Miller Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Miller Family Coat of Arms

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Miller Coat of Arms Meaning

Miller Name Origin & History

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Miller Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Miller blazon are the wolf, cross moline, mascle and mullet. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and gules .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The wolf was the symbol of Rome long before the advent of heraldry, and before that was sacred to the ancient Egyptians. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P31 In heraldry it is probably more often just as head than the whole animal, but when whole it can be in many different poses. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wolf It is found from the earliest instances of arms, but quite often due to a derivative of its French name, loup sharing the initial sound of many family names like LOWE and LOVATT.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross moline is typical of these whereby each arm of the cross expands and curves outwards, reminscent of the fer-de-moline from which it gets its name. These cross variations are probably largely for decorative effect, and to differentiate the arms from similar ones and hence their significance is that of the Christian cross itself.

The mascle is a close relative of the lozenge or diamond shape, but with the centre cut away revealing the background underneath. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle. Guillim, writing in the 17th century reckoned the mascle to represent the mesh of a net, being the biblical symbol for “persuasion, whereby men are induced to virtue and verity”. 15A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Miller Name

Miller Origin: England, Scotland

Origins of Name:

The surname of Miller is an occupational surname that was used to describe either a miller of corn, or someone who was in charge of a mill. This surname of Miller can be derived from the pre 7th Century Old English word “mylene” which later evolved into “milne” and derived itself from the Latin “molere,” all of which can be translated to mean “to grind.” As with all occupational surnames, Miller was only originally given to the person who actually held the occupation of miller, and was then given to his son if he followed his father’s career path. After the second generation, the surname became hereditary rather than occupational. Those who carried this surname of Miller were in a privileged seat in society due to the notoriety of a mill. Millers were often paid in ground corn by the farmers who used the mill. Another derivative for this surname comes from the Old Gaelic “meillear” which was a nickname given to someone who had large lips. Another possible origin for the surname of Miller was one “malair” which in Old Gaelic can be translated to mean “merchant” or “maillor” which in Old Gaelic can be translated to mean a “soldier” or an “armed man.” Both of these possible origins are also occupational names, which when adapted into a surname were not hereditary until the son followed the father into the same line of work.

Variations:

More common variations are: Meiller, Millear, Millere, Millery, Millera, Milleri, Muiller, Misler, Mailer, Millar, Miiller

History:

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Miller in the country of Scotland was one James Miller, who lived from the year 1812 to the year 1864, and was the surgeon to Queen Victoria. James Miller was a notable and noble person who bore this surname in the country of Scotland, and one of the coats of arms for this surname is based off of his service to the Queen.

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Miller was found in the country of England. One person by the name of Ralph Muller was named in the Subsidy Tax Rolls of Sussex in the year of 1296. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward 1 of England who was known as, and comonly referred to throughout history as “The Hammer of the Scots” and ruled from the year 1272 to the year 1307. Other mentions of this surname of Miller were one Reginald Miller, who was named in the Subsidy Tax Rolls of Sussex in the year of 1327.

United States of America:

During the 17th Century, it was common for European settlers to relocate to the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as “The New World” or “The Colonies.” This migration, referred to as The Great Migration by some, and also known as The European Migration, stemmed from the dissatisfaction that European settlers had with their home country. The living conditions, job availability, and the promise of land availability were reasons that these settlers wanted to come to a new land. The first person to migrate to America who was recorded to bear the surname of Miller was one Sander Miller, who arrived in New England in the year 1652. It is possible that someone who bore this surname of Miller attempted to travel to America earlier in the European Migration, but could not survive the harsh conditions of the transport vessels, and passed away en route.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Miller: United States 1,203,150; England 63,213; Canada 57,656; Russia 47,828; Australia 37,407; South Africa 30,848; Brazil 29,939; Switzerland 21,157; Nigeria 18,187; Jamaica 13,778

Notable People:

John C. Miller (1947-2016) who was a Member of the Virginia State Senate from the year 2008 to the year 2016, and who was a politician from America

Hubert Maikhail Miller II (1992-2016) who was a football quarterback from America

Walter Dale “Walt” Miller (1925-2015) who was the 29th Governor of the state of South Dakota from the year 1993 to the year 1995, and was the 34th Lieutenant Governor of South Dakota from 1987 to the year 1993

Kristine Miller (1925-2015) who was born with the name Jacqueline Olivia Eskesen, and was a film actress from America, who was most notably recognized for her appearances in film noir and American Western pictures

