Mould Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Mould Family Coat of Arms

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Mould Coat of Arms Meaning

Mould Name Origin & History

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Mould Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Mould blazon are the bar, torteaux and lio. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). Bars can be a distinctive and easily recognised device, early examples include those awarded by Henry III of England to the family MAUDYT Argent, two bars gules.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and torteau is a roundle gules, or red. (We must be careful however not to confuse this with the word in French heraldry, in which torteau means roundle and must have the colour specified.) Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 15A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Mould Name

Mould Origin:

England

Origins of Mould:

This interesting and uncommon name has two possible origins, the first and most similar being the old English female specific name ‘Mahalt, Malt, Mauld,’ or ‘Maud,’ alternatives to the Normans who gave the name ‘Mathilde’ and was brought into England after the invasion of 1066. The name is a combination of the Germanic components ‘maht’, which means might, power, and ‘wild,’ which means battle. William, the Champion’s wife, was named ‘Matilda,’ and was called ‘Mold’ by Robert of Gloucester. William’s grand-daughter also carried the name ‘Matilda,’ and it was she who contradicted the authority of England with her cousin Stephen during the mid-12th Century. A second possible origin is from a pet name for a bald man, from the Middle English ‘mould’, which means the top of the head. The ‘new’ spellings contain Moult, Mold, Mould, Maude, etc. while early documentation contains Mary, the daughter of John Mold, named at the parish of St Michael Bassishaw, London in July 1586, and the wedding of John Mould and Averell Ruddocke noted at St. Nicholas, Cole Abbey, London, in January 1637.

Variations:

More common variations are: Mouldy, Moulde, Mouldi, Moulod, Moulid, Mould, Moulad, came to Virginia in, Mouled, Mouldh.

England:

The surname Mould first appeared in Cheshire where the family of Maude, originally the Kings of Monte Alto, in Italy, settled in the Championship and lands of Montalt and Hawarden in the district of Flint.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Gilbert Mald, dated about 1190, in the “Essex Pipe Rolls.” It was during the time of King Richard 1st, who was known to be the “The Lionheart,” dated 1189-1199. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varietions of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Mould had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Mould landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Mould who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Mould settled in Virginia in 1651. Martin Mould, who landed in Maryland in 1657.

People with the surname Mould who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Martin Mould settled in Maryland in 1754.

The following century saw more Mould surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Mould who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included James Mould, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1844.

Canada:

People with the surname Mould settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in the 18th and 20th Some of the people with the surname Mould who came to Canada in the 18th century included Stephen Mould, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749.

The following century saw much more Mould surnames arrive. People with the surname Mould who settled in Canada in the 20th century included Sylvia Mould and Arthur Mould, both arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in the same year 1907.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Mould who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Margaret Mould arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “Eliza.” R.G. Mould arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Caspar” in 1849. Margaret Mould arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Eliza” in 1849.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Mould who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included John Mould arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Bombay” in 1865.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Mould: England 3,243; Ghana 2,636; United States 1,075; South Africa 968; Australia 709; Canada 489; Scotland 282; Wales 248; New Zealand 135; France 110.

Notable People:

Philip Jonathan Clifford Mould OBE was born in 1960. He is an English art dealer and art Professor.

Mould Family Gift Ideas

Browse Mould family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Appleby, co. Liecester; represented by the Rev. John Mould, M.A., of Appleby). Ar. two bars sa. in chief three torteaux. Crest—A dexter arm erect ppr.
2) (co. York, 1665). Sa. two bars wavy ar. in chief a lion pass. guard. of the last. Crest—A demi lion ramp. guard. or.

1 Comment

  • Mrs Bee says:

    England: Many of the Mould family [crest contains the raised fist & motto Tendimus Ad Terram] were clergy at the church of St Michael & All Angels, Appleby Magna , Leicestershire from 1610 (or in villages in nearby Staffordshire, Derbyshire & Warwickshire) and wall monuments remain. Appleby Magna/Parva parish baptism/marriage/burial register details from 1572 to 1800s can be viewed via the village portal “applebymagna.proboards.com”

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
15. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60