Manson Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Manson Family Coat of Arms

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Manson Coat of Arms Meaning

Manson Name Origin & History

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Manson Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Manson blazon are the crescent, cross calvary, mullet and lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and sable .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. 13Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67 The calvary cross is a special form that most closely represents the crucifixion, being mounted on a series of steps or grices. Wade suggests that three of these steps might represent “faith, hope and charity”. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 16A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Manson Name

Manson Origin:

Scotland

Origins of Manson:

The surname of Manson is said to be a Norse-Viking surname from the country of Scotland. The derivation of the surname of Manson comes from a Norse-Viking Pre 7th Century personal name of Magnusson, which means the son of Magnus. Magnus was a popular personal given name among the Norsemen. Magnus can be translated to mean “it is worth remembering.” Thus, the surname of Magnusson, from which Manson derives means “son of he who is worth remembering.” Another possible origin of the surname of Manson is that it stems from a nickname. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. In the case of the surname of Manson, this nickname was given to someone who was deemed as worthy.

Variations:

More common variations are: Manison, Mannison, Mainson, Mansson, Manuson, Mansoni, Mansone, Mainson, Mansioun, Monson

History:

Scotland:

The surname of Manson is popular within the country of Scotland, and began appearing within the 15th century. The first recorded spelling of the surname of Manson within the country of Scotland was said to be one Angus Monson, who was noted in the document known as the Court Registers of Kirkwall in the year of 1446. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King James I of Scotland, who ruled from the year of 1424 to the year of 1437. Other mentions of the surname of Manson within the country of Scotland include one Joseph Manson, who was recorded as being the official carpenter to Mary, Queen of Scots in the year of 1568, while one Neills Monson was named as a native of the Shetlands in the year of 1568 as well. Throughout the country of Scotland, those who are known to bear the surname of Manson, or Monson, are said to have hailed from a member of the Clan Gunn.

United States of America:

Within the 17th and 18th Centuries, it became common for European citizens to migrate to the United States of America to escape the often tyrannical governments of the countries of their birth. This large movement of people from Europe to the United States of America, which at that time was known as the New World or The Colonies was known as the European Migration. Among those who migrated to the United States was one Thomazin Manson, who was just 14 years of age when he arrived in New England in the year of 1635. Shortly after his arrival, in the year of 1654, one person by the name of Luke Manson landed in the state of Virginia. It is possible that more people who bore the name of Manson attempted to travel to the United States but perished on the transport ships from Europe to the United States of America.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Manson: United States 8,466; England 3,452; South Africa 2,356; Scotland 2,107; Canada 2,027; Australia 1,974; France 1,653, New Zealand 1,607; Brazil 970; Ghana 799

Notable People:

Marilyn Manson (born in 1969) who is a musician, actor, songwriter, multimedia artist, and painter from America, and who was born with the name of Brian Hugh Warner.

Mahlon Dickerson Manson (1820-1895) who was a politician and druggist from America, and who served as a Union General in the American Civil War.

David Manson (born in 1952) who is a film and television producer, director, and screenwriter from America who has been nominated for an Emmy Award, and is the recipient of a Peabody Award, and who is most notably recognized for his work on the popular series House of Cards (2013).

Hiram S. Manson, who served as the Postmaster at Allegan, Michigan in the year of 1871, and who was a Republican politician from America.

Herbert S. Manson, who served as the Candidate for the Wisconsin State Assembly from Marathon County in the 2nd District in the year of 1902, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Harry Manson, who served as a Member of the New Hampshire State Senate in the 5th District in the year of 1935, and who was a Republican politician from America.

Manson Family Gift Ideas

Browse Manson family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (England). Per chev. ar. and gu. in chief three crescents of the last. Crest—On a chapeau ppr. a garb or.
2) (Scotland, 16th century). Ar. a cross calvary betw. two mullets gu.
3) (Holland, from Scotland, 1672). Motto—Meae memor originia. Ar. a lion saliant ar. armed and langued vert, holding in his dexter paw a sword erected of the second within an orle of eight crescents or. Crest—A dexter hand holding a thistle ppr.
4) Sa. a chev. betw. three annulets ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
13. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
16. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105