Van Miller (1927-2015) who was a radio and television sportscaster from America, and who was inducted into the Buffalo Broadcasting Hall of Fame in the year 1998

Dane A. Miller (1946-2015) who was a business executive from America, and was the co-founder of Biomet (which was an orthopedic company) and served as the president of the company, and the chief executive from 1978 to the year 2006

Miller Family Gift Ideas

Browse Miller family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Chichester, co. Sussex, bart.; granted by Dugdale, Garter, 1684). Ar. a fesse wavy az. betw. three wolves' heads erased gu. Crest—A wolf's head erased ar. gorged with a collar wavy az.
2) (Plumpton, co. Cumberland). Erm. three wolves' heads erased az. vulned gu. Crest—A caltrap or, the upper point ermbrued ppr.
3) (Dunstable, co. Bedford; granted 1765). (Collier's Wood, co. Surrey; Boyd Darby, Esq., assumed the surname of Miller by royal licence, 1800). Per fesse ar. and az. in chief two wolves' heads erased purp. collared or, in base a lion pass, of the last. Crest—A wolf's head erased per pale erm. and purp. collared or.
4) (co. Surrey; allowed at the Visit, of that co., 1662, and borne by John Francis Miller, Esq., of Timberham, in the parish of Charlwood, and afterwards of Werndean Hall, Norwood). Motto-Mea spes est in Deo. Erm. a fess gu. betw. three wolves' heads erased az. Crest—A wolf's head erased az. collared erm.
5) (co. Devon, and Islington, co. Middlesex). Az. an escutcheon betw. four mascles or. Crest—A demi lion ramp. guard. az. holding a mascle or.
6) (Preston, co. Lancaster; granted to Thomas Miller, Esq., of Winckley Square, in that town). Per pale or and gu. a fess dancettee betw. three wolves' heads erased counterchanged. Crest—A wolf's head erased bendy or and gu. in the mouth a ragged staff sa. Motto—Sibimet merces industria.
7) (Cawne, Frome, Kingston, and Leigh, co. Dorset, and co. Hants). (Radway, co. Warwick). Az. four mascles in cross or. Crest—A demi lion az. holding betw. the paws a mascle or.
8) (co. Dorset). Vert a chev. betw. three rams ar.
9) (Oxenhoath, co. Kent, bart., extinct 1714; descended from Nicholas Miller, Esq., of Horsnells Crouch in Wrotham, Sheriff of Kent, 3 Charles I.). Erm. a fesse gu. betw. three wolves' heads erased az. Crest—A wolf's head erased az. collared erm.
10) (London). Az. a cross ar. betw. four mascles or.
11) (granted 16 May, 1672). Ar. a double tressure flory counterflory, over all a fesse embattled counter-embattled gu.
12) (granted by Camden). Erm. three wolves' heads erased az.
13) Per fesse ar. and az. in chief two wolves' heads erased purp. collared or, and in base a lion pass. of the last. Crest—A wolf's head erased per pale or and purp. collared gold.
14) Erm. three wolves' heads erased gu. Crest—cheval-trap or, the uppermost point embrued gu.
15) (granted in 1821 to Thomas Miller, Esq., of Preston, co. Lancaster, Mayor of that borough in 1827). Az. on a fesse ar. betw. two bees volant in chief ppr. and in base a wolf's head couped or, a wheelshuttle in fesse also ppr. Crest—A demi wolf erm. gorged with a collar gobony ar. and az. supporting with the paw a spindle erect ppr.
16) (Ballycasey, co. Clare). Ar. a fesse wavy az. betw. three griffins' heads erased gu. Crest—A griffin's head erased ar. ducally gorged and chained az.
17) (DownPatrick, co. Down; confirmed to Alexander Miller, Esq., grandson of Robert Miller, Esq., of Coleraine, by Mary Anne, his wife, dau. and co-heiress of William Gamble, Esq., of Derry, and their descendants). Motto—Nil conscire sibi. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, erm. a tower ppr. betw. three wolves' heads erased az., for Miller; 2nd and 3rd, gu. a fleur-de-lis or, on a chief ar. three roses of the field stalked and leaved vert, for Gamble. Crest—A wolf's head erased az. charged with a rose or.
18) (Scotland). Ar. a cross moline az.
19) (Gourlebank, Scotland). Motto—Unione augetur. Ar. a cross moline az. placed in a loch ppr. and in chief two mullets of the second. Crest—Two arms, their hands joined ppr.
