Marshall Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Marshall Family Coat of Arms

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Marshall Coat of Arms Meaning

Marshall Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Marshal.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Marshall. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Marshall Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Marshall blazon are the millrind, eagle’s head, crescent and horseshoe. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, gules and or .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The mill-rind, also known by a rather surprising number of names (fer-de-moline, inkmoline, mill-ink amongst others) is a distinctive symbol, but hard to place by modern viewers. It is a square or diamond shape with arms extending above and below and in fact represents the piece of iron that connects a circular timber axle to a mill-stone, used for grinding corn. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fer-de-moline These would obviously have been more familiar to those of the middle ages than they are today.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Marshall Name

Marshall Origin:

Germany, England, France

Origins of Name:

The surname of Marshall has origins in English, French, and Germanic origins. The first possible origin of the surname of Marshall comes from the Old French word of “mareschal” which can be translated to mean “horse.” Another possible origin of the surname of Marshall is that it comes from the Old Germanic, Pre 7th Century word of “marah,” which can be translated to mean “a horse” and the compound of “scalc” which can be translated to mean “a servant.” Thus, to the Germans, the surname of Marshall can be translated to mean “the servant of the horses.” In the Germanic culture, the surname of Marshall is referred to as an occupational surname. This means that the original bearer of the surname of Marshall most likely took care of the horses, meaning that he actually carried out this job. Occupational surnames were not originally hereditary surnames. They only became hereditary if the son followed in his father’s footsteps for a career; then the surname became hereditary and was used by the children and spouse of the son. Eventually, the surname of Marshall came to be an element of status within a household or an office of the state. The surname was regarded for nobility and high members of society.

Variations:

More common variations are: Marschall, Marshalla, Marashalli, Marshalli, Marashall, Marshaill, Marshalo, Maarshall, Maurshall, Marshally, Marshell, Marshal, Marskell, Mascall, Maskal, Marshalleck, Maskell, Matskill

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Marshall was found within the country of England. One person by the name of Godfridus Marescal was mentioned as being granted lands in the Doomsday Book of 1086. It is important to note that the Doomsday Book was created to encompass the “Great Survey” of England in that time period. Godfridus Marescal was said to have hailed from France, but was granted land by King William the 1st, shortly after the conquest of 1066. King William I of England, who was commonly referred to throughout history as one “William the Conqueror” ruled from the year 1066 to the year 1087. Other mentions of the surname of Marshall in the country of England include Rainald le Mareschall, who was mentioned in the “Documents Relating to the Danelaw” in the county of Lincolnshire in the year of 1140. Those who bear the surname of Marshall in the country of England can be found in the areas of Yorkshire, Durham, and the areas in and around the city of London. The county of Yorkshire boasts the highest amounts of people who bear the surname of Marshall.

Scotland:

Within the country of Scotland, there is a notable size of people who bear the surname of Marshall. The areas that have the largest concentration of people who are known by the surname of Marshall can be found within the counties of Midlothian, Ayrshire, and Lanarkshire counties.

United States of America:

Throughout the 1600’s, many European citizens began to migrate to the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as The New World. The first person to carry the surname of Marshall into the New World was someone by the name of Henry Marshall who was recorded as landing in the United States of America in the year o f 1620. The areas with the largest population of people who bear the surname of Marshall can be found in the states of New York, Ohio, Massachusetts, Virginia, Texas, Illinois, California, and Pennsylvania.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Marshall: United States 200,310; England 55,249; Australia 25,354; Canada 24,198; South Africa 14,885; Nigeria 11,004; Scotland 8,217; New Zealand 5,406; Liberia 3,672; Jamaica 3,427

Notable People:

John Marshall (1941-2016) who was an environmentalist from America, and who was the Founder of the Florida Environmental Research Institute

Lee Marshall (died in 2014) who was a professional wrestling announcer from America, who announced for the AWA (American Wrestling Association) and who also voiced Tony the Tiger

Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993) who was a jurist from America, was a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and was the first African American to serve on the Supreme Court of the Unite States

Samuel Scott Marshall (1821-1980) who was a Democratic politician from America, and who served as a Member of the Illinois State House of Representatives in 1847, served as a Circuit Judge in Illinois in the year 1851, and served as a U.S. Representative from Illinois in the year 1855 to the year 1859, and then again from the year 1865 to the year 1875

Schuyler L. Marshall, who was a Republican politician from America, and who served as a Member of the Michigan State Republican Central Committee in 1927, and who served as an Alternate Delegate to the Republican National Convention from Michigan in the year 1928

