Makepeace Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Makepeace Family Coat of Arms

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Makepeace Coat of Arms Meaning

Makepeace Name Origin & History

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Makepeace Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Makepeace blazon are the cross crosslet fitchee, leopard, dove and unicorn. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and gules .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.6The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, having an additional cross bar on each arm. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103 The final addition fitchee simply means pointed, and indicates that the lower end is pointed, as if it is to be struck into the ground. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? Nevertheless, real animals 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191 are perhaps one of the most common sights on coats of arms, especially animals of European origin. The leopard Is a typical example of these.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. In truth, despite the proliferation of species, the actual depictions can sometimes be hard to distinguish! The dove is an example of this, closely related birds such as pigeon and stock dove are frequently mentioned in arms but visually almost identical. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dove The dove itself is said to represent “loving constancy and peace” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P80, the other birds possibly some play on words with the family name (PIDGEON for example).

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Makepeace Name

Makepeace Origin:

England, France

Origins of Makepeace:

This interesting name acquires from the old English “Mak(en),” which means to make, and “Pais,” which means peace and originally given as a nickname to a judge or one recognized for his skill in ending noise. The surname first noted in the first half of the 13th Century. One Thomas Makepays, witness, shows in the 1340 Fines Court Rolls of Staffordshire, and Joan Makepeace was the name given to the daughter of Edward 11 (1307 – 1327) when the extended war with the Bruces of Scotland slightly appeased by her marriage. One of the earliest records of the name in London was the wedding of Elizabeth Makepeace and Christopher Hodgkins in the Parish of St. Botolph’s, (Bishopsgate) Record in July 1564. William Makepeace Thackeray (1811 – 1863), author of “Vanity Fair,” was a famous ancestor of the name. The Royal symbol most related to the family given to William Makepeace of Pensham Court, District of Worcester in 1724 and has the blazon of a blue shield, on a gold fesse between two gold leopards’ passant, three red cross crosslets fitchee.

Variations:

More common variations are: Mackepeace, Maekepeace, Make Peace, Makepace, Makepece, Makepeace, Makepiece, Makepease, Makepeice, Makepeas.

England:

The surname Makepeace first appeared in Warwickshire where they held a family seat from old times and their first records developed on the early poll rolls derived by the early Kings of Britain to manage the rate of taxation of their services.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Gregory Makepais, dated about 1219, in the “Register of the Freemen of Leicester.” It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Makepeace had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Makepeace landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Makepeace who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Thomas Makepeace settled in Boston in 1630. Thomas Makepeace, who arrived in Boston, Massachusetts in 1635. John Makepeace, who landed in Virginia in 1657. George Makepeace settled in Virginia in 1663. Ann Makepeace, who landed in Maryland in 1672.

People with the surname Makepeace who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Anne Makepeace settled in Maryland in 1733. Elizabeth Makepeace settled in Virginia in 1770.

The following century saw much more Makepeace surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Makepeace who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Henry Makepeace, who came to Arkansas in 1885.

New Zealand:

Individuals with the surname Makepeace who landed in New Zealand in the 19th century included John Makepeace landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1840.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Makepeace: England 1,479; Guatemala 1,476; United States 840; South Africa 438; Australia 410; Canada 259; Germany 134; Wales 56; Norway 39; Scotland 33.

Notable People:

Chris Makepeace (born 1964), is a Canadian film and television actor.

George Makepeace Towle (August 1841, Washington, D.C. – August 1893, Brookline, Massachusetts) was an American advocate, leader, and writer. He is famous for his translations of Jules Verne’ s works, in his 1873 translation of Around the World in Eighty Days.

Harry Makepeace (1881–1952), was an English sportsman.

John Makepeace (born 1939), is a British furniture designer and producer.

John Makepeace Bennett (1921–2010), was a computer scientist.

Jonathan Makepeace (1774–1850), was an American producer of snuff tobacco and political leader.

Mary Lou Makepeace was an activist.

Reginald Makepeace (1887–1918), was a British World War I flying expert.

Makepeace Family Gift Ideas

Browse Makepeace family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Pensham Court, co. Worcester, Middle Temple, London, and co. Warwick; granted by Anstis, Garter, 1724, to William Makepeace, and the descendants of his father, William Makepeace of co. Warwick). (London, and Warfield, co. Berks). Az. on a fesse betw. two leopards pass. or, three crosses crosslet fitchee gu. Crest—A leopard pass. reguard. or, resting the dexter foot on a shield gu. charged with a cross crosslet fitchée gold.
2) Same Arms. Crest—A unicorn’s head ar. betw. two laurel branches orleways vert.
3) Az. on a fesse betw. two leopards pass. or, three crosses crosslet gu. Crest—A dove bolding in the beak an olive branch all ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dove
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P80