20) (Glenlee, co. Kirkcudbright, bart., 1788). Motto—Manent optima coelo. Ar. a cross moline az. the base wavy vert, in chief a lozenge betw. two mullets of the second. Crest—A dexter hand with the first and second fingers pointing upwards ppr. Supporters—Two roebucks ppr.
21) (Manchester, from Scotland, 1784). Motto—Manent optima coelo. Ar. a cross moline betw. three stars az. a bordure gu. Crest—A dexter hand with the forefinger pointing upwards ppr.
22) (Minister of Cumnock, 1814). Motto—Spei bonae atque animae. Sa. a cross moline ar. a chief of the last. Crest—A dexter hand with the first and second fingers pointing upwards ppr.
23) (Manderston, co. Berwick, hart., 1854). Motto—Omne bonum superne. Ar. a cross moline az. square pieced of the field, on a chief gu. a garb betw. two mullets or. Crest—A dexter hand erect with the first and second fingers pointing upwards issuing out of a cloud ppr.
24) (St. Petersburgh, 1853). Or, a cross moline az. square pierced of the field, a bordure gu. on a chief of the last a garb betw. two mullets or. Crest and Motto, as the last.
25) (Leith, 1853). Or, a cross moline az. square pierced of the field, a bordure engr. erm. on a chief gu. a garb betw. two mullets or. Same Crest and Motto.
26) (Craigentinny, co. Edinburgh, 1859). Motto—Manent optima coelo. Ar. a cross moline az. charged with five lozenges or. Crest—A dexter hand erect holding an open book ppr.
27) (Chrystie-Miller, of Cragentinny, 1868). Motto—Sic viresco. Quarterly, 1st and 4th grand quarters counter-quartered, 1st and 4th, ar. a cross moline az., for Miller, 2nd, ar. a mullet pierced az. betw. three cross crosslets fitchee gu., for Adam, 3rd, per fess az. and sa. a castle with four towers ar. porch open and windows of the second, for Rawson; 2nd and 3rd grand quarters, or, a saltire engr. betw. two mullets in chief and base and two roses in flank sa., for Chrystie. Crest and Motto, for Miller, as the last; for Chrystie: A holly stump withered sprouting out leaves ppr.
28) (Leithen, co. Peebles, 1864). Ar. a cross moline az. square pierced of the field betw. four hearts gu. Crest—dexter hand with one finger pointing upwards ppr. Motto—In coelo spero.
29) (Pittendreich, co. Forfar, 1864). Motto—Manent optima coelo. Ar. a cross moline square pierced of the field betw. two helmets ppr. in chief and as many cross crosslets of the second in base. Crest—A dexter hand with one finger pointing upwards ppr.
30) (Rathcormuck, co. Cork; descended from Rev. John Millerd, who removed into that kingdom from co. Hereford in 1654, at the special invitation of Cromwell's Commissioners, and became Rector of Passage, co. Waterford; confirmed to Charles Hugh Millerd, Esq., of Rathcormuck, co. Cork, and the descendants of his grandfather. Rev. Thomas Millerd, of Glintown, co. Cork). Motto—Per mille ardua. Erm. a fess az. betw. three wolfs' heads erased sa. Crest—Out of a baron's coronet ppr. a griffin's head couped gu. holding in the mouth a rose branch ppr.
31) (Glintown, co. Cork, and Monard, same co.; allowed and Ped. Reg. by Betham, Ulster, 1815). Motto—Per mille ardua. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, same Arms; 2nd and 3rd, sa. a cinquefoil ar. betw. three leopards' heads erased and affrontee or. Crest—Out of a baron's coronet ppr. a griffin's head gu. holding in the beak a rose branch all ppr.
32) (Baron Sondes). Motto—Esto quod esse videris. Erm. a fer-de-moline betw. two martlets in pale sa. on a chief engr. az. two marlions' wings conjoined or. Crest—A hon ramp, erminois, holding betw. the paws a fer-de-moline, as in the arms. Supporters—Dexter, a griffin ar. ducally gorged or; sinister, a bear ppr. collared with a belt, buckled, the strap pendent ar. charged with two crescents or, the buckle and edges of the last.
33) (Scotland). Ar. a cross moline betw. four hearts gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P31
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wolf
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle
15. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234