Marden Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Marden Family Coat of Arms

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Marden Coat of Arms Meaning

Marden Name Origin & History

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Marden Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Marden blazon are the cornish choug, bend, talbot and unicorn. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and ermine .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. The Cornish Chough is a member of the crow family and is often depicted as black with red or orange beak and legs. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cornish chough Wade gives it the role of “king of crows” and believes that its use denotes a “man of stratagems”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P82

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

Many breeds of dog appear in coats of arms, reflecting their status as man’s closet companion. The talbot is a hunting dog akin to a terrier, and usually illustrated in a lifelike style and eager pose. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog In common with the other heraldic dogs, Wade suggests that their presence should suggest “courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68 Others might say we need look no further than a pleasure in the hunt and the affection for this sturdy breed.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Marden Name

Marden Origin:

England

Origins of Marden:

Listed as Marden, Mordan, Mordin, Mordon, Murden, and Morden, this is an English geographical surname. It derives from any of the places named as Marden, Morden, Moreden, and Mordon. For example, Marden in Herefordshire was listed as “Maurdine” in the Domesday Book of 1086. It acquires from the British “magno,” which means plain, and the Olde English pre 7th Century “worthign,” which means courtyard, while Morden in Cambridge means the slope with the moors and first noted as Mordun in the year 1015. The place in Kent was noted as Meredenna in the Pipe Rolls of 1166, and this is acquired from the Olde English “miere” which means a horse, and “denn,” which means a meadow. So, the grazing area for horses. “Boundary Hill” is the explanation of Marden in Sussex, listed as “Meredone” in the Domesday Book, a combination of the Olde English components “maere,” which means border, and “dun,” which means hill. Finally, Marden in Wiltshire noted as “Meresdene” in the Domesday Book, and acquires from the Olde English “mearc,” which means border and “denu,” which means Dale. So, the whole meanings of the name are “boundary valley.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Mareden, Mardeni, Mardene, Maraden, Mardien, Mardena, Mardden, Mardeen, Mardein, Mardeno.

England:

The origins of the surname Marden appeared in Cheshire where people held a family seat from early times. Someone say better before the success of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John de Mordon of Cambridge in the Hundred Rolls of Landowners of 1273, Robert de Murdone appears in Devonshire at the same time, while in the remaining early parish records of the city of London John Marden was a christening witness at the parish of Allhallows in 1588, It was during the time of Queen Elizabeth of England, who was known to be the “Good Queen Bess”, dated 1558-1603. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Marden had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Marden settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Marden who settled in the United States in the 18th century included William Marden, who arrived in Virginia in 1700. Samuel Marden and Samuel Marden, both landed in America in the same year 1782.

The following century saw more Marden surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Marden who settled in the United States in the 19th century included John Marden arrived in New York in 1812. Joaquin Marden landed in New Orleans, La in 1858. Clara Marden, Harriet Marden and Sarah Marden, all landed in New York in 1862.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Marden who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Mary Marden arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “City of London” in 1840. Hannah Marden, Margaret Marden, Edward Marden and Hannah Marden, all arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Sultana” in 1850.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Marden: United States 2,698; Brazil 1,415; England 834; Australia 279; Mauritius 146; Kazakhstan 105; New Zealand 78; Scotland 66; Indonesia 60; Canada 57.

Notable People:

Brice Marden was born in October 1938. He is an American artist, generally mentioned as a Minimalist, though his work may be hard to classify. He lives and works in New York City; Tivoli, New York; Hydra, Greece; and Eagles Mere, Pennsylvania.

Dr. John Marden (1855–1924), was an Australian headmaster, an administrator of women’s education, and Presbyterian elder.

Luis Marden (1913–2003), was an American photographer and adventurer for the National Geographic.

Marden Family Gift Ideas

Browse Marden family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Marden, co. Hereford, and London). Gu. a bend ar. in the dexter point a Cornish chough ppr. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a unicorn's head sa. armed and maned gold.
2) (London). Or, a bend gu. in the sinister chief point a Cornish chough ppr.
3) (co. Warwick). Erm. on a chief sa. a talbot pass. or, an annulet gu. for diff.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cornish chough
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P82
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68