Mucklow Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Mucklow Family Coat of Arms

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Mucklow Coat of Arms Meaning

Mucklow Name Origin & History

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Mucklow Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Mucklow blazon are the lion, escallop and fleur-de-lis. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, azure and ermine .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 17Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 19A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Mucklow Name

Mucklow Origin:

England

Origins of Mucklow:

According to the early recordings of the spelling of the name, this interesting and unique name is listed with many spelling forms such as Mucklo, Muckloe, Mucklow, Micklowe, Muckelo, and very few as Muchslows, this is an English geographical surname. It acquires from a place in Worcestershire named as Mucklow, which is perhaps of Olde English pre 7th-century sources. The meaning of the name is almost surely “large hill” from the components “mucha – hlaw,” but this is not proven. Geographical surnames were frequently given to people after they departed from their original homes and moved to any other place, although “elsewhere” could be the next hamlet. It was in centuries past, and to some measure, it survived so at the end of the 20th century, that the easiest way to recognize a “stranger” is to call him or her, by the name of the place from whence they arrived. In this situation, the surname in all its different forms were well noted in the division of Worcestershire, so it would seem that the actual named ancestors moved by natural choice, rather than being driven off of their estates, as was often the case. When that happened they usually traveled for the then “big cities” of London, Bristol and Norwich.

Variations:

More common variations are: Muckalow, Mcklow, Muklow, Muclow, Muckellow, Muchlow, Micklow, Mocklow, McLow.

England:

The surname Mucklow first appeared in Worcestershire where they held a family seat as Kings of the Castle. The Saxon command of English history declined after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries, and the Norman atmosphere overcame. But Saxon surnames remained, and the family name first mentioned in the 13th century when they held lands in that division.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Anne Muckloe, who married Richard Haull, at St Helens Church, Worcester, on November 2nd, 1562, and Alice Mucklow, who married Gilbert Southall, at Halesowen, Worcestershire, on October 8th, 1575. It was during the time of Queen Elizabeth I, who was known to be the “Good Queen Bess,” dated 1558-1603. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Mucklow had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Mucklow landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Mucklow who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Mrs. Street Mucklow at the age of 31, who settled in America, in 1897. William A. Mucklow at the age of 25, who landed in America, in 1897.

The following century saw more Mucklow surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Mucklow who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Mrs. Mucklow, who emigrated to the United States, in 1905. Walter Mucklow at the age of 40, who emigrated to the United States, in 1905. John Davies Mucklow at the age of 73, who settled in America from London, in 1907. Edward Mucklow at the age of 64, who landed in America from Bury, England, in 1910. Gordon Mucklow at the age of 17, who landed in America from Bury, England, in 1910.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Mucklow: United States 347; England 231; Canada 41; Australia 11; France 3; Czech Republic 2; Switzerland 2; The Bahamas 2; Scotland 2; Netherlands 2.

Notable People:

Ernest Mucklow passed away in April 1953. He was an Australian rules football player. He played for Port Adelaide Football Club in the 1920s and 1930s. He also played for the Victorian countryside, Dimboola, during the 1920s.

Billi Mucklow is an English television star who is famous for the reality television show The Only Way Is Essex.

Mucklow Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Broughton Sulney, co. Nottingham). Gyronny of six or and az. a lion ramp. erm. on a chief of the first an escallop betw. two fleurs-de-lis sa. a canton gu. Crest—A griffin's head couped per pale indented ar. guttée de larmes and gu. holding in the beak an eagle’s leg erased a la cuisse or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
19. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489