McConnell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Mcconnell Family Coat of Arms

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Mcconnell Coat of Arms Meaning

Mcconnell Name Origin & History

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Mcconnell Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the McConnell blazon are the ship, trefoil, lion rampant and stag. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, gules and sable .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

We do not need to look far to find the symbolism in the presence of a ship in a coat of arms, they appear regularly in the arms of port towns and merchant companies and families. They usually appear as a three masted wooden vessel known as a lymphad 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Shiop but are often described in some detail as to the disposition of their sails, presence and colours of flags and standards and so on. 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P294

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The trefoil may originally been a representation of a specific plant (perhaps shamrock) but it has been used as a symbol almost since the beginning of heraldry and over time has adopted a stylised aspect. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil. Guillim believes that it signifies “perpetuity…the just man shall never wither”. 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 16Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Mcconnell Name

May Origin:

England, France, Germany, Netherlands

Origins of Name:

The surname May is an ancient surname that most likely originates from a Norman French Introduction then to medieval England. The original word it derives from is “mai”. Mai was used as a word as a term of endearment or greeting given to a young person. It was also used as a term of endearment for someone who was a close friend of kin. This trend extends all the way to the 21st century where we see nicknames used for terms of endearment such as “lad” or “dude”, the former which can be used interchangeably between males or females.

The surname could also be used as a pet name or shortened version of the name “Matthew”. Matthew itself with some plural endings could possibly mean “Son of May”. The name Matthew is biblical in origin. It comes from the Hebrew male name “Matityahu” meaning gift of God. The name is recorded in the Greek version of the New Testament in the form of “Matthaias”. It is often seen as a Middle English given name and the modern version “Matthew”.

Finally, many children were often christened with the name “May”. A surname will evolve often times when a baby is christened with a given baptismal name. In this case the May baptismal surname is thought to only have been given to female babies. This is rare as normally there is no gender bias with given names that then eventually evolve into surnames.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Mayo, Mayy, Maey, Mawy, Mayh, Maoy, Maya, Moay, Mauy, Mayi, Mayu, Maay, Muay, Maye, Meay, Miay, Mhay, Maiy, Mway, Hmay,

History:

England:

The first known recorded spelling of the May surname is known as William Mai in 1167 who was recorded in the Pipe Rolls of Norfolk.

In 1177, William le Mai was also recorded in the Pipe Rolls of Norfolk, and it is unknown if there is any relation to the prior William Mai.

In 1221, Thomas le Mey and Goscelin Mey were recorded in the Book of Ely in Abbey Sufolk.

In 1275, John Meys was recorded in Gloucestershire in the Hundred Rolls of Gloucestershire.

Later recordings of the May surname include Stephen Mays in 1332 recorded in the Warsickshire Subsidy Rolls. Ann Mays was christened in the church of St. Mary the Virgain, Aldermanbury in London in 1596.

Scotland:

It is believed the surname is from the Old English word “maeg” meaning male kinsman, and warrior. William May built and settled his line in Berwick in 1291. David May was feudal lord of lands of Chapeltoun of Both in 1587. In 1597, Alexander May appears in Bourhilis, Aberdeenshire records. John Maii was recorded in 1638 in Harvestoun in Tillycultrie and in 1640, Robert Maii was recorded in Dunglas.

The MacDonald clan is notably a form of the name Omay.

Ireland

The surname May in Ireland was written and pronounced differently as it derives from the Gaelic surname O Miadhaigh. May is an Anglicized version of the surname O Miadhaigh, which means “descendant of Miadhach”. The name is also a nickname given to a person that would mean “honorable” or “proud”.

The surname O Miadhaigh is an old Westmeath surname, which can still be found today in the midlands. However, it is more frequently found today in Roscommon and the southern parts of Mayo. Sir Hugh de Lacy was famously killed by a O Miadhaigh, who cut off his head with an axe at the castle of Durrow in 1186. Sir Hugh de Lacy was nicknamed “the profaner and destroyer of many churches”.

The family O Miadhaigh itself was originally located in Teffia. Teffia was a County Westmeat. The family had given their name to the lands and forests known as Clonyveey or Cluain Ui Mhiadhaigh. The Anglecized version of this is O’Mey’s meadow.

As happened to many Irish families of that time they were forced to move off of their homeland by Norman families. During the Norman conquest of England many Norman families were given land, which further spread to Ireland when they would reach its shores too.

May Today:

United States 119,775

Mexico 31,591

England 29,361

South Africa 18,593

Malaysia 14,266

Australia 12,641

Cambodia 9,771

Canada 9,088

Brazil 9,031

Nigeria 6,725

Russia 6,087

Sudan 4,639

France 4,200

Notable People:

Thomas Erskine May (1815-1886), English constitutional expert

Philip William May (1864-1903), English caricaturist

Peter May (b. 1929), English cricket player

Harold May (b. 1947), English guitarist

David LaFrance May (1943-2012), American Baseball outfielder

Bert Deems May (b. 1969), NFL player in the US

Mcconnell Family Gift Ideas

Browse Mcconnell family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Kintyre, co. Argyll). Quarterly, 1st, az. a lion ramp. ar.; 2nd, or, a dexter hand gu. grasping a cross crosslet fitchée az.; 3rd, or, a lymphad sa.; 4th, per pale ar. and az. a rock gu.
2) (Carsriggan, co. Wigtown, and Cressbrook, co. Derby, 1860). Or, in dexter chief a dexter arm couped in fess gu. the hand holding a cross crosslet fitchee erect sa. in sinister chief a galley, her sails furled and oars in action of the third, flagged of the second, and in base a lion ramp, also of the second, on a chief of the second three trefoils slipped of the first. Crest—A stag's head erased gu. charged in the neck with a trefoil slipped or. Motto—Victor in arduis.
3) (Manchester, 1860). As the last, with the chief engr. Same Crest and Motto.
4) (Queensland, 1860). As the last, with the chief invected. Same Crest and Motto.
5) (co. Dublin). Per fess ar. and vert a stag trippant ppr. betw. three trefoils slipped counterchanged. Crest—A stag's head erased ar. charged on the neck with a trefoil slipped vert.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Shiop
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P294
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141