an arrow in a coat of arms is reckoned to indicate “martial readiness” by Wade. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

Chequy (a word with a surprising number of different spellings!) is what is known as a treatment, a repeating pattern usually used to fill the whole background of the shield with a series of alternately coloured squares 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy. These squares are usually quite small (there should be at least 20 in total), giving the appearance of a chess board, but any combination of colours may be used. It can also be used as a patterning on some of the larger ordinaries, such as the pale and fess, in which case there are three rows of squares. Wade, an authority on heraldic meaning groups chequy with all those heraldic features that are composed of squares and believes that they represent “Constancy”, but also quotes another author Morgan, who says that they can also be associated with “wisdom…verity, probity…and equity”, and offers in evidence the existence of the common English saying that an honest man is a ”Square Dealer” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Macaulay Name

Macaulay Origin:

Ireland, Scotland

Origins of Macaulay:

The MacAulays of Dumbartonshire, Scotland, acquire their name from the Olde Gaelic “Mac-Amhalghaidh.” The Gaelic addition of “mac” which means “son of,” and the particular by name Amhalghaidh, from “amhail,” like unto, and “ghaidh,” the inherited form of “gad,” which means green or limb. The hebridean MacAulays, on the other hand, claim decline from one, MacAmhlaibh, i.e. “son of Amlaib”, the Olde Gaelic form of the Norse particular name Anleifr, combination of the components “ans”, which means god, and “leifr”, which means antique(from “Leifa”, to leave). Scandinavian impact was especially strong in the north of Scotland, and many Scandinavian names were included in the basic language. Two separate MacAuley tribes live in Ireland, the one belonging to district Westmeath and the other attached to the district of Fermanagh. Catherine McAuley (1787 – 1841), foundress of the Order of Mercy sisters, is the most popular Irish name ancestor. Thomas Baington Macaulous, (1800 – 1859) released his “History of England” in 1848. He became king rector of Glasgow University, in 1849 and formed Baron Macaulay of Rothley, 1857.

Variations:

More common variations are: MacAullay, Maccaulay, Machaulay, Macaulayy, McAulay, MacAuly, Macaula, Maculay, Mac Aullay, Mc Caulay.

Scotland:

The surname Macaulay first appeared in district Westmeath, in the Irish Midlands, county of Leinster, where at one time the area which is now Ballyloughnoe was once named as “McGawley’s Country.”

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Iwar McAulay of Lennox, dated about 1326, in the “The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland.” It was during the time of King Robert who was known to be the “The Bruce of Scotland,” dated 1306-1329. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Macaulay had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Macaulay settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Macaulay who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Kenneth MacAulay settled in Philadelphia in 1774. Kenneth MacAulay landed in Philadelphia in 1774.

The following century saw much more Macaulay surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Macaulay who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Commodore Macaulay, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1850. John Macaulay landed in St Clair County, Illinois in 1871.

Canada:

The following century saw much more Macaulay surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Macaulay who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Mr. James Macaulay U.E. who settled in Canada c. 1784.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Macaulay: Nigeria 35,458; Canada 3,523; United States 3,210; England 3,087; Scotland 2,146; Australia 1,277; South Africa 1,169; Cameroon 892; New Zealand 414; Germany 269.

Notable People:

Archie Macaulay (1915–1993), was a Scottish football player and manager.

Catharine Macaulay (1731–1791), was an English professor.

Colin Macaulay (1760–1836) was a Slavery advocate and supporter.

David Macaulay (born 1946), is an American writer and artist.

Francis Sowerby Macaulay (1862–1937), was an English mathematician.

Frederick Macaulay (1882–1970), was an economist of the Institutionalist School.

George Macaulay (1897–1940), was an English cricket player.

George Campbell Macaulay (1852–1915), was a Classical scholar of Herodotus.

Herbert Macaulay (1864–1946), was a Nigerian leader.

Helene Macaulay (born 1961), is a celebrity makeup artist.

James Macaulay (1759–1822), was a specialist and medical official in Upper Canada.

James Buchanan Macaulay (1793–1859), was a Canadian advocate.

John Macaulay (politician) (1792–1857), was a politician in Upper Canada.

Kenneth Macaulay (politician) (1815–1867), was an English political leader.

Kyle Macaulay (born 1986), is a Scottish professional football player.

Leopold Macaulay (1887–1979), was a Canadian political leader.

Marc Macaulay (born 1948), is an American actor.

Macaulay Family Gift Ideas

Browse Macaulay family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Ardincaple, co. Argyll). Gu. two arrows in saltire ar. surmounted of a fess chequy of the second and first betw. three buckles or.
2) (Edinburgh, 1672). Motto—Dulce periculum. The same, within a bordure indented or. Crest—A boot couped at the ankle, thereon a spur all ppr.
3) (Baron Macaulay; extinct 1859). Motto—Dulce periculum. Gu. two arrows in saltire, points downward ar. surmounted by as many barrulets compony or and az. betw. two buckles in pale of the third, a bordure engr. also of the third. Crest—Upon a rock a boot ppr. thereon a spur or. Supporters—Two herons ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Buckle
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P115
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Arrow
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100