Marshall Family Gift Ideas

Browse Marshall family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Baron Marshal, barony passed to William, third Lord Morley, whose mother was Hawise, sister and heir of John, second Lord Marshal; William Marshal, descended from John Marshal, who sided with the Empress Maud against King Stephen, and was Marshal of the Realm 10 Henry II., was summoned to Parliament 1309). Gu. a bend fusilly or.
2) (Earl of Pembroke, extinct 1245; William Marshal, Marshal to Henry II., a member of the foregoing family, m. Isabel de Clare, only dau. and heir of Richard, Earl of Pembroke, the celebrated Strongbow, and acquired that earldom in her right, in which rank he carried the golden sceptre, surmounted by the cross, at the coronation of Richard I.). Same Arms, but after he became Marshal of the Realm he bore, Per pale or and vert a lion ramp. gu. armed and langued az.
3) (Blowbery and Windsor, co. Berks). (Burke's Supplement states The Arms, blazoned at p. 661, are said in Harl. MS. 1441, to have been granted by Bysshe, Garter, 14 Dec. 1647, to John Marshall, of London, Vintner.) Or, two bars gemelles sa. in chief a chesarook betw. two mullets of the last. Crest—A griffin’s head erased or, charged on the neck with a chessrook betw. two mullets sa.
4) (Fremington, co. Devon). Or, a millrind sa. on a chief gu. three antelopes’ heads erased or.
5) (Woodwalton, co. Huntingdon). Also of Finchingfield, co. Essex. Paly of six erm. and gu. on a chief az. three eagles' heads erased ar. Crest—An arrow ar. headed and feathered az. enfiled with a ducal coronet or.
6) (Abbotts Anne, co. Hants. Visit. 1575). Sa. three bars ar. a canton or. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet a stag’s head all or. Another Crest—Out of a ducal coronet a bull’s head all or.
7) (Much-Haddon. co. Herts). Gu. on a fesse ar. betw. three mascles or, as many lions’ heads erased az.
8) (granted to Col. Hubert Marshall). Motto—Ducit amor patriae. Barry of six ar. and sa. on a chev. engr. gu. three pheons or. Crest—A demi heraldic tiger sa. guttée d’or, armed, crined, tufted, and gorged with a collar gemel also or, resting the sinister paw upon an escocheon gu. charged with a pheon gold.
9) (Marston, co. Lincoln, and Fiskerton, Doncaster, &c.; granted, 1 June, 1562, to Henry Marshall, Esq., of Carleton). (Patterdale, co. Westmoreland). (Cookridge, co. York). (Mark Coniston, co. York). (Weetwood Hall, co. York). Motto—Nec cito nec tarde. (Burke's Supplement states "Instead of the localities there given, read, "Brandon, in the parish of Haugh, Marston, Doncaster," Whatton-in-the-Vale, &c." Sa. three bars ar. a canton erm. Crest—A man of arms from the waist upwards, armed in armour ppr. garnished or, beaver open, with a plume of feathers of divers colours on the helm, wearing a scarf gu. bawdric-wise, with a staff gold in his hand.
10) (Aislabie Grange, co. York, Theddlethorpe, co Lincoln, and London). Barry of six ar. and sa. a canton erm. Crest—A man in armour ppr. in his dexter hand a baton or, over his armour a sash gu.
11) (London). Ar. on a chev. engr. gu. betw. three spearheads sa. as many bezants, a chief paly of six gu. and az. thereon an antelope courant or.
12) (John Marshall, Alderman of London, 1548). Per pale or and sa. three greyhounds courant counterchanged, collared gold. Crest—A camel’s head or, gorged with a coronet.
13) Ar. a chev. embattled counter-embattled per fess gu. and sa. betw. three eagles' heads erased of the last. Crest—A beehive with bees volant about it ppr.
14) (Sellaby, co. Durham, and Chelsea, co. Middlesex). Ar. a chev. betw. three crescents gu.
15) (Pickering and Aislaby, co. York; descended from co. Notts). Same Arms. Crest—A man in armour ppr. holding in tbe dexter hand a truncheon or, over his armour a sash gu.
16) (Carleton, co. Notts; Humphrey Marshall, Visit. Notts, 1614, descended from John Marshall, of that place, temp. Edward I.; Harl. MSS., 1400; granted by Harvey, Norroy, 1562, to Henry Marshall, Esq., of Carleton). Sa. three bars ar. a canton erm. Crest—A demi man in armour ppr. holding in the dexter hand a baton, over the shoulder a sash az. tied at the shoulder with a ribbon gu.
17) (co. Northumberland). (Diceworth, co. Leicester). Ar. a chev. vert betw. three crescents gu.
18) (Southwark; granted, 1611, by Camden). (Ivythorne, co. Somerset; granted 1573). Ar. on a fesse betw. three chessrooks sa. as many mullets of the first. Crest—A dexter arm embowed in armour ppr. garnished or, a scarf of the last and az. holding in the hand ppr. a broken tilting-spear of the second.
19) Ar. a chev. cotised sa. betw. three bucks’ heads cabossed gu. Crest—A greyhound sejant ar. gorged with a collar gu. ringed or, resting the dexter foot on a buck’s head cabossed of the second.
20) (Broadwater, co. Surrey, formerly of co. Sussex; Thomas Marshall, son of Thomas Marshall. Esq., of Eastbourne, left the county, and m. in the year 1743, Mary, the only dau. of William Bryant, of Haslemere, co. Surrey). Motto—Spes mea in coelo. Az. on a pile betw. two anchors in base or, an anchor sa. Crest—A crested female figure vested ar. the right hand pointing to a rainbow above her head ppr. and with the left supporting an anchor in front sa.
21) (Milford, co. Wilts. Visit. Wilts, 1677). Gu. five swords in saltire, points upwards ar.
22) (Bescott and Walsall, co. Stafford, and Ward End, co. Warwick). Motto—Vi martiali Deo adjuvante. (Ward End House, co. Warwick; granted 1867). Motto—Vi martiali Deo adjuvante. Barry of six erm. and az. a horseshoe or, betw. three bezants. Crest—A bezant charged with a shoe az. betw. two wings barry of six erm. and az. (should be a horseshoe azure according to Burke's supplement).
23) (Alderman Sir Chapman Marshall, Knt., Lord Mayor of London in 1840). Paly of six erm. and gu. on a chief az. three griffins' heads erased or. Crest—An arrow erect or, flighted and barbed az. and enfiled in the centre with a ducal coronet or.
24) (Miclelham and Lewes, co. Sussex). Barry of six ar. and sa. on a canton erm. an escutcheon of the second. Crest—A demi man in armour ppr. in his dexter hand a baton or, tipped sa. a sash az.
25) (co. Wilts). Or, a fer-de-moline gu.
26) (co. York). Sa. on a fesse engr. or, betw. three garbs ar. a bird betw. two guttees gu.
27) Motto—Virtute tutus. Ar. a saltire az. betw. four laurel leaves vert, on a bordure gu. eight annulets or. Crest—A dove with an olive branch in the beak all ppr.
28) Ar. on a chev. engr. gu. betw. three lozenges sa. as many plates, a chief paly of four gu. and az. thereon an antelope courant or. Crest—A demi antelope with wings endorsed per pale.
29) Gu. two leopards pass. in pale or (another, ar.)
30) Paly of four ar. and vert (another, or and vert).
31) Ar. a fesse betw. six annulets sa. (another, the fess az. and three annulets).
32) Quarterly, sa. and ar. four mullets counterchanged.
33) Ar. a bend raguly vert betw. two crescents gu.
34) Or, an ink-moline sa. on a thief gu. three tigers' heads erased of the field.
35) Ar. on a chief az. three crosses formee fitchee of the first.
36) Ar on a fesse gu. three guttees erm.
37) Vert a fesse betw. three martlets ar.
38) (John William Phillips Marshall, Esq., of Rochester, co. Kent). Or, on a chev. az. betw. three lions ramp. gu. an anchor of the first surmounting a sword saltireways ppr. pommel and hilt gold, a chief wavy of the second, thereon a naval crown or, betw. a representation of the cross of the Imperial Russian Military Order of St. George on the dexter, and a like representation of the cross of the Royal Swedish Military Order of the Sword on the sinister, each pendent from the respective ribbons of the said orders all ppr. Crest—Upon a mount vert, in front of a Newfoundland dog sejant reguard. ppr. an escutcheon ar. thereon in base waves of the sea, and floating therein a naked man, the sinister arm elevated also ppr.
39) (Treworgy House, co. Cornwall; William Marshall, Esq., of that place, inherited tee seat and estate from the family of Connock, whose residence it was in the reign of Henry III.; he descended paternally from the co. Devon). (The Priory, Totnes, co. Devon). Motto—Ordine Colloco. Motto—Utilem pete finem. Or, a millrind sa. on a chief gu. three antelopes’ heads of the field. Crest—An antelope’s head erased or.
40) (Ardwick and Penwortham Lodge, co. Lancaster, and Taunton, co. Somerset). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. two bars ar. betw. as many flanches erm. on each a cross crosslet of the field, for Marshall; 2nd and 3rd, or, a heron sa. a chief of the last, thereon three annulets gold, for Earnshaw. Crest—A man habited as a pikeman of the seventeenth century, and in a corslet, holding in the dexter hand across crosslet fitchée or, on the head in profile a morion ppr. plumed gu.
41) (alias Bury). (Visit. Warwick, 1619). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three squirrels ppr.
42) (alias Lokesmyth) Ar. a cher. betw. three horseshoes sa. a chief gu. Crest—Out of a mural crown ar. an eagle’s head ppr.
43) (Church Aston, co. Salop, 1769). Motto—Virtus semper virescit. Az. a saltire ar. on a chief of the second three edock leaves slipped vert. Crest—A buck couchant ppr
44) (Queensborough). Motto—Semper virescit virtus. Ar. a saltire couped az. betw. three edock leaves slipped vert. Crest—A trefoil slipped ppr.
45) (Hillcairney, co. Fife, 1792). Ar. a saltire az. betw. three edock leaves slipped in chief and flanks ppr. and a heart in base sa. all within a bordure of the last. Crest—A dove with an olive branch in its beak ppr. Motto—Virtute tutus.
46) (Luncarty, co. Perth, 1872). Ar. on a saltire az. betw. three cdock leaves slipped ppr, in chief and flank, and a hunting horn sa. stringed gu. in base, a cross crosslet fitchée of the field. Crest and Motto as the last.
47) (Hunter-Marshall, of Callendar, co. Perth, 1872). Motto—Decerpta dahunt odores. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a saltire az. betw. four laurel leaves slipped vert, a bordure sa., for Marshall; 2nd and 3rd, gu. a hunting horn stringed or, on a chief engr. of the second three mullets of the first. Crest—A dove with an olive branch In its beak ppr.
48) (Curriehill, co. Edinburgh, 1873). Motto—Alta petit. Ar. a saltire sa. betw. three edock leaves slipped vert in chief, and a bell of fhe second in base, a bordure gu. Crest—A dove ppr.
49) (Dublin; Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1597, John Marshall, formerly Sheriff of the city). Gu. a bend lozengy ar. a crescent for diff.
50) (Reg. Ulster’s Office). Gu. a cross betw. four crescents ar.
51) (Carrigonnon, co. Cork; Crest granted 16 May, 1608, to Robert Marshall, of the Castle of Carrigonnon, co. Cork, and to his brother, Sir George Marshall, Equerry to James I.). Barry of six ar. and sa. a canton erm. Crest—A lion ramp. holding a cross pattée fitchée.
52) (granted by Betham, Ulster, to John Markham Marshall, Esq., of Ballymacanam, co. Kerry, son of Ralph Marshall, Esq., by Jane, his wife, dau. and heir of John Markham, Esq., of Brewsterfield, same co.). Barry of six ar. and sa. on a canton erm. an inescutehcon of the second, charged with a trefoil slipped or. Crest—A demi man in nrmour affrontée ppr. girded round the lions with a sash gu. holding a baton sa. tipped or, and charged on the breast with a red rose ppr.
53) (exemplified to Richard John Leeson, Esq., on his assuming, by royal licence, 1852, the surname of Marshall, instead of that of Leeson, in compliance with the testamentary injunction of his maternal uncle, John Markham Marshall, Esq., of Callinferry, co. Kerry). Motto—Sapere aude. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, barry of six ar. and sa. on a canton erm. an escutcheon of the second, charged with a trefoil slipped or, a crescent gu. for diff., for Marshall; 2nd, gu. a chief nebuly ar. the rays of the sun issuing therefrom or, for Leeson; 3rd, or, on a chief az. a demi lion ar. holding betw. the paws a harp of the first, for Markham. Crests—1st: A demi man in armour affrontée ppr. holding in the dexter hand a baton sa. tipped or, charged on the breast with a rose gu. girded with a sash also gu. a crescent as in the arms for diff., for Marshall; 2nd: A demi lion ramp. gu. holding in the paws a sun or, partially eclipsed by clouds ppr. for Leeson; 3rd: A winged lion sejant guard, ar. wings addorsed holding betw. the forepaws a harp or, the head encircled with a plain glory of the last, for Markham.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fer-de-moline
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106