Marland Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Marland Family Coat of Arms

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Marland Coat of Arms Meaning

Marland Name Origin & History

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Marland Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Marland blazon are the martlet, bars wavy and pellet. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, or and sable .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). It is also possible to place decorative edges along bars, typically these are smaller than those found on the major ordinaries like the fess and pale, but have the same design and share the same meanings. The decorative edge pattern Wavy, is a typical example of this. For obvious reasons it is associated with both water and the sea 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40. Indeed, a roundel with alternating bars of azure and argent (blue and white) is known by the shorthand term fountain, representing water at the bottom of a well 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water. Other colours have also been used and the result can be very pleasing to the eye.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and pellet is a roundle sable, or black. It is also known as an ogress or gunstone. Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Marland Name

Marland Origin:

England

Origins of Marland:

This most attractive surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a geographical name from Marland, a minor place in the church of Rochdale, in Lancashire. The place name itself is a combination of the Olde English components “mere,” which means a lake, pool, and “land,” land. So, “land by a lake.” There are also places called Peters Marland in Devon, noted as “Merland” in the Domesday Book of 1086 (the site of a parish committed to St. Peter), and Marlands in Somerset. The first noted named ancestor showed in the 13th Century, and a section of the family of Marland advanced to live and hold lands at Marland in Lancashire from the 13th Century until the second part of the 17th Century; the name is presently spread widely in the Parish Records of Lancashire and Devonshire. Ede Marland married Laurence Bonifeilde in July 1567, at St. Mary Major, Exeter, Devonshire and Ann, daughter of Jacob Marland, named in April 1583, at Rochdale, Lancashire.

Variations:

More common variations are: Mareland, Maryland,Mairland, Mariland, Marlando, Marlanda, Marlandi, Maurland, Maruland, Marlande.

England:

The surname Marland first appeared in Lancashire where they held a family seat as Kings of the Palace. The Saxon rule of English history declined after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries, and the Norman atmosphere prevailed. But Saxon surnames remained, and the family name first mentioned in the 13th century when Adam, Alan, and Andrew held lands in that shire in the township of Castleton. The various Martley demands their origin from Martley, a hamlet and local church in the Malvern Hills district of the of Worcestershire.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Alan de Merland, dated about 1250, in the “Chartulary of Ramsey Abbey,” Huntingdonshire. It was during the time of King Edward 1st, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Marland had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Marland landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Marland who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Thomas Marland, who arrived in New York, NY in 1825. Alfred Marland, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1869. Henry Marland, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1873. Carl Marland at the age of 20, who settled in America, in 1893.

The following century saw more Marland surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Marland who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Alice Marland at the age of 32, who landed in America from Stalybridge, England, in 1909. Annie A Marland aged 52, who emigrated to the United States from Manchester, England, in 1915. Betty Marland at the age of 23, who landed in America from Manchester, England, in 1915. Albert Marland at the age of 24, who moved to America from Kearsley, England, in 1921.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Marland who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Emma Marland, an English prisoner from Lancaster, who shifted aboard the “Arab” in December 1835, settling in Van Diemen ‘s Land, Australia.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Marland: England 1,328; United States 743; Australia 382; France 233; South Africa 219; Wales 113; Canada 99; Scotland 79; Brazil 64; Hong Kong 59.

Notable People:

Douglas Marland was a soap opera script author.

E. W. Marland was an Oklahoma director.

Jonathan Marland, Baron Marland was a British businessman and Conservative leader.

Lydie Marland was an American socialite.

Marland Family Gift Ideas

Browse Marland family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Kent). Gu. three bars wavy ar. (another, or), on each as many martlets sa.
2) Barry nebulée of six gu. and ar. seven martlets sa. three, three, and one, on a chief or, three pellets.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle