Manlove Coat of Arms

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co Stafford). Gu. a chev. erm. betw. three anchors or.
2) (Ashborne, co. Derby, originally from co. Stafford). Az. a chev. betw. three anchors erm. Crest—Out of a mural coronet gu. a cubit arm erect, vested erminois, cuffed ar. grasping in the hand ppr. a flaming sword of the third.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Manlove Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Variations:
More common variations are: Montlovier, Monlovier, Montloviez, Monloviez, Montloviait, Monloviait, Monlovias, Montloviais, Monloviaies, Montloviaies, Montlovié, Monlovie’, Montlovié, Monlovie’e, De Montlovier, De Montlouvier, Montlouvier, Du Montlouvier, Monlauvier, De Monlauvier, Manlove and much more.

England:
The surname Manlove first found in Savoy (French: Savoie) in the Rhone-Alpes region of the French Alps, where this noble family held a family seat from old times.

United States of America:
Some of the people with the name Manlove who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John, Mark, Christopher, Ann, and William Manlove, a family who came to Maryland in the year 1665.  Ann Manlove, who arrived in Maryland in the year 1665.  Christopher Manlove, who landed in Maryland in 1665.  George Manlove, who came to Maryland in the year 1665.  Hannah Manlove, who landed in Maryland in the year 1665. People with the surname Manlove who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Ebenezer Manlove, on record in Delaware in the year 1764. The following century saw more Manlove surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Manlove who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included D. Manlove at the age of 32, settled in Philadelphia in the year 1822.

Manlove Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Manlove blazon are the anchor, chevron and flaming sword. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and ermine .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

A wide variety of inanimate objects 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281 appear in coats of arms, so of them still recognisable today, others now rather obscure. The images used are often simplified and stylised, the anchor is a typical case. For any meaning, we need look no further than a nautical or sea-faring heritage. Indeed, some arms go into great detail of the colours and arrangement of the stock, stem, cables and flutes of the anchor reflecting a detailed knowledge of the form and use of this device. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:anchor.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.13The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. Indeed, the sheer variety of different swords 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302 can be bewildering and expaining the difference between a scimitar and a falchion is perhaps best left to the expert! Sometimes the sword is described as flaming for added visual effect.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:anchor
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
13. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302