Manning Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Manning Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Manning Coat of Arms Meaning

Manning Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Manning. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

manning coat of arms

Manning Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Manning blazon are the cross patonce, lion, trefoil and rose. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and or.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross patonce is typical of these, whereby each arm of the cross expands and ends in a bud-like projection. These cross variations are probably largely for decorative effect, and to differentiate the arms from similar ones and hence their significance is that of the Christian cross itself.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 13A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The trefoil may originally been a representation of a specific plant (perhaps shamrock) but it has been used as a symbol almost since the beginning of heraldry and over time has adopted a stylised aspect. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil. Guillim believes that it signifies “perpetuity…the just man shall never wither”. 17A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109

Manning Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Manning Name

Manning Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Manning is an English surname but comes from the Pre 7th Century Norse Vikings. This surname is said to originate from “maningi” which can be translate to mean “valiant” or “strong.”

Variations:

More common variations are:

Manninga, Manniing, Manniong, Mainninig, Manninng, Mannuing, Hmanning, Manneing, Manningw, Mannin

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Manning can be found in the country of England, in the year of 1190. This person, who was said to have been named Ainulf Manning, was mentioned and recorded in the document known as the Pipe Rolls of Kent. This document, the Pipe Rolls of Kent, was ordered, decreed, and written under the rule of one King Richard I of England, who was known as, and commonly referred to throughout history as the “Lionheart.” King Richard I of England ruled from the year of 1189 to the year of 1199, with this document being one of the earlier ones of his reign. Other mentions of this surname include the christening of Johan Manning, who was the daughter of Launcelot Manning, at St. Mary Magdalene on January 14, 1564, while Katherine, daughter of William Mannings was christened in the year 1570, in the month of September, on the day of he 6th, at St. Mary Aldermary. One Thomas Manning was believed to be the first Chinese scholar in Europe, and was the first English man to ever enter Lhasa, which is the holy city in Tibet. Those who bore this surname of Manning can be found throughout history, all over the country of England. There are regions where this population of those who bear this surname is higher than others. These areas of the country of England where the population of people who bears the surname of Manning are Essex, Suffolk, Yorkshire, Cheshire, Lancashire, Northamptonshire, Somerset and Devon counties, as well as the city of London.

Scotland:

In the country of Scotland there are also many people who bear the surname of Manning. There are areas of this country where those who bear this surname are in higher populations than in other areas. The regions where those who bear the surname of Manning are in high concentrations include Lanarkshire, Angus, Perthshire, and Ayrshire counties.

United States of America:

The European Migration was a movement of people from the European countries who left their homeland in search of a better life. Many of these people went to the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as The New World or The Colonies, because this new land promised the freedoms that they were so hoping for. The first person to bear the surname of Manning and was recorded as arriving in the United States of America was one Edmund Manning, who was forty years of age when he arrived in New England in the year 1635. In the year of 1640, one William Manning landed in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, while one Thomas Manning Jr. and his wife Grace Manning arrived in the state of Maryland in the year of 1658. Those who carry the surname of Manning can be found in various concentrations all over the United States of America. The areas with higher concentrations of this surname include Massachusetts, New York Pennsylvania, Ohio, Tennessee, Georgia, Illinois, Texas and California.

Manning Today:

United States 84,345

England 16,498

Australia 7,721

Canada 5,491

South Africa 3,525

Ireland 2,015

New Zealand 1,744

Jamaica 1,606

Mexico 1,518

Scotland 893

Notable People:

Peyton Williams Manning (born in 1976) who is an American professional NFL quarterback, a two-time NFL Offensive Player of the Year, and a Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year in the year 2013

Elisha Nelson “Eli” Manning (born in 1981) who was an American NFL football quarterback for the New York Giants

Lynn Manning (1955-2015) who was a playwright, poet, and actor from America

J. Manning (died in 1979) who was a passenger from Los Angeles, California, USA, who flew aboard the American Airlines Flight 191 and died in the crash on May 25, 1979

Richard Francis Xavier “Brennan” Manning (1934-2013) who was an author from America, a friar, a priest, and a speaker

Raymond Brendan Manning (1934-200) who was a carcinologist in America

Brigadier-General Timothy J. Manning (born in 1905) who was a Commanding Officer in the 51st Troop Carrier Wing from 1944 to 1945 who was from America

Frankie Manning (1914-2009) who was a dancer, instructor, and choreographer from America

Manning Family Gift Ideas

Browse Manning family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More manning Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Cholmondley, co. Chester). Gu. a cross patonce betw. four trefoils slipped or.
2) (Stanbury in Shorwinstow, co. Cornwall). Per pale gu. (sometimes az.) and or, a lion ramp. counterchanged.
3) (Codham, co. Kent; granted 1577). Gu. a cross patonce betw. four cinquefoils or. Crest—Out of a ducal crown or, an eagle’s head sa. beaked gold, betw. two ostrich feathers ar.
4) (Eversfield, co. Devon). Motto—Esse quam videri. Same Arms. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a griffin’s head sa. betw. two feathers ppr.
5) (Downe, co. Kent; confirmed by Dethick, 20 April, 1577). Gu. a cross flory betw. four trefoils slipped or. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, an eagle'a head sa. beaked or, betw. two ostrich feathers ar.
6) (Diss, co. Norfolk). Quarterly, gu. and az. a cross flory betw. four cinquefoils pierced or. Creat—Out of a ducal coronet or, an eagle’s head sa. beaked gold, betw. two ostrich feathers ar.
7) (co. Sussex). Gu. a cross patonce betw. four trefoils or. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, an eagle’s head ar. betw. two wings sa.
8) Ar. a chev. betw. three quatrefoils gu.
9) (London; Isaac Manning, temp. James I.; his dau. and heir, Elizabeth, m. Humphrey Clerk, Esq., of Edmonton, co. Middlesex. Visit. Middlesex, 1663). Gu. three crosses botonnee or.
10) (Reg. Ulster’s Office). Gu. three crescents ar. a border erm. (another, the border of the second).
11) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1617, Grace Manning). Gu. three crescents or, a border ar.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
13. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil
17